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How to service your car

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  • Thats good to hear Nissan Doctor, I am a little unsure about the spark plugs, is it just a screw out screw in job?




  • Thats good to hear Nissan Doctor, I am a little unsure about the spark plugs, is it just a screw out screw in job?


    4 x 10mm bolts, 1 for each coil pack. 16mm plugs socket remove old plugs, refit new plugs.:)




  • So I attempted my first service yesterday and it didn't exactly go according to plan.

    Done the spark plugs first which was easy and also the air filter, then I jacked up the car and tried to turn the oil filter which did not budge as hard as I tried it wouldn't turn so thats that I may get an adjustable wrench to take it off. Bit disappointed with it tbh.




  • Done the spark plugs first which was easy and also the air filter, then I jacked up the car and tried to turn the oil filter which did not budge as hard as I tried it wouldn't turn so thats that I may get an adjustable wrench to take it off. Bit disappointed with it tbh.

    I'd recommend getting a different tool for removing the filter, there's various types on the market and some will be suited more to your car. In the past I used the chain wrench but find the band one best for my car.

    http://www.halfords.ie/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_11101_catalogId_15551_productId_209641_langId_-1_categoryId_212616
    http://www.halfords.ie/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_11101_catalogId_15551_productId_525159_langId_-1_categoryId_212616
    http://www.halfords.ie/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_11101_catalogId_15551_productId_525117_langId_-1_categoryId_212616
    http://www.halfords.ie/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_11101_catalogId_15551_productId_199193_categoryId_212616_langId_-1?cm_sp=Intelligent_Offer-_-Product_List_Zone_1-_-Blank&iozone=PLPz1




  • So I attempted my first service yesterday and it didn't exactly go according to plan.

    Done the spark plugs first which was easy and also the air filter, then I jacked up the car and tried to turn the oil filter which did not budge as hard as I tried it wouldn't turn so thats that I may get an adjustable wrench to take it off. Bit disappointed with it tbh.

    I removed my filter the old fashioned way :) screwdriver straight threw it and give it few tips with a hammer:)

    got a lend of a filter remover (not sure the name but theres like a bicycle chain on it lol) no good at all it was on so tight :)


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  • Sorry if this is the wrong place to ask.

    How often should I need to change my fuel filter?
    I have an 02 Opel Agila and I don't know if its ever been done in the 105k miles.
    How do I do it if I need to do it?

    And further to my desperation to get better MPG, how do I clean my EGR valve? Its blocked off at the minute but I'm fed up looking at the light for it, so if I can clean it and reconnect it I'll be happy.

    And how do I clean battery terminals? Will a wire brush be enough?




  • depends how much you drive it. if you drive 150 miles + a week, then i wouldnt go any longer than 18 months really.
    As for the EGR valve, simply replace it, as cheap as they are you masewell because you cannot get to all of the parts, a cleaning may not last very long.




  • pudzey101 wrote: »
    depends how much you drive it. if you drive 150 miles + a week, then i wouldnt go any longer than 18 months really.
    As for the EGR valve, simply replace it, as cheap as they are you masewell because you cannot get to all of the parts, a cleaning may not last very long.
    A Min of 250 a week. So it needs doin soon so.
    Where is it and how do I change it?
    Its basically a corsa engine.

    How cheap are we talking? I was hearing they were over 100, thats why I was looking into cleaning.




  • pudzey101 wrote: »
    As for the EGR valve, simply replace it, as cheap as they are you masewell because you cannot get to all of the parts, a cleaning may not last very long.

    A new EGR for my VW would have been around €200:pac:




  • unlike a diesel engine a fuel filter replacement in a petrol engine like your opel is not required as often or will not cause majour problems if it is not changed, but saying that for proper engine performance you should look to change it every 50-60k

    and on another note anyone driving a diesel engine - even though the manufacturer sometimes gives a long period between change this should be not be followed and you should change it on a shorter interval because the quality of diesel is brutal in a lot places throughout ireland and for da few euros extra on filters it will save you in the long run preventing engine trouble


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  • Can anyone recommend a good place to service my Peugeot 206 in Cork city?




  • Theres lots of places doing the 100 euro oil change and safety check thing. Ring around for a price or do it yourself. Just an oil change is very simple.




  • So I attempted my first service yesterday and it didn't exactly go according to plan.

    Done the spark plugs first which was easy and also the air filter, then I jacked up the car and tried to turn the oil filter which did not budge as hard as I tried it wouldn't turn so thats that I may get an adjustable wrench to take it off. Bit disappointed with it tbh.

    If you get an old bicycle tyre and wrap it around the filter and then around a tyre wrench. Turn the tyre wrench to tighten the tyre around the filter. Then twist the whole lot. Does more are less the same job as the proper yolk.




  • Used this guide to do my first oil change on a 00 1.4 Corolla, which is also my first car.

    Emptying the oil was handy enough but that oil filter jaysus! It's like it was welded on, screwdriver through it didn't even work. A giant vice grips did though, crushed the living sh1t out of the little [email protected]




  • Is 5w/30 fully synthetic oil ok for a 03 Nissan Almera 1.5?




  • Recommended 5W/30 semi synthetic oil API/ACEA SJ/A3
    Fully synthetic is even better




  • pudzey101 wrote: »
    I removed my filter the old fashioned way :) screwdriver straight threw it and give it few tips with a hammer:)

    got a lend of a filter remover (not sure the name but theres like a bicycle chain on it lol) no good at all it was on so tight :)

    I would never remove a filter by that method, I have never had a problem removing a filter with any proper tool, I think maybe you weren't using the filter tool correctly or (and no offense but I've seen/heard people do this) maybe you were turning the wrong way and actually tightening it?
    if you are lying on your back and craning your neck back/upside down its possible to think ok, turn this way, hang on, no its the other way.
    Filter should not be put on that tight anyway if it was.

    What happens if you cant remove it and now have a filter stuck on but with two holes in it?? besides other possible problems?




  • Serviced my car for the first time today. Well I changed the oil and oil filter. I had done air filter, spark plugs, wipers, etc a while ago. The filter was a bit of a struggle before so I bought an oil filter wrench and it worked a treat. It's a 03 Almera, I have to say very little oil came out of the sump and when I refilled it only took around 3L.

    Next on my list is new tyres and a fog light!




  • Serviced my car for the first time today. Well I changed the oil and oil filter. I had done air filter, spark plugs, wipers, etc a while ago. The filter was a bit of a struggle before so I bought an oil filter wrench and it worked a treat. It's a 03 Almera, I have to say very little oil came out of the sump and when I refilled it only took around 3L.

    Next on my list is new tyres and a fog light!

    So long as you check the dipstick with the car on a level surface, 3 litres doesnt sound like enough to me but not certain, would have thought at least 4 maybe 4.5, if you have the owners manual take a look, but the dipstick will do the same job.




  • Merch wrote: »
    So long as you check the dipstick with the car on a level surface, 3 litres doesnt sound like enough to me but not certain, would have thought at least 4 maybe 4.5, if you have the owners manual take a look, but the dipstick will do the same job.
    Just looked it up there, it's actually 2.7 litres. :eek:


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  • yepp... 2.7 l. of oil.

    nissanalmera.jpg



    coolant, 6.7 litres :eek:




  • 2.7 well, thats a suprise to me :)
    Know someone with an Almera, they never mentioned that, I even had a haynes for it once, never noticed it either.
    2.7 with filter, well if thats what it is, I'd still buy in the 4-5 litre container size as its cheaper and leaves some for topping up if needed.




  • Has anybody tackled the front pads yet as I'm about to replace them myself.

    When it comes to pushing back the pistons do you have to buy the kit (link posted earlier) or would a G clamp and metal plate do the job.

    I've been told to compress them slowly so as not to turn the seals in the piston and a smearing of copper grease on the back of the pads where the piston contacts the metal backing plate and nowhere near front of pads or disk :)

    Anyway a walk through on this would be helpful if someone had the time.

    Great post volvo boy and nissan doctor.




  • I would only wind back the caliper piston if the pad was really worn (down near to metal). As the piston extends at the same rate as the pad wears. Winding the piston back can force brake fluid up into the resevoir fill cap. I open the bleed nipple on the caliper to relieve the pressure on the caliper seals, and just have a tube and bottle to collect the fluid.




  • leeomurchu wrote: »
    Has anybody tackled the front pads yet as I'm about to replace them myself.

    When it comes to pushing back the pistons do you have to buy the kit (link posted earlier) or would a G clamp and metal plate do the job.

    I've been told to compress them slowly so as not to turn the seals in the piston and a smearing of copper grease on the back of the pads where the piston contacts the metal backing plate and nowhere near front of pads or disk :)

    Anyway a walk through on this would be helpful if someone had the time.

    Great post volvo boy and nissan doctor.

    A metal plate(or the old pad) and a G clamp will work fine.

    The correct way to change pads is to clamp the brake hose and open the bleed nipple when pushing back the piston. This not only relieves pressure on the master cylinder but it bleeds the worst of the brake fluid(the brake fluid within the caliper will be subject to the most heat).

    If the new pads have anti rattle clips/plates on the rear then they shouldn't need copper grease but it will do no harm if you use it. A light covering on the rear of the pad and a small amount on the points where the pad slides on the caliper.

    When you have the caliper off check the seal around the piston for rips or other damage and check the caliper sliders move freely and evenly.

    What car is it BTW?




  • A metal plate(or the old pad) and a G clamp will work fine.

    The correct way to change pads is to clamp the brake hose and open the bleed nipple when pushing back the piston. This not only relieves pressure on the master cylinder but it bleeds the worst of the brake fluid(the brake fluid within the caliper will be subject to the most heat).

    If the new pads have anti rattle clips/plates on the rear then they shouldn't need copper grease but it will do no harm if you use it. A light covering on the rear of the pad and a small amount on the points where the pad slides on the caliper.

    When you have the caliper off check the seal around the piston for rips or other damage and check the caliper sliders move freely and evenly.

    What car is it BTW?

    It's actually 2 cars an 03 renault megane scenic 2 1.6 and an 02 VW polo.

    I've not got a brass washer to my name these days so needs must but reading this thread and your advice with pictures i'm feeling a bit more confident.

    Fair play to you by the way there's many who'd say F off and pay for a service in a garage. I appreciate any help and advice :)




  • leeomurchu wrote: »
    It's actually 2 cars an 03 renault megane scenic 2 1.6 and an 02 VW polo.

    I've not got a brass washer to my name these days so needs must but reading this thread and your advice with pictures i'm feeling a bit more confident.

    Fair play to you by the way there's many who'd say F off and pay for a service in a garage. I appreciate any help and advice :)


    You will need a 7mm hex/allen key to remove the caliper bolts on the Polo at least. Most socket sets don't incude one but you can get a specific caliper allen key in Halfords pretty cheap.




  • You will need a 7mm hex/allen key to remove the caliper bolts on the Polo at least. Most socket sets don't incude one but you can get a specific caliper allen key in Halfords pretty cheap.

    I got a loan of that big socket set halfords sell off a neighbour so hopefully it's in there. Do you know where the fuel filter is on either car as the polo has a bit of a stutter at idle.

    The Renaults a whole different kettle of fish great practical family car if only they put a little more effort in when building it. I've the 1.6 which has a known fault with a dephaser pulley so it sounds like a bag of spanners are in the cylinders on start up might take 2-3 goes to start I'll see about changing that when the timing belt needs doing (don't think I'd want to tackle that one)




  • It wont be, you'll have to buy it seperately, about €6 from halfords


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  • Good you had managed to do it alone through the help of that guide. Some people have always reason about not changing their own oil, which often get us wrong, weak and an excellent humiliation. In fact, Margaret Dunning, a 102-year-old retiree, still changes her very own oil and has been keeping her 1930 Packard running since she bought it 83 years ago. Indeed, one of the most incredible women Margaret Dunning, at 102, still changes her own oil.


    :cool:


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