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02-05-2021, 12:38   #31
Oneiric 3
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Just as an example above, I remember that this feature last May (around the 22nd) was described as 'unseasonable' at the time.

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02-05-2021, 15:06   #32
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Cuckoo storm, also known locally as the storm to bring in the May heads. The long rods with seaweed connected to it. you see washed up on the beach. Used to be collected for iodine as well as other things.
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02-05-2021, 16:41   #33
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Cuckoo storm, also known locally as the storm to bring in the May heads. The long rods with seaweed connected to it. you see washed up on the beach. Used to be collected for iodine as well as other things.
Very interesting

Have a distant memory of that, looked it up and found this on Duchas


This is a collection of folklore compiled by schoolchildren in Ireland in the 1930s




And below an interesting link with the Cuckoo to Scaraveen from the Irish Independent

https://www.independent.ie/opinion/l...-31109871.html

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March 31 2015 11:15 PM

Strolling out from Mass on Saturday evening, a friendly neighbour - aware that I am a year-round sea swimmer - jocosely advised me to stay out of the sea until "Scaraveen" has passed. Her reference to "Scaraveen" reminded me of a gifted teacher who taught me Irish, history and geography in Tralee CBS.

I always enjoyed this particular teacher's classes, as he had a wonderful way of blending his extensive general knowledge seamlessly into his teaching. When it came to Irish culture, folklore, history and sport he was without equal. So, while I have heard and read many definitions of "Scaraveen," I have never deviated from my former teacher's description.

According to him, "Scaraveen" is an anglicising of the Irish phrase "garbh shion na gcuach", which means "the rough weather of the cuckoo". The Irish term gradually became "garbh shion", then "Garaveen" and, finally, "Scaraveen."

The cuckoo winters in sub-Saharan Africa and returns to Europe in early spring. She is a solitary bird, more often heard than seen. The familiar "cuck-oo cuck-oo" call heralds the beginning of spring, when the cuckoo returns to our shores.

The cuckoo, one of the most infamous brood parasites, lays her eggs in the nests of small song birds with precision timing. Once hatched, the cuckoo chicks eject the legitimate occupants and are then fed by the unsuspecting foster parents. The cuckoo chick is already a true master of deception.

Folklore has it that "Scaraveen" is nature's way of exacting retribution on the cuckoo for the havoc she causes in the bird world. From about April 15 to May 15, mild spring weather has been known to revert to cold, wet miserable weather, which is more typical of winter. Unfortunately, we all pay the price for the cuckoo's misdeeds.

I'm sure Evelyn Cusack and the Met Éireann team can come up with a scientific explanation for the phenomenon of "Scaraveen" and, indeed, the much maligned cuckoo may be an entirely innocent party. But, until they do, I'll stick with my former teacher's definition.

Billy Ryle

Tralee, Co Kerry
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02-05-2021, 16:56   #34
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Latest output from ECM and ICON would suggest the warning level might need to be increased to gusts up to 110 km/h . ICON is a bit out on its own with the highest wind gusts, even higher then the EURO 4. ARPEGE just rolling out and much the same as previous run showing a lot of rain overnight in the W.
















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02-05-2021, 18:29   #35
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Heavy rain has arrived in Sligo. It's been raining past 2 hours 4mm so far
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02-05-2021, 18:39   #36
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Cuckoo storms - fascinating !
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02-05-2021, 22:18   #37
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Aunt rang the auld lady there asking had we battened down the hatches. Apparently one of her neighbour's said theres a big storm on the way and is gona hit Galway at midnight!
I went straight on to Met Eireann and saw only the yellow warning that was issued earlier. Where the hell are sum people getting their news?!
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02-05-2021, 22:51   #38
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Believe Met Eireann, others tend to exaggerate.
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02-05-2021, 23:01   #39
Oscar Bravo
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Aunt rang the auld lady there asking had we battened down the hatches. Apparently one of her neighbour's said theres a big storm on the way and is gona hit Galway at midnight!
I went straight on to Met Eireann and saw only the yellow warning that was issued earlier. Where the hell are sum people getting their news?!
Poor oul Michael Fish got caught out the same way years back
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02-05-2021, 23:38   #40
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I am actually looking forward to a day inside watching the rain and the TV.
All that good weather has me worn out and I am sick of gardening!
The farmers need some rain too.
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02-05-2021, 23:40   #41
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Looking at the charts the wind seems more a problem than the rain. Following the dry March-April the ground should soak up much of the rain.
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03-05-2021, 00:00   #42
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Jez don't know who read the forecast just now on radio but he was all over the place
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03-05-2021, 00:01   #43
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South Galway and there isn’t even a leaf blowing on the trees. Eerily calm, not a drop of rain either.
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03-05-2021, 02:19   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meteorite58 View Post
Very interesting

Have a distant memory of that, looked it up and found this on Duchas


This is a collection of folklore compiled by schoolchildren in Ireland in the 1930s




And below an interesting link with the Cuckoo to Scaraveen from the Irish Independent

https://www.independent.ie/opinion/l...-31109871.html

Letters
Letters to the Editor

March 31 2015 11:15 PM

Strolling out from Mass on Saturday evening, a friendly neighbour - aware that I am a year-round sea swimmer - jocosely advised me to stay out of the sea until "Scaraveen" has passed. Her reference to "Scaraveen" reminded me of a gifted teacher who taught me Irish, history and geography in Tralee CBS.

I always enjoyed this particular teacher's classes, as he had a wonderful way of blending his extensive general knowledge seamlessly into his teaching. When it came to Irish culture, folklore, history and sport he was without equal. So, while I have heard and read many definitions of "Scaraveen," I have never deviated from my former teacher's description.

According to him, "Scaraveen" is an anglicising of the Irish phrase "garbh shion na gcuach", which means "the rough weather of the cuckoo". The Irish term gradually became "garbh shion", then "Garaveen" and, finally, "Scaraveen."

The cuckoo winters in sub-Saharan Africa and returns to Europe in early spring. She is a solitary bird, more often heard than seen. The familiar "cuck-oo cuck-oo" call heralds the beginning of spring, when the cuckoo returns to our shores.

The cuckoo, one of the most infamous brood parasites, lays her eggs in the nests of small song birds with precision timing. Once hatched, the cuckoo chicks eject the legitimate occupants and are then fed by the unsuspecting foster parents. The cuckoo chick is already a true master of deception.

Folklore has it that "Scaraveen" is nature's way of exacting retribution on the cuckoo for the havoc she causes in the bird world. From about April 15 to May 15, mild spring weather has been known to revert to cold, wet miserable weather, which is more typical of winter. Unfortunately, we all pay the price for the cuckoo's misdeeds.

I'm sure Evelyn Cusack and the Met Éireann team can come up with a scientific explanation for the phenomenon of "Scaraveen" and, indeed, the much maligned cuckoo may be an entirely innocent party. But, until they do, I'll stick with my former teacher's definition.

Billy Ryle

Tralee, Co Kerry
Loved this. Thank you.
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03-05-2021, 06:35   #45
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Not a breeze overnight in Limerick
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