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[Info] Sleep Clinics in Ireland/Sleep disorders

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  • Registered Users Posts: 25,243 ✭✭✭✭Jesus Wept


    Also have had bad gp experiences, last time (a year ago) I went and without knowing I had it, I perfectly described all the symptoms of Non-24, I didn't know it had a name at the time.
    She laughed and told me to set an alarm.

    I emailed St James sleep clinic 6 weeks ago and they didn't even respond (have re-emailed them asking why as of today).

    Unfortunately, when searching for 'Sleep disorder clinics Ireland', it seems the only thing they talk about is sleep apnea. :-/
    What a frustrating country.

    The only place that may be of could be of help is The Mater Private, though I shudder to think of the cost. Also deflating is that it doesn't sound like treatments are often effective.

    I think I may have started out with DSPS.


  • Registered Users Posts: 356 ✭✭MarcinG


    Hi.
    St. vincents has a sleep aponea clinics on Wednesdays.
    And as quick as i can i will get my appointment there (need to get medical card first).
    you can ring guy from irish sleep aponea trust - he seems to be very helpful.
    number is on their web page.

    I was badly snoring since I can remember but never had a problem with it.
    But when i movet to Ireland something happened (i got "extra 30kg" or it was less active life (i use to do around 10-15k km on bike every year) or something with climate here (mould in bathroom? who knows?), but after about 2 years i couldn't drive a car any more - i was falling asleep every few hours - first impression was that this is job related (i was working 8-16h daily 5 days a week).
    I swapped job but problems were still there. At worst time (around 2,5 - 3 years ago) i couldn't drive from bray to airport with less than 2 naps on the way - same with attending meetings - i was asleep after 3 minutes i even managed to fall asleep behind table while had my dinner - woke up at 5 am still sitting and dressed with plate in front of me). i looked over internet and find out that i have sleep aponea and went to gp to get letter to st. vincent but they said that nearest appointment can be set i 6 mths time!!!
    so i went to poland (i'm polish) and got ENT surgery done (do not do it!!! i just trusted their commercials)
    it helped perfectly. for a year.... now i'm back with my problems.
    CPAP doesn't work on me (at some stage after few hours of sleep i'm starting chocking (like pressure in cpap was to high to allow me to breath out air from my lungs) and i have to remove mask, switch cpap off, put mask back on and so with cpap + drink some water as my throat is dust dry (this is not much better than no sleep from sa).
    ps. on some occasions i managed to stop breathing for over 3minutes (my wife used stop watch on me once).
    is there any one who had similar problem with cpap?
    so far (apart from related expenses) i spent around 2-3k euro (number of checks, cpap, surgery) and have no results....


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5 CloseYourMouth


    Here, we examine the literature to determine whether rhinitis, chronic overbreathing and sleeping with the mouth open is a causal factor for snoring and sleep apnoea.
    “Open-mouth breathing during sleep is a risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and is associated with increased disease severity and upper airway collapsibility.” The study which involved 52 patients found that “the more elongated and narrow upper airway during open-mouth breathing may aggravate the collapsibility of the upper airway and, thus, negatively affect OSA severity.”1
    In another study, 385 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea were examined through a questionnaire. Results showed that upper airway symptoms were common, with 61% of patients reporting mouth dryness, 52% with nasal stuffiness, 51% with dryness of the nose, 30% with sneezing, 24% with mucus in the throat, and 17% with a runny nose.2
    Ohki et al. performed a study to determine the relationship between oral breathing and nasal obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The study involved 30 normal subjects and 20 patients with snoring or sleep apnoea. Researchers found that chronic nasal obstruction and resultant mouth breathing may induce obstructive sleep apnea.3
    In a paper entitled, “How does open-mouth breathing influence upper airway anatomy?”4, Lee et al. tested the hypothesis that open-mouth breathing during sleep may increase the severity of obstructive sleep apnea. After an analysis of 28 patients, researchers concluded that “open-mouth breathing is associated with reduction of the retropalatal and retroglossal areas, lengthening of the pharynx and shortening of the MP-H in the upper airway.”4
    After reviewing texts and articles on Medline, the centre for research disorders in Cincinnati, Ohio concluded that obstructive sleep apnoea, sleep fragmentation, and disturbed sleep often result from nasal obstruction.5 The authors of the paper observed that “since breathing through the nose appears to be the preferred route during sleep, nasal obstruction frequently leads to nocturnal mouth breathing, snoring, and ultimately to OSA.”5 The paper advised that allergic rhinitis and other upper respiratory disorders should be treated more aggressively.5
    Mouth breathing, snoring, and sleep apnoea in children
    A Polish study noted that children with sleep respiratory disorders wake up tired, with blocked noses, were breathing through their mouth, tire easily, have concentration problems, are irritated, and demonstrate hyperactivity that may resemble ADHD symptoms. The paper further states that “long-term disease leads to exacerbation of all-systemic symptoms, results in cardiovascular complications, induces developmental inhibition and cognitive dysfunction, and is responsible for school/social failures and reduced life quality.”6
    In a paper entitled, “The nose and sleep disordered breathing: what we know and what we don’t know,” performed an analysis of medical literature on the subject.7 The analysis confirmed that “SDB (sleep disordered breathing) can both result from and be worsened by nasal obstruction.” It was stated that “nasal congestion typically results in a switch to oronasal breathing that compromises the airway.” Furthermore, “oral (mouth) breathing in children may lead to the development of facial structural abnormalities associated with SDB.” The paper concluded that the change to mouth breathing that occurs with chronic nasal obstruction is a common pathway for sleep-disordered breathing.7
    Mouth breathing was also recognised to be a factor in a study to determine the prevalence and association of sleep disorders and school performance. Based on a total of 1,164 completed questionnaires on children aged between 7 and 13 years, it was found that the overall prevalence of snoring was 38.9% with 3.5% habitually snoring. “Allergic symptoms, daytime mouth breathing, shaking the child for apnea, restless sleep and hyperactivity were significant and independent risk factors and sleep-related symptoms for HS.”9
    A study was conducted to determine the risk factors of habitual snoring and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing. Based on a study of 1030 children aged from 12 to 17 years, it was found that “habitual snorers had significantly more night time symptoms including observed apneas, difficulty breathing, restless sleep and mouth breathing during sleep compared to occasional and non-snorers.”10
    And finally, data from 248 medical charts of mouth-breathing children were analysed to determine the prevalence of obstructive sleep disorders in such children. It was found that 58% of children were primary snorers and 42% had obstructive sleep apnoea. The paper concluded that, “primary snoring and OSAS are frequent findings in mouth breathing children.”11
    There is no doubt that mouth breathing is a significant causal factor for snoring and sleep apnea in both adults and children.
    References:
    • Kim EJ, Choi JH, Kim KW, Kim TH, Lee SH, Lee HM, Shin C, Lee KY, Lee SH.
      The impacts of open-mouth breathing on upper airway space in obstructive sleep apnea: 3-D MDCT analysis.Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2010 Oct 19.
    • Kreivi HR, Virkkula P, Lehto J, Brander P.Frequency of upper airway symptoms before and during continuous positive airway pressure treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Respiration. 2010;80(6):488-94.
    • Ohki M, Usui N, Kanazawa H, Hara I, Kawano K. Relationship between oral breathing and nasal obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1996;523:228-30.
    • Lee SH, Choi JH, Shin C, Lee HM, Kwon SY, Lee SH.How does open-mouth breathing influence upper airway anatomy? Laryngoscope. 2007 Jun;117(6):1102-6.
    • Scharf MB, Cohen AP Diagnostic and treatment implications of nasal obstruction in snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1998 Oct;81(4):279-87; quiz 287-90.
    • Wasilewska J, Kaczmarski M Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children [Article in Polish] Wiad Lek. 2010;63(3):201-12.
    • Rappai M, Collop N, Kemp S, deShazo R. The nose and sleep-disordered breathing: what we know and what we do not know. Chest. 2003 Dec;124(6):2309-23.
    • Izu SC, Itamoto CH, Pradella-Hallinan M, Pizarro GU, Tufik S, Pignatari S, Fujita RR. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in mouth breathing children. [Article in English, Portuguese] Braz J Otorhinolaryngol. 2010 Oct;76(5):552-6.
    • Sahin U, Ozturk O, Ozturk M, Songur N, Bircan A, Akkaya A. Habitual snoring in primary school children: prevalence and association with sleep-related disorders and school performance. Med Princ Pract. 2009;18(6):458-65. Epub 2009 Sep 30.
    • Sogut A, Yilmaz O, Dinc G, Yuksel H, Prevalence of habitual snoring and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing in adolescents. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2009 Dec;73(12):1769-73. Epub 2009 Oct 20.
    • Izu SC, Itamoto CH, Pradella-Hallinan M, Pizarro GU, Tufik S, Pignatari S, Fujita RR. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in mouth breathing children.[Article in English, Portuguese] Braz J Otorhinolaryngol. 2010 Oct;76(5):552-6.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,243 ✭✭✭✭Jesus Wept


    fml. When are they going to start helping people who aren't having problems that would be resolved by losing excess weight?

    ffs


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5 CloseYourMouth


    The-Rigger wrote: »
    fml. When are they going to start helping people who aren't having problems that would be resolved by losing excess weight?

    ffs

    Sleep apnoea affects all size, not just overweight. The first question I would ask anyone with sleep apnoea is

    Do you have nasal obstruction?
    Do you sleep on your back?
    Do you sleep with your mouth open?

    If so, you need to address these first!


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1 BandiTee650


    I am so relieved to see someone else out there understands the frustration involved in searching for help with insomnia & getting info on sleep apnoea all the time. Also, medical professionals trying to push antidepressants on you because you don't sleep & seemingly the only reason for this is depression.
    I have suffered with this for years, this being laying awake night after night, all night, and on the 3rd or 4th morning I will fall asleep. This is not sleep apnoea or depression. I am not depressed. very upsetting& confusing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 108 ✭✭Alfasud


    Does anybody have a problem whereby they think they are awake but are told they have been snoring?


  • Registered Users Posts: 356 ✭✭MarcinG


    Alfasud wrote: »
    Does anybody have a problem whereby they think they are awake but are told they have been snoring?

    Snoring is (what i understand) caused by relaxed throat tissue which is flapping inside your throat as you breathing. If you falling asleep/did not woke up completely you throat muscles may be relaxed enough to cause snoring. Alcohol doesn't help as it relaxes muscles even further (my snoring is way worst after alcohol).


  • Posts: 0 ✭✭ [Deleted User]


    :( I can't sleep sometimes for many hours after going to bed each night, I'm physically tired, it could be 9.30pm/11pm/2am it dosn't matter...my usual bed time is 10pm but often its 1am before I start to drop off which leaves me so tired the next day...I'm a working Mom with all the normal stresses of life and I'd call myself a worrier but how I would love to just numb my mind and fall into a peaceful sleep when I go to bed!:(....I have taken both natural and prescribed sleeping tablets in the past but even they don't work now.....any suggestions would be great...I've started Horlicks an hour before bed, switching off tv/computer/reading/mediatation/covering my eyes/ear plugs......everything!! tired of being tired.......


  • Registered Users Posts: 37,965 ✭✭✭✭eagle eye


    First time posting in this thread. I suffer from Sleep Apnoea. I finally, after lots of medical tests, found out about this in 2005. I used to be a very loud snorer and when I went on a session I could go all night or fall asleep after a couple of pints. Now I can outlast the best of drinkers. About twelve months ago I got a new mask and a couple of weeks later I started to suffer from colds and flu's. This went on for about 11 months before I even thought it could have something to do with the new mask. I only realised it in the middle of January and started to use the old mask. Since then my health has improved and I have not had any cold and I've felt better than I did at anytime in the last twelve months or so.

    One other thing is that people should keep up to date on things. Please tell anybody you think may suffer from Sleep Apnoea to get tested for it. I was so happy that its been discovered after reading this.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120904100149.htm


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  • Registered Users Posts: 28,292 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    I have complained of tiredness at various times over a number of years, but in the last approximately 2 or 3 years it has been more noticeable, and now over the last 3 or 4 months it is kind of out of hand. I was not getting any help until I went to the doctor (again) and this time asked for a sleep apnoea test. The preliminary test showed that I definitely had it and quite extreme results, so now I have been referred to a sleep clinic. I am going privately as I want to get this sorted though I have a medical card.

    My question is, does sleep apnoea develop - get worse? I know I am reporting a situation where it has got worse over the years, but now over the last couple of weeks it seems to be speeding up and I seem to be more and more tired each day, to the extent that I am now finding it difficult to be rational, it is affecting my judgment and I just sit in a chair most of each day feeling exhausted. I am really barely functioning. I have asked for a cancellation appointment if one comes up but I can hardly think straight. I can hardly cope with the idea of waiting two or three weeks. Has anyone else felt like this?

    I am not overweight, do not smoke, drink very little, do not have breathing difficulties and have propped up my mattress so I am raised up, and I sleep on my side. I have also tried the nasal strips which sometimes help but mostly don't. I have had arrhythmia for years, which I understand can be linked to sleep apnoea, and I have also been diagnosed with serious depression, though I am beginning to think I might not be depressed at all, just tired.

    I am worried about the way it seems to be getting worse though, and I wonder if anyone else has had this?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,777 ✭✭✭dmcg90


    My doctor has diagnosed me with sleep apnea and has recommended I get health insurance and get to a sleep clinic.

    What insurance should I go with to do this?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,294 ✭✭✭daithi7


    Here's some great tips to help you get some sleep ......

    http://www.well.com/~mick/insomnia/

    and here they are put to music by a choir in New York, I kid you not :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=tznqYLK_c0I

    tips summary from well.com/~mick/insomnia

    Index of Insomnia Tips

    See a Doctor
    Take a Warm Bath
    Get a Massage
    Listen to Music or Other Audio
    Drink Warm Milk
    Drink Herb Tea
    Eat a Bedtime Snack
    Avoid Caffeine, Alcohol and Tobacco
    Sleep in a Well-Ventilated Room
    Sleep on a Good Firm Bed
    Sleep on Your Back
    Get Some Physical Exercise During the Day
    Keep Regular Bedtime Hours
    If You Can't Sleep, Get Up
    Don't Sleep In
    Get Up Earlier in the Morning
    Keep Your Bed a Place for Sleep
    Avoid Naps
    Avoid Illuminated Bedroom Clocks



    Of course there's the standard insomnia remedy
    that everyone knows (although it never worked for us, so we've got a better version)

    Counting Sheep
    Some insomnia cures you probably
    haven't seen before

    Sleep With Your Head Facing North
    Don't Watch TV or Read Before Going to Bed
    Toe Wiggling
    Stomach Rub
    Progressive Relaxation
    [Listen to, or download at no charge, this guided relaxation]
    Deep Breathing
    Visualize Something Peaceful
    Visualize Something Boring
    Imagine It's Time to Get Up
    Quiet Ears
    And some new suggestions from readers
    who have found these remedies useful for their own insomnia.

    Not Thinking
    Smoke Yourself to Sleep
    Yawning
    Sex—Alone or with Others
    Backwards Counting / Mental Computer
    South, Not North
    Earplugs
    Secure Place
    Bedtime Routine
    Hot Water Bottle
    Green Cows—and Other Animals of Color
    Short Walk Before Bed

    Testimonials


    Good luck! Have a pleasant sleep!


  • Registered Users Posts: 71 ✭✭VicWynne


    Do you have to go through your GP for a referral to a sleep clinic, or can you contact them yourself?
    Thanks,


  • Registered Users Posts: 95 ✭✭Kevin the Kid


    stbalaji2u wrote: »
    good.. you have provided good information over here. But actually i am from india. So do any of you guys have idea about where can i catch a sleep clinic in india. I need to find soon, I am suffering a lot.

    Just a question. You are not taking malaria prevention tablets are you? They are very disruptive to sleep patterns and have serious side effects like sleepwalking etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7 tal123


    Hi everyone! So sorry to bump this thread...I don't have sleep apnea, I just have incredibly bad and currently nightly sleep terrors and sleepwalking. It's happened off and on for over 15 years now and I keep waiting for it to just go away but it's sticking around fairly stubbornly and I'm tired of being scared all night and exhausted all day. Does anyone know how much I should expect to pay in the Mater (no medical card, no insurance)? Happy to go anywhere else as well, I just have only been able to find information about their clinic when researching online. And if anyone else is experiencing similar things and/or has successfully treated it, I'd really appreciate any insight/advice. Thanks a mill!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2 skinny79


    Alfasud wrote: »
    Does anybody have a problem whereby they think they are awake but are told they have been snoring?
    My Girlfriend is constantly nagging me about this, i get really frustrated with her and end up arguing about it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 356 ✭✭MarcinG


    Alfasud wrote: »
    Does anybody have a problem whereby they think they are awake but are told they have been snoring?

    yes. Ps i have something wrong with my septum. i have no problem snoring while breathing through nose


  • Registered Users Posts: 556 ✭✭✭dslamjack


    I have been referred for test's for possible sleep apnoea,although I do not get tired or sleepy during the day.
    How ever my GP has now informed me that due to new regulation's that have been introduced that I may have to stop driving privately and for work till a diagnosis is obtained from a specialist.
    She has said she will let me know during the week if I can continue to drive,even though at this stage that sleep apnoea is supposition and has not yet been diagnosed.
    But she say's that because I have been referred for a possible sleep disorder her hand's have been tied.
    I find this hard to take in,I could understand if a person was dropping out of their standing and falling asleep without warning or so tired as too make them incapable of driving(being the equivalent of been drunk with tiredness,instead of alcohol).
    Let's face it ,if a person was that tired it would be criminal to get in to a vehicle and drive.
    I was wondering has anybody here been put in a similar position by their doctor.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2 FRUB


    HELLO EVERYONE, THIS IS MY FIRST POST...

    I decided to loin you as I have just read what NONAMETODAY has written on sleep apnea, and agree totally with that experience, I am 60 years old and have had this condition all my life, it was only till I was 51 years old that I actually found out about sleep apnea, and had a sleep study done, it told me that I stopped breathing 41 times an hour? yet there was very little the medical people could do except offer me a CPAP machine at that time these machine where not very good and was told because of the way I slept that the mask would only keep falling off, so I did nothing more about it, until November last year when I got a referral to Merlin Park in Galway, and yesterday 5/4/2017 I attended an appointment , the result of this appointment was that I would now have to have the CPAP machine to which I am now awaiting...

    What NONAMETODAY has stated they had gone through I can relate to very well, and so I had to write my piece on this subject so thank you NONAMETODAY for encouraging me to do so, i have managed to live through the best part of life not knowing about my condition, and am still here but their comes a time when you have to stop and re-think what having sleep apnea is really doing to you health wise, so if you have this condition please (if you have not already) see you GP, and get a CPAP machine organised, they have machines now that will help a lot despite all the controversy about said machines, I have been lucky so far and had no heart problems, even so have stopped smoking, and taken on more exercise by walking and a little cycling, weight issues have been my problem and although I eat in a healthy manner the benefits of these small changes are vast, so do not be afraid of change in your life, just go for it, at the end of the day you have to care more about yourself when you have apnea.

    One final thing here, I would like to know if anyone can tell me where I can chat to or even meet people with this condition, as the sleep apnea society here in Ireland is very badly run, by this I mean you contact them and you get no reply's, the information on there site is helpful but only copied from other sources, anyway any one out there who can help me contact others with sleep apnea plaese let me know. thank you.


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    MOD: Unsticky to see if posts increase.


  • Registered Users Posts: 309 ✭✭Troy McClure


    Got referred by my GP to see a doctor working out of, or near the Mater Private. Got a letter saying I would have to wait 4 months and pay a whopping €350 just for the first consultation alone!! No tests nothing included. They are extra! My health insurer said they could contribute €75 towards this, but nothing towards any tests.
    She's keeping people awake with those prices. Her office person tried to suggest she's one of the more reasonably priced doing it.
    I might not be able to sleep, but how do they sleep at night !!

    Can anyone recommend someone to see about sleep. Would love to see someone about this issue. Can travel is necessary.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 9,097 CMod ✭✭✭✭Fathom


    Wish I could help. Not in Ireland. Anyone else?


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Politics Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 81,310 CMod ✭✭✭✭coffee_cake


    Got referred by my GP to see a doctor working out of, or near the Mater Private. Got a letter saying I would have to wait 4 months and pay a whopping €350 just for the first consultation alone!! No tests nothing included. They are extra! My health insurer said they could contribute €75 towards this, but nothing towards any tests.
    She's keeping people awake with those prices. Her office person tried to suggest she's one of the more reasonably priced doing it.
    I might not be able to sleep, but how do they sleep at night !!

    Can anyone recommend someone to see about sleep. Would love to see someone about this issue. Can travel is necessary.

    To be honest i paid her out of pocket and paid the mater private also. it racked up but i think it was more than worth it in the end for the benefit i have got out of it. she's absolutely brilliant and i was very impressed with her and her thorough approach.
    if you do go with her she can do an at-home test which is significantly cheaper than the mater in-house one, IF you meet the criteria. she gave me the option when i mentioned that my insurance were having none of it, though i didn't take it in the end as it's less reliable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 309 ✭✭Troy McClure


    My GP couldn't believe these rates so she is trying to sort something else out.

    I was in this same clinic presenting with the same problem 12 years ago and for €200 I was given a photocopy of a photocopy about sleep hygiene. Stuff I was already doing.! It wasn't with this person I don't think as the name is not familiar. Same practice.

    It may be worth it for some if you can find the money it irrelevant. If you can't then I guess it's tough! I can't see the point trying to get that amount of money, but then not been able to afford to do any tests.

    Their letter actually had some rant about people constantly not showing up, and that others had to wait longer as a consequence. Does it occur to them it's easy to make an appointment and not so easy to get that kind of money to pay for it.
    It seems they are charging these rates to subsidise the amount of people who don't show up!
    My GP described €350 as extortionate and I agree.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 9,097 CMod ✭✭✭✭Fathom


    My GP couldn't believe these rates so she is trying to sort something else out.
    Good luck.


  • Registered Users Posts: 196 ✭✭davork


    I was diagnosed in the US back in 2002 - that woman I married didnt like my breathing stopping (hmmm!) - the surgeon wanted to do a UVPP and break my noise ('deviated septum') but the insurer was having none of it ('its cosmetic darling so you dont need it'). So off I went to become a hoser!

    Back here since (mostly) 2005 and the GP referred me to a consulant near the Mater...

    Said dr (who has retired I wont name her, but shes still listed as active on the various websites <facepalm>) - got a letter out of the blue saying she was retiring last year and no response from the assistant answering the phone at the practise she ran with another dr when I chase up for someone to take over... so back to getting another reference and... as this is ireland... yet another three month queue...

    As for insurance? Waste of time - its a pre-existing and the insurers couldnt give a **** - so I got my prescrtiptions and collected when I was on one of the regular trips to the US - the machines cost less than 12 months on the (IE) co-pay and luckily I can pay that out

    So any consultant recommendations I can 'suggest' to the GP are welcome! preferable north side!


  • Registered Users Posts: 514 ✭✭✭Yenwod


    bluewolf wrote: »
    To be honest i paid her out of pocket and paid the mater private also. it racked up but i think it was more than worth it in the end for the benefit i have got out of it. she's absolutely brilliant and i was very impressed with her and her thorough approach.
    if you do go with her she can do an at-home test which is significantly cheaper than the mater in-house one, IF you meet the criteria. she gave me the option when i mentioned that my insurance were having none of it, though i didn't take it in the end as it's less reliable.

    Would you be able to give me a ballpark figure on how much the sleep study cost in the Mater Private? I have been referred there but my insurance will only cover 35% of it and I suspect I will not be able to afford the other 65%. I don't want to bother getting an appointment with the consultant and pay their fee is there is no way I can afford the test


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Politics Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 81,310 CMod ✭✭✭✭coffee_cake


    Yenwod wrote: »
    Would you be able to give me a ballpark figure on how much the sleep study cost in the Mater Private? I have been referred there but my insurance will only cover 35% of it and I suspect I will not be able to afford the other 65%. I don't want to bother getting an appointment with the consultant and pay their fee is there is no way I can afford the test

    two overnights about 850 each, two consultant visits in-hospital the following mornings, 250 and i think one was reduced to 150.
    two other consultant appointments including the initial one, 250 each.
    i have a tally done up somewhere, but it ended up about 3k


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  • Registered Users Posts: 514 ✭✭✭Yenwod


    bluewolf wrote: »
    two overnights about 850 each, two consultant visits in-hospital the following mornings, 250 and i think one was reduced to 150.
    two other consultant appointments including the initial one, 250 each.
    i have a tally done up somewhere, but it ended up about 3k
    Thanks, appreciate the reply. That’s quite a bit of money. I had a sleep study years ago in the Bons which was fully covered by my insurance but nothing came out of it. Still have issues & according to the doctor, the Mater is a better for sleep clinic. Will have to give it some thought & major saving. Thanks again


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