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Psychology Professions

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  • Registered Users Posts: 243 ✭✭ Spartan09


    Hi, I'm aiming to do psychology after this year and for my post grad(obviously I don't know yet) but I think I might be interested in Forensic psych. If it turns out that that doesnt interest me, just wondering are there career options for a psychologists in working with people with special needs ie, down's syndrome, autism etc. If so what are they and what route in psychology do you go for them?


    Hi Anabel, you have a couple of options after the initial undergraduate. There's no way of specifically training as a Forensic Psychologist in Ireland. The vast majority of people working as a psychologist in a Forensic area in Ireland are clinically trained. A smaller number have completed training as chartered forensic psychologists in the UK or the North and have returned to Ireland to work here. The MSc in Forensic Psychology in UCC is a good course but its a taught course and doesnt qualify you to work as a forensic psychologist.

    If you are interested in working in the area of intellectual disability then I would again recommend Clinical and again this would represent the majority of psychologists working in the ID area and there are lots of jobs for Psychologists in this area.

    It is one of the core placements that you complete in training and if you were very interested in the area you could additionally complete your specialist placement in a setting for people with Autism. There would also be a number of Psychologists trained as Educational Psychologists working in the ID area also.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 118 ✭✭ irish-anabel


    Thanks Spartan that's really helpful :)
    What kind of careers are we talking about when working with the ID?


  • Registered Users Posts: 243 ✭✭ Spartan09


    Thanks Spartan that's really helpful :)
    What kind of careers are we talking about when working with the ID?


    Careers other than Psychology?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 118 ✭✭ irish-anabel


    No like working as a psychologist with ID people. I mean do you actually sit down with them or supervise in a school or what kind of thing?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1 Louisiana 2


    Hi I would appreciate any advice anyone could give me about getting into counselling as a career.
    I have just graduated with a BA psychology and now I'm doing a masters in rehabilitation and disability studies. I hope to get into a career as a counsellor eventually. Although the masters I am doing currently does not have much relevance to counselling it requires me to do a placement which i thought would give me good experience. I am training at the moment with a counselling helpline and in a month or so I will begin taking calls.
    Has anyone done the counselling psychology course in cork or TCD or could give me any info on it?
    I was considering doing a foundation course in counselling with some of the private counselling centres eg tivoli insititute- has anyone done this or recommend it?
    Thanks for any help anyone can give me!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 243 ✭✭ Spartan09


    No like working as a psychologist with ID people. I mean do you actually sit down with them or supervise in a school or what kind of thing?


    Psychologists working with individuals with intellectual disabilities perform quite a variety of roles, they would work in schools, supported employment centres, sheltered workshops, residential centres. The kind of work would include yes individual therapy with the person and or their families, the type of therapeutic approach would depend on what was appropriate to their particular difficulty and level of intellectual disability. Many individual therapies can be adapted for this area. You would also work on a multi-disciplinary level with other professions addressing areas such as challenging behaviour, communication, learning difficulties, mental health difficulties, it can be a challenging but also very rewarding area to work in, hope this helps.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,625 flyswatter


    Hi,

    I would really like to study psychology next year but have been put off it for several reasons. Both my consultant and a leading CBT therapist have told me that it is a bottleneck once you get your bachelors degree with so much competition for post degree training courses. The CBT guy even said that a psychology degree was a 'useless' degree because of the competition!

    Is it really that hard to get onto a training course in Ireland at this moment in time? Do you have to do a masters in psychology after the bachelors degree and then do your chosen training programme? Or should you just do the bachelors and do the training course?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.


  • Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 17,317 Mod ✭✭✭✭ The Black Oil


    Having a Masters mightn't even get your an interview, you'll need work experience (diverse) and perhaps research experience on top of that. Some applicants have to try 2 or 3 times before they're offered a place. I presume it's clinical you're on about. Competition is tough, yes, but maybe see if you can speak to someone who has gone through the system more recently.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus


    Hi I would appreciate any advice anyone could give me about getting into counselling as a career.
    I have just graduated with a BA psychology and now I'm doing a masters in rehabilitation and disability studies. I hope to get into a career as a counsellor eventually. Although the masters I am doing currently does not have much relevance to counselling it requires me to do a placement which i thought would give me good experience. I am training at the moment with a counselling helpline and in a month or so I will begin taking calls.
    Has anyone done the counselling psychology course in cork or TCD or could give me any info on it?
    I was considering doing a foundation course in counselling with some of the private counselling centres eg tivoli insititute- has anyone done this or recommend it?
    Thanks for any help anyone can give me!

    Since you already have a degree in psychology I would suggest staying in that area and looking at a counselling psychology Masters. Other options would be looking at the H Dips and Masters in DSB and The Independent College. TBH at your level I would think a foundation course would be a step backwards.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3 1tomtom


    Hi, I'm a 3rd year psychology student and I'm hoping to eventually get into clinical psychology, it seems to have the most demand and has many different area's of work so its the most appealing area of psychology for me. i've a relatively good pga, i think its almost 3.5 so far. From my understanding of clinical psychology, you need to have studied a masters program in a relevant subject. I'm hoping to get advice on what masters program to choose that will best enable me to eventually become a clinical psychologist.

    The open university offer a 3 year masters in general psychology, this course involves 60 credits on brain and behavior and the same in understanding childrens development and learning. This does seem relevant to the clinical program but it doesn't include any research project which i understand is important.

    The open university also offer a 3 year msc in psychology research methods, again this module doesn't require a dissertation and rather than a research masters its a taught masters on research methodology.

    Trinity and University of Ulster offer a course in applied behavior analysis which are 2 year long courses and involve placement work which could give me experience in working with children with id.

    Finally University of Ulster and nuig also have courses in health psychology that are 1 year long which would over lap with aspects of clinical psychology.

    Sorry for such a long winded post but if anyone has any information on any of these courses, or even in general about getting into clinical I'd appreciate it a lot.
    Thanks very much
    Tom


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  • Registered Users Posts: 263 ✭✭ marxcoo


    flyswatter wrote: »
    Hi,

    I would really like to study psychology next year but have been put off it for several reasons. Both my consultant and a leading CBT therapist have told me that it is a bottleneck once you get your bachelors degree with so much competition for post degree training courses. The CBT guy even said that a psychology degree was a 'useless' degree because of the competition!

    Is it really that hard to get onto a training course in Ireland at this moment in time? Do you have to do a masters in psychology after the bachelors degree and then do your chosen training programme? Or should you just do the bachelors and do the training course?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Do you mean clinical Postgrad when you refer to a post degree training courses? There are plenty of other paths you can go down with you primary degree other that clinical psychology and seeing as you haven't started the degree yet there's every chance that you will be attracted to some other aspect once you start studying. To refer to a psychology degree as 'useless' seems pretty flippant to me, it's up to you how you use your degree and psychology graduates go on to do all sorts of post grads and careers so the world is your oyster really!!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4 tripkat


    Hi folks,
    I'm 30 years old and working in Advertising. At this point I want a career change and would like to return to psychology. It's always been something I've been interested in. I studied it ten years ago (God, that makes me feel old) as a part of my undergraduate but missed out on getting into second year by the narrowest of margins. I was considering doing a course in counselling in the tivoli institute, however after discussing it with a number of people, I'm now considering doing a conversion course in Psychology. I've missed the deadlines for most, if not all of the Irish courses and am looking into studying it in the UK. In the UK, the conversion courses for the most part appear to be one year, whereas in Ireland, they're 2 years. Are they weighted equally in terms of being recognised by further courses, (most specifically the D.phil in Clinical Psychology). I know it's a long road. I know it's not easy, but it's something I'm now determined to do, and now that I've made my mind up, I'd like to do it in the most time-effective manner, but don't want to sacrifice quality for speed.
    If anyone has any suggestions or tips, I'd be eternally grateful.
    Thank you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,206 ✭✭✭ DGRulz


    Please don't troll or flame me for asking this but can anyone tell me anything about behavioral psychology or the use of micro expressions as seen in 'Lie to me' on tv. I've looked into it and it is a real thing but can anyone tell me any more on either subject??


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 95 ✭✭✭ mollymascara


    DGRulz wrote: »
    Please don't troll or flame me for asking this but can anyone tell me anything about behavioral psychology or the use of micro expressions as seen in 'Lie to me' on tv. I've looked into it and it is a real thing but can anyone tell me any more on either subject??

    I did a very short course on Behavioural Studies. Heres a link if you want a quick read from a website http://psychology.about.com/od/behavioralpsychology/tp/behavioral-psychology-basics.htm

    micro expressions, as far as Im aware relates to our body language, and what we can tell about a person from the body language, that being how they sit - arms folded, legs crossed etc. When we look at micro expressions, we are looking at the fleeting facial expressions people may use to surpress an emtion.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,206 ✭✭✭ DGRulz


    Would behavioural studies be covered in a BA? or would you have to go to a Masters for it, if so what masters Clinical, Forensic ect would contain the most behavioural studies.

    The same question applies to the micro expressions. Can I assume there's nothing in Ireland relating to it ?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 95 ✭✭✭ mollymascara


    DGRulz wrote: »
    Would behavioural studies be covered in a BA? or would you have to go to a Masters for it, if so what masters Clinical, Forensic ect would contain the most behavioural studies.

    The same question applies to the micro expressions. Can I assume there's nothing in Ireland relating to it ?

    Im not too familiar with the microexpressions, but the behavioural side is generally incorporated as part of a BA Psych, http://www.acd.ie/course.jsp?id=1 as an example. I am going to do the Psych Degree with DBS in Sept, so im not enitrely up on what different courses/colleges offer as part of their curriculum, but most college website have a Psych Dept, best bet would be to email one direct IMO.

    I did a Forensic and Criminal Psychology short coures also, and was told by the Frensic Psych thhat you first need to do a degree in psych then you may go on and do an MA in Forensic side if you wish but as far as she was aware, the course is not avail in Ireland, can be done through UK


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,206 ✭✭✭ DGRulz


    Cool thanks for the info :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1 sliabh bawn


    Hi

    I've just finished a HDip in Psychology and was wondering if anyone had any tips / ideas for ways I could go now. Enjoyed it all but really can't go in to a masters now, need to get working for a bit but would like something relevant. Anyone any suggestions?
    Perhaps you could send your CV to Ability West in Blackrock House, Salthill, Galway


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ Denter


    Would attaining a psychology degree through an arts course cause employers to think less of you? As opposed to someone who got the points and went straight into an psychology course..


  • Registered Users Posts: 101 ✭✭ Velvety


    As long as its accredited by the PSI, they'll be viewed equally. The BA in psychology in the Dublin Business School is accredited- no points required!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,856 ✭✭✭ Valmont


    Velvety wrote: »
    As long as its accredited by the PSI, they'll be viewed equally. The BA in psychology in the Dublin Business School is accredited- no points required!
    There are points requirements. HETAC has a minimum of 235 or something like that. If you do not get the HETAC point requirements and do the degree then it will not be accredited by HETAC. This is an important point!


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,856 ✭✭✭ Valmont


    Denter wrote: »
    Would attaining a psychology degree through an arts course cause employers to think less of you? As opposed to someone who got the points and went straight into an psychology course..
    So long as you get a good degree and have good grades, I don't think it will matter too much. Remember though, if you have a 2.1 and are applying for a masters in Trinity, their own 2.1 graduates will be in ahead of you. Make sure you get involved with some voluntary work or help out the student branch of the PSI or something. Basically, anything that can put you ahead of someone with a similar degree band.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10 ✭✭✭ Maggie Fuing


    Hi,
    I was just wondering if anyone has any advice and/or thoughts about the new psychology course in DCU?

    I have finished the first year of the integrated children's and general nursing course in DCU but have applied for the psychology course instead. I understand that it is being run through the science faculty not the through the usual arts and has not yet received accreditation.

    Thank you


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,861 ✭✭✭ JuliusCaesar


    flyswatter wrote: »
    The CBT guy even said that a psychology degree was a 'useless' degree because of the competition!.

    :eek:

    A psychology degree is never useless!

    People from my undergrad degree went on to do all sorts of jobs: social work, advertising, youth worker, musician. A small minority went on to do post grad in psychology - occupational, clinical, research.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,206 ✭✭✭ DGRulz


    Hi, I've failed to get into an Undergrad course and forced to take Computer Applications in DCU it works out as a teaching degree. Do I have any options left that would let me become a Psychologist??


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,327 ✭✭✭ hotspur


    DGRulz wrote: »
    Hi, I've failed to get into an Undergrad course and forced to take Computer Applications in DCU it works out as a teaching degree. Do I have any options left that would let me become a Psychologist??

    Get your degree, afterwards do a 2 year H.Dip conversion in psychology, and then you will be academically eligible for postgraduate psychology courses and a career in psychology.


  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭✭ Katie Kaboom


    hotspur wrote: »
    Get your degree, afterwards do a 2 year H.Dip conversion in psychology, and then you will be academically eligible for postgraduate psychology courses and a career in psychology.

    Hi :) Does that go for Business Studies degree aswell and how well do you have to do in your degree yr to get in to Psychology? Do you know where I could do just a H.Dip in Psychology after I get my business degree? Cause I called over to NUIG psyc faculty dept today to ask if I could get into Psychology after getting my Business Degree and I was told that I would have to start from scratch, I would have to go into 1st yr Arts and go from there as my degree will have had nothing to do with Psychology.

    I am really upset as I really want to get into Counselling Psychology. By the way I'm 30 and I understand it will take a long time, I've prob left it too late, but I still really want to do this.

    Does anyone know if my Business Degree will count for anything if I want to get into Psychology?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,327 ✭✭✭ hotspur


    Hi :) Does that go for Business Studies degree aswell and how well do you have to do in your degree yr to get in to Psychology? Do you know where I could do just a H.Dip in Psychology after I get my business degree? Cause I called over to NUIG psyc faculty dept today to ask if I could get into Psychology after getting my Business Degree and I was told that I would have to start from scratch, I would have to go into 1st yr Arts and go from there as my degree will have had nothing to do with Psychology.

    I am really upset as I really want to get into Counselling Psychology. By the way I'm 30 and I understand it will take a long time, I've prob left it too late, but I still really want to do this.

    Does anyone know if my Business Degree will count for anything if I want to get into Psychology?

    The whole purpose of 2 year H.Dip psychology courses is to educate people with any other degree in psychology up to undergraduate level. However, looking at the PSI website, I think Galway might have a different H.Dip which is a 1 year add on for their 3 year degree in psychological studies to get it up to single honours level BA in psychology level. So this isn't the course you're looking for.

    You can do a conversion HDip in psychology in TCD, UCD, UCC, OU, and DBS that I know of.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus



    I am really upset as I really want to get into Counselling Psychology. By the way I'm 30 and I understand it will take a long time, I've prob left it too late, but I still really want to do this.

    This is true more for psychotherapy than psychology, however, whilst it may not be as common within psychology as psychotherapy, a lot of people don't start training in therapeutics until they are more mature. I know of plenty of people who didn't start their studies until the where in their late twenties and older. I know a few therapists who where over fifty when they started. So whilst training as a counselling psychologist is a long road; don't let your age put you off.

    I started to train as a therapist in my late twenties, it was regularly said to me by clients [who were older than me at the time] that I was very young to be doing the job. Whilst I don't believe that to be the case, I know people younger than me at the time came across similar comments. Even if you didn't qualify until you are forty; that means you have over 25+ years left to work in a career you are interested in


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  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭✭ Katie Kaboom


    Thanks for the reply's they have given me hope :) I'm going to go back over to NUIG tomor and talk to the head of Psyc to see if she can help me.
    I live in Galway so I just want to see if she know of anyway I can do this without having to go too far I wouldn't mind commuting and if I have to go to Dublin I will, but she might know of some way of doing this closer to Galway. I know I could try Open University but I don't think I would do very well with it but then again if it comes to it I will try it.
    I'll let ye know how I get on.
    Thanks again :)


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