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Psychology Professions

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  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭✭ Katie Kaboom


    Hi All

    Can someone tell me what the difference between a Clinical Psychologist and Councilling Psychologist is?

    I was told by a Psychology lecturer the other day that a clinical psychologist does not prescribe drugs he justs works closely with the psychiatrist and knows the difference between different drugs and what they're for. But I thought that Clinical psychologists did perscribe drugs and that was the diff between a councilling Psychologist and clinical psychologist, but turns out this isn't true. So what is the difference?

    And could you train as a councilling Psychologist and then do a top up course to be a qualified clinical psychologist later?

    Any insight is appreciated :)

    Thanks


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,327 ✭✭✭ hotspur


    A clinical psychologist will generally train more in the line of working with serious mental illnesses, learning disability, neurological problems etc.

    A counselling psychologist (though the 2 are coming ever closer together to the point of being blurred) will generally tend to work with clients manifesting less significant pathology or impairment.

    They are educationally distinct careers with their own doctorates, you can't top up counselling psychology to become a clinical psychologist.

    Neither prescribe drugs in this country. Clinical psychologists can prescribe drugs in some States in America. That was never the source of the distinction anywhere though. That is the distinction between a psychologist and a psychiatrist.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus


    Hi All

    Can someone tell me what the difference between a Clinical Psychologist and Councilling Psychologist is?

    I was told by a Psychology lecturer the other day that a clinical psychologist does not prescribe drugs he justs works closely with the psychiatrist and knows the difference between different drugs and what they're for. But I thought that Clinical psychologists did perscribe drugs and that was the diff between a councilling Psychologist and clinical psychologist, but turns out this isn't true. So what is the difference?

    And could you train as a councilling Psychologist and then do a top up course to be a qualified clinical psychologist later?

    Any insight is appreciated :)

    Thanks

    No psychologist prescribes drugs, tbh I don't know/why a psych lecturer would say that. A clinical paych would work more closely with a psyciatrist, often a bad description of one is of a clinical psych a diagnostic tool for the psych, but they do much more than psychometeric/diagnostic tests evaulatioms etc. I will let our psych people explain the difference in a better way than I can.


  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭✭ Katie Kaboom


    Thanks Hotspur and Odysseus for replying :)

    From your answers I'm thinking Clinical Psychology is the path to follow because they may have more job prospects seeing as they deal with specific problems. What do you think?

    Would OCD patients go to clinical Psychologists?
    Would child abuse patients go to councilling psychologists?
    Because I'm interested in helping both... or could they go to either?
    Odysseus wrote: »
    No psychologist prescribes drugs, tbh I don't know/why a psych lecturer would say that.

    The Lecturer didn't say that a clinical psychologist prescribes drugs he said that they didn't. I previously thought they did....


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,861 ✭✭✭ JuliusCaesar


    Would OCD patients go to clinical Psychologists?
    Would child abuse patients go to councilling psychologists?
    Because I'm interested in helping both... or could they go to either?

    They could go to either. In the case of the OCD person, let's hope they go to someone with a good grasp of CBT.... not necessarily the case for either.

    Have a look at PSI or BPS websites - they'll give you more information about the different Psychology professions. Or even do a search on this forum. There's plenty of information.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭✭ Katie Kaboom


    They could go to either. In the case of the OCD person, let's hope they go to someone with a good grasp of CBT.... not necessarily the case for either.

    Have a look at PSI or BPS websites - they'll give you more information about the different Psychology professions. Or even do a search on this forum. There's plenty of information.

    Will do. Thanks :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4 somewhere


    Hi I 've been giving a great deal of thought to becoming a counsellor for many years. I have however left it rather late. I am 41 and a mother of three. I've become through research very aware of the length and breadth of the field of practice and study. My question is this if I were to take on a 4 year degree or diploma programme with an accreditted private college would I be taking a worthwhile path as I have no degree. Also does anyone know how valid accreditation with the CPCAB would be.
    Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 60 ✭✭✭ kateof


    somewhere wrote: »
    Hi I 've been giving a great deal of thought to becoming a counsellor for many years. I have however left it rather late. I am 41 and a mother of three. I've become through research very aware of the length and breadth of the field of practice and study. My question is this if I were to take on a 4 year degree or diploma programme with an accreditted private college would I be taking a worthwhile path as I have no degree. Also does anyone know how valid accreditation with the CPCAB would be.
    Thanks.

    Have you considered doing a foundation course in psychotherapy? It should give you some very basic skills and a better understanding of the profession. Also, at the end of it, you will have a notion of whether its the right path for you.
    41 is not old for this kind of work. Life experience is critical so age is generally considered valuable (that's not to say that a younger person cant have extensive life experience!)
    You may find it difficult to juggle 3 children and study? Only you will be the judge of that. Good luck with whatever you decide.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4 somewhere


    Thanks Kateof. I am presently looking at either the IICP in Killinarden, turningpoint in Dunlaoighre for foundation courses or PCI. Also Churchtown counselling are commencing a course in September a BA in psychotherapy and counselling its brand new though and accreditted by the Counselling and Pyschotherapy Central Awarding Body in the UK. The degree is run with the OU and does not require a foundation course. Its a mine field and whatever I choose I want to be sure I'm taking the right path.


  • Registered Users Posts: 60 ✭✭✭ kateof


    Hi Somewhere,
    Go for it, tho it might be no harm to check irish accreditation for the OU BA course. It's no harm to think about where you will get your referrals from when you do finally qualify!! Kateof


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus


    somewhere wrote: »
    Thanks Kateof. I am presently looking at either the IICP in Killinarden, turningpoint in Dunlaoighre for foundation courses or PCI. Also Churchtown counselling are commencing a course in September a BA in psychotherapy and counselling its brand new though and accreditted by the Counselling and Pyschotherapy Central Awarding Body in the UK. The degree is run with the OU and does not require a foundation course. Its a mine field and whatever I choose I want to be sure I'm taking the right path.

    As metioned above check out which body the OU course would entitle you to membership with. The others are covered by the IACP I think. As for your age I have studied with and taugh students older than me and I'm the same age, so don't worry about the age thing.

    You got plenty of time until the start of the next semester so go for it, use the time to find out more about the courses, and of course don't be afaird to ask questions here. Best of luck with it.

    Just be careful with new courses, they may not be accredited until after the course has finished, which is fine if things go well, but if they don't you may have a problem. Being a member of a profession body is essential, so make sure the course will get you entery and I never heard of CPCAB. So make sure you check that out. A girl in my clinic in her second year in Killnarden and is very pleased with the standard, but check out the others.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4 somewhere


    Thank you for that. Killinarden does look very good and I can apply there for a foundation course first which is a requirement. Tha DBS course looks good too. Both PCI and DBS have open evenings tomorrow unfortunate clash but I'll try both. PCI appears to be in line with the IACP but the course itself is not accreditated. I do have concerns re Churchtown as it is untested cheaper and a different approach to training. This a huge step and I want get it right if for no other reason than the fact that I wish to be well trained in the right way. I may well apply to Killinarden and jump in to the foundation course as it all seems to be well grounded. :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4 somewhere


    Well many thanks to all for the input last year and Odysseus I did indeed take the cert course at IICP in Killinarden and am loving it. I plan to apply to take the diploma in September.


  • Registered Users Posts: 601 Lucario


    Does anyone know how to become a Neuropsychologist? and also what it would entail? i.e. Studying people who have brain injuries and such or actually working with them. Is there a specific Masters/PhD that I could do in order to work as one or would I need to go down the Clinical route?


  • Registered Users Posts: 960 Blueskye


    The only neuropsychologists I know have done the Doctoral programme in Clinical Psychology and have then done the masters in neuropsychology in Glasgow.


  • Registered Users Posts: 830 ✭✭✭ Slo_Rida


    Hi all
    I'm totally new to this area and know squat about about psychology...I'm an engineer. I am asking a question on behalf of my sister. She has a Fetac (level 6 I think) qualification in child care. But she is really frustrated working in the creche. She is amazing with children, that's not a biassed opinion, I promise. I have heard about play therapy and she has a huge interest in child psychology and the role of play in their development. She often shows up at my house with things like material...lace/silk/velvet/sandpaper etc to 'play' with my own son. And if she doesn't have that stuff, she will use water or anything and it really gets him clued into her (he has just turned one). That's the background, apologies for the length.

    My question is, what is the most recognised organisation for her to join or apply to or enquire with? There is play therapy ireland, childrens therapy centre etc, it seems the latter is fetac/hetac reg'd but the former sounds like the official body in Ireland but lacks the fetac/hetac thing. Can someone please shed some light on this for us please. Also, academics is not her strong point so out-and-out psychology is not an option unfortunately. If you have any other suggestions as to a path she could take that would be great.

    Thanks in advance,
    Anthony


  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭✭ Katie Kaboom


    Hi I'm just wondering if there are any organisational psychologists on this forum and if anyone knows if there are many jobs in Ireland in this area? Also wondering if anyone knows a good way of going about getting into the profession?

    I should say I'm currently doing a 2 year h.dip in psychology and have a business degree already .

    I'm going to email an org psych consultancy agency to see if they need any interns or anything for the summer and then hopefully get a job within the org psych field and do a masters in org psych in UL (hopefully) once in employment. Then maybe years ahead in the future I could do my doctorate to get into clinical. I'm 32 atm.

    Just wondering what people think of that idea or am I dreaming....


  • Registered Users Posts: 960 Blueskye


    Slo_Rida wrote: »
    Hi all
    I'm totally new to this area and know squat about about psychology...I'm an engineer. I am asking a question on behalf of my sister. She has a Fetac (level 6 I think) qualification in child care. But she is really frustrated working in the creche. She is amazing with children, that's not a biassed opinion, I promise. I have heard about play therapy and she has a huge interest in child psychology and the role of play in their development. She often shows up at my house with things like material...lace/silk/velvet/sandpaper etc to 'play' with my own son. And if she doesn't have that stuff, she will use water or anything and it really gets him clued into her (he has just turned one). That's the background, apologies for the length.

    My question is, what is the most recognised organisation for her to join or apply to or enquire with? There is play therapy ireland, childrens therapy centre etc, it seems the latter is fetac/hetac reg'd but the former sounds like the official body in Ireland but lacks the fetac/hetac thing. Can someone please shed some light on this for us please. Also, academics is not her strong point so out-and-out psychology is not an option unfortunately. If you have any other suggestions as to a path she could take that would be great.

    Thanks in advance,
    Anthony

    I have only had experience with http://www.childrenstherapycentre.ie/ but find Eileen Prenderville excellent. They run a variety of different courses (short weekend ones and longer masters and diploma courses) and a lot of the learning is 'experiential' rather than academic. I have no connection to the centre by the way, but I have attended courses with CTC for professional development.


  • Registered Users Posts: 31 ✭✭✭ Dr. Nooooo!


    Just about finished an undergrad in law. Want to study psychology and forge a career in that area. I plan to do a 2 year Hdip conversion course starting Autumn 2014. Want to use the year out to save up, but also want to do a shorter part time course in the area during this time in order to give me a leg up and experience some study in this area to make sure that it is actually for me and that I like the reality, and not just the idea I have of it. Can anyone recommend such a course in Dublin? 1500 would be the absolute max I could afford, the cheaper the better however.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14 ✭✭✭ roxy21


    Hi,

    Im currently studying with the childrens therapy centre and I am enjoying every minute of it. Theres a variety of courses available to choose from. If your sister wabted she could do a starter course to get the taste of what the centre and other courses have to offer.

    I am on The MA programme and this is HETAC accredited.
    The lectureres are all working in the field and have a wealth of knowledge behind them. Its very experiential which makes it easier to understand etc...I cannot praise it enough really. There is obviously a nice expensive tied onto it, but I think when you are passionate about something and your career, its worth it in the long run.
    Hope this helps.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9 ✭✭✭ ellabella1


    Hi all

    I am 31 and have decided to do a degree in psychology as a mature student. It is quite likely that I will be able to avail of a career break next yr if i wish to take on college full time thou I dont know how I will survive financially! Anyhow looking for advice on my options..

    I see that ucd offer 3yr BA course as opposed to DCU & Maynooth for 4 yr Bsc. Does the Bsc carry more weight when it comes to further study or employment or is there some other significant difference?

    Also instead of waiting one more year to begin, I see that DBS do a part time BA course (app 7 hrs class per wk). I could try and work a 4 day wk and do this part-time, depending on how much study is required weekly?? Finally does anybody know if I undertook 1st year part time & decided to go full time after, would the other colleges allow me straight into 2nd year of their course. Any advice would be much appreciated;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,735 dar100


    ellabella1 wrote: »
    Hi all

    I am 31 and have decided to do a degree in psychology as a mature student. It is quite likely that I will be able to avail of a career break next yr if i wish to take on college full time thou I dont know how I will survive financially! Anyhow looking for advice on my options..

    I see that ucd offer 3yr BA course as opposed to DCU & Maynooth for 4 yr Bsc. Does the Bsc carry more weight when it comes to further study or employment or is there some other significant difference?

    Also instead of waiting one more year to begin, I see that DBS do a part time BA course (app 7 hrs class per wk). I could try and work a 4 day wk and do this part-time, depending on how much study is required weekly?? Finally does anybody know if I undertook 1st year part time & decided to go full time after, would the other colleges allow me straight into 2nd year of their course. Any advice would be much appreciated;)

    If you already hold a BA you can do a two year conversion H dip in psychology that is equal to a BA


  • Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 17,321 Mod ✭✭✭✭ The Black Oil


    UCD Psychology Dept have a couple of videos on their clinical doctorate. Worth a look.



    More here.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/PsychologyUCD/videos


  • Registered Users Posts: 9 ✭✭✭ ellabella1


    Sadly I only have a level 7 BA, so its the long haul ahead for me.. probably the 4 year part time route... Thanks anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,831 ✭✭✭✭ endacl


    ellabella1 wrote: »
    Sadly I only have a level 7 BA, so its the long haul ahead for me.. probably the 4 year part time route... Thanks anyway.

    What do you want to do with the degree when you finish? There may be several routes to the same destination.


  • Registered Users Posts: 62 ✭✭✭ Hello 1996


    Hello!
    I am just after finishing TY and I would love to study psychology in college. What 5th year subjects would anyone recommend taking?


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,831 ✭✭✭✭ endacl


    Hello 1996 wrote: »
    Hello!
    I am just after finishing TY and I would love to study psychology in college. What 5th year subjects would anyone recommend taking?
    Not a smart answer...

    ...Take the ones that you're good at and enjoy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 62 ✭✭✭ Hello 1996


    endacl wrote: »
    Not a smart answer...

    ...Take the ones that you're good at and enjoy.

    Is there any that would make studying psychology easier?:)


  • Registered Users Posts: 601 Lucario


    Hello 1996 wrote: »
    Is there any that would make studying psychology easier?:)

    The only subject I thought that helped (quite a bit, actually) for Psychology was Biology, as I knew the very basics of my Biological Psychology module and when it came to studying I didn't need to study that aspect as much since I had most of it drilled into my brain for the Leaving Cert :P However, if you don't want to do Biology, then don't. Absolutely I agree with doing what subjects you enjoy the most over what will be beneficial to you, it will make studying and exams a lot more bearable.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 21,831 ✭✭✭✭ endacl


    Hello 1996 wrote: »
    Is there any that would make studying psychology easier?:)

    Maybe maths? Psychology at undergrad is fond of the auld statistics. But as maths is compulsory, it doesn't really help with your question....

    Honestly, just do what you like and are strong at.


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