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21-06-2020, 18:28   #31
Mjolnir
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Originally Posted by karlitob View Post
Stop taking about what you don’t know. Chartered physiotherapists do not have ‘extremely limited’ hands on skills. That’s a ridiculous and stupid statement all in one. We practice evidence-based treatment. Not like the quacks who do a weekend course and all of a sudden guess what every patient gets for treatment on Monday morning.

Look back on what you said - ‘I cant hold a candle to physios’ on anatomy etc. You’ve just said that you have limited knowledge of anatomy and physiology yet for some reason can apply treatments based on anatomy and physiology to patients.
If you can’t diagnose a patient how can you treat them.
If you aren’t a ‘uni-based physio’ (in fact you’re not a physio at all as you’re not Coru registered) how do you know what the course syllabus.


What muscle ‘shock’ component? Cupping?
Instantly discredited himself, I genuinely wish this shock the muscle bs would die once and for all. It needs to be took out back and force fed a bullet. I'm all for bro science but jesus that one rots me. Want to shock it try teach it algebra.
You can't shock a muscle through exercise or stimulation , the only way you can shock a muscle is to give it a literal electrical shock.
Anyone can do a pt course op, I've a pt cert and the amount of people I know with one who have no understanding of the body or an individuals need is staggering. Excercise adaptation is the most important aspect of giving someone a resistance based programme.
Most physios I know of in private practice do cupping, needling, myofacial release work to get the everyday work in the door.
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21-06-2020, 18:36   #32
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I don't think you should do either as you are clearly not interested in the actual, you are just looking for a handy number. Do follow something that you are interested in, and it will be easier, and the hours won't matter.
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21-06-2020, 19:20   #33
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Originally Posted by karlitob View Post
Stop taking about what you don’t know. Chartered physiotherapists do not have ‘extremely limited’ hands on skills. That’s a ridiculous and stupid statement all in one. We practice evidence-based treatment. Not like the quacks who do a weekend course and all of a sudden guess what every patient gets for treatment on Monday morning.

Look back on what you said - ‘I cant hold a candle to physios’ on anatomy etc. You’ve just said that you have limited knowledge of anatomy and physiology yet for some reason can apply treatments based on anatomy and physiology to patients.
If you can’t diagnose a patient how can you treat them.
If you aren’t a ‘uni-based physio’ (in fact you’re not a physio at all as you’re not Coru registered) how do you know what the course syllabus.


What muscle ‘shock’ component? Cupping?
So, I'm to assume you're a registered physio under Coru?

You qualified in what year?

Let's just skip over the cert vs degree physical therapist debate for a moment....

Your undergrad physio qualification, assuming it was completed in Ireland? (either TCD, RCSI, UL or UCD presumably).
Work load/intensity, how would you have rated it?

Of course every student is different but, would you say much like the description of pharmacy undergrad, 9 to 5 was for lectures and tutorials, evenings and weekends was for study?

I mean naturally there's some study during that time period but, I'm mean is it all consuming as the pharmacy undergrad has been described as being?

I stress again, extra-curricular time is simply something that I can't afford to compromise hugely - thus getting insights into just how intense these programs are is of course important.

So, the fact I advertise and practice as an MSK therapist despite no iscp membership or coru registration, I mean, it is what is; but overlooking that for the moment to focus answers specifically on what constitutes a physiotherapy undergrad....?

Cause getting perspective here is basically the objective.
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21-06-2020, 19:32   #34
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So, I'm to assume you're a registered physio under Coru?

You qualified in what year?

Let's just skip over the cert vs degree physical therapist debate for a moment....

Your undergrad physio qualification, assuming it was completed in Ireland? (either TCD, RCSI, UL or UCD presumably).
Work load/intensity, how would you have rated it?

Of course every student is different but, would you say much like the description of pharmacy undergrad, 9 to 5 was for lectures and tutorials, evenings and weekends was for study?

I mean naturally there's some study during that time period but, I'm mean is it all consuming as the pharmacy undergrad has been described as being?

I stress again, extra-curricular time is simply something that I can't afford to compromise hugely - thus getting insights into just how intense these programs are is of course important.

So, the fact I advertise and practice as an MSK therapist despite no iscp membership or coru registration, I mean, it is what is; but overlooking that for the moment to focus answers specifically on what constitutes a physiotherapy undergrad....?

Cause getting perspective here is basically the objective.
There’s no ‘cert v degree’ debate. There’s only registration with Coru.

It’s not very clear on what you’re looking for.

If you’re a thicko you’re not getting far in either course. If you want to do well, work harder. Less well, work less hard. If ‘extra/curricular’ is important to you, then college isn’t for you, regardless of course. Of course you have to work evenings and weekends. What planet are you on. If you think you can earn a professional undergraduate degree by only working 9-5 you’ve a rude awakening in store. If you think asking a physio what pharmacy is like; or a pharmacist what physio is like, then you’re definitely on the wrong track.

The course syllabus for both courses is on each of the colleges website.


I reckon the best thing for you to do is to work as an over the counter assistant in a pharmacy and at the weekend you can do a massage course then you can advertise yourself as a quack - I mean MSK therapist (though I often wondered how you can leave the nervous system out and only focus on muscles and bones. It’s almost like the move themselves. Or that the muscle and the bone feel pain independent of the body).
That way - you get the best of both worlds. And none of us need to count you as a peer.
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21-06-2020, 19:41   #35
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I don't think you should do either as you are clearly not interested in the actual, you are just looking for a handy number. Do follow something that you are interested in, and it will be easier, and the hours won't matter.
Well it's actually the opposite, I've an overwhelming interest in both, in particular cellular function as regard innervation and gene expression, which dictates MSK well being, long term neurological well being, is basically the entire focus of pharmacological drug therapeutics both historical and future based treatments - most specifically more contemporary intra-cellular effectors - and most importantly, I unquestionably believe that whilst medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical based therapeutics provide untold relief, long term cellular optimization will be found in a modality thus far not even explored.

Sorry for that mouthful but, what I wish to convey is that, the actual concepts underwriting both the basis for MSK physiotherapeutics and pharmaco based drug therapies - they fascinate me;

What academia delivers in terms of tuition however, it's established information.

You could say for intents and purposes that, I can't allow myself to be constrained by a learning regiment which is challenging, beneficial - but alas, taught to 100's of students every year with little in the way of establishing innovation - certainly not facilitated at an undergrad level at least.


I outline this because, I'm asking time from both physios and pharmacists browsing this forum to contribute insight as to attaining those base qualifications, the intensity, workload etc - so as I can basically get a better day job.

But a day job relevant to my interests, whilst not limiting my pursuit of innovation relative to those interests.

And I guess if contributors are going to make time to provide this valuable insight, it's important they understand it's not just to some dude that's looking for a, "handy number", but rather get a relevant day job that pays the bills like we all must, whilst not interfering with additional pursuits, understandings and acquisition of novel information that pertain directly to that very area.
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21-06-2020, 19:41   #36
The Hound Gone Wild
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None of the health sciences are easy degrees, all of them are intense. None of them lead to easy jobs.

All I can speak for is Pharmacy. For me it was 9-6 Monday-Friday and probably another 20 hours a week study time.

Is it possible to work 20 hours a week as a Pharmacist? Yes, you can get a contract for 20 hours somewhere, you can also locum and work when and where you want. The work is volatile, it's almost dead at the moment and hourly rates have crashed out. Working as a Pharmacist is not a handy life no matter how many hours you do weekly. It's extremely stressful, especially locum work & lunch breaks are non-existant.
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21-06-2020, 19:46   #37
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Originally Posted by LaptopGremlin View Post
Well it's actually the opposite, I've an overwhelming interest in both, in particular cellular function as regard innervation and gene expression, which dictates MSK well being, long term neurological well being, is basically the entire focus of pharmacological drug therapeutics both historical and future based treatments - most specifically more contemporary intra-cellular effectors - and most importantly, I unquestionably believe that whilst medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical based therapeutics provide untold relief, long term cellular optimization will be found in a modality thus far not even explored.

Sorry for that mouthful but, what I wish to convey is that, the actual concepts underwriting both the basis for MSK physiotherapeutics and pharmaco based drug therapies - they fascinate me;

What academia delivers in terms of tuition however, it's established information.

You could say for intents and purposes that, I can't allow myself to be constrained by a learning regiment which is challenging, beneficial - but alas, taught to 100's of students every year with little in the way of establishing innovation - certainly not facilitated at an undergrad level at least.


I outline this because, I'm asking time from both physios and pharmacists browsing this forum to contribute insight as to attaining those base qualifications, the intensity, workload etc - so as I can basically get a better day job.

But a day job relevant to my interests, whilst not limiting my pursuit of innovation relative to those interests.

And I guess if contributors are going to make time to provide this valuable insight, it's important they understand it's not just to some dude that's looking for a, "handy number", but rather get a relevant day job that pays the bills like we all must, whilst not interfering with additional pursuits, understandings and acquisition of novel information that pertain directly to that very area.
You’re a plank. I’d hate to work with you. And I’d never send a patient to you.

Not once in crappy posts (this thread or the other threads where you’re asking the same stupid questions) have you ever mentioned or asked about patients. Some people don’t really care, some people prefer the academia and put up with patients; but I’ll tell you this - underneath all of it (yes even underneath gene expression) it’s about helping people with the tools of your trade. All professions rely in some way on the other. You won’t make it very far - as you’re a plank.
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21-06-2020, 19:48   #38
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Lads,

Stop engaging with this troll, who managed to completely piss off pharmacists in his last thread and looks like doing the same to physics here.
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21-06-2020, 19:59   #39
LaptopGremlin
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You’re a plank. I’d hate to plank work with you. And I’d never send a plank patient to you.

Not once in plank crappy posts (this plank thread or the other plank threads where you’re plank asking the same stupid plank questions) have you ever mentioned or asked about plank patients. Some plank people don’t really plank care, some plank people prefer the plank academia and put up with plank patients; but I’ll plank tell you this - underneath all of it (yes even underneath plank gene expression) it’s about helping plank people with the tools of your plank trade. All plank professions rely in some way on the plank other. You won’t make it very plank far - as you’re a plank.
A "plank", hmm?



This hilarious thing here is, I'm genuinely trying to acquire information to make an informed choice on the optimal career path.

Wouldn't get far?

I left a lucrative career in a respected profession (which I already have an honours university degree in, without every once staying longer than 6 pm in the evening on the way to acquiring), specifically to pursue these interests, as I feel in many respects, they're the future.

So I'm just trying to get a little feel for the pharmacists working life (including degree acquisition), and the coru registered physios working life (including same).

And thus far several responses have been great - but this is my last opportunity to revisit uni so, given the time and financial involvement in such a huge life decision, it's gotta be a one informed from every perspective.
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21-06-2020, 20:05   #40
LaptopGremlin
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Originally Posted by The Hound Gone Wild View Post
None of the health sciences are easy degrees, all of them are intense. None of them lead to easy jobs.

All I can speak for is Pharmacy. For me it was 9-6 Monday-Friday and probably another 20 hours a week study time.

Is it possible to work 20 hours a week as a Pharmacist? Yes, you can get a contract for 20 hours somewhere, you can also locum and work when and where you want. The work is volatile, it's almost dead at the moment and hourly rates have crashed out. Working as a Pharmacist is not a handy life no matter how many hours you do weekly. It's extremely stressful, especially locum work & lunch breaks are non-existant.
Hey that's cool. Thank you, I appreciate the perspective.

In contrast, granted I'm a "quack" MSK therapist but, this current line of work isn't remotely stressful.
So I know you're not commenting on the physio working life but, from your post I'm strongly inferring that - "pharmacy, long or short hours - intense, stress etc".

Thus it would appear that perhaps physio will ultimately be a better fit for me....

At least that's what I'm inferring from your feedback.

I'm not gonna base my entire decision on it of course but, it's another viewpoint and that's what this thread is all about so thank you.
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21-06-2020, 20:11   #41
LaptopGremlin
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Originally Posted by karlitob View Post
You’re a plank. I’d hate to work with you. And I’d never send a patient to you.

Not once in crappy posts (this thread or the other threads where you’re asking the same stupid questions) have you ever mentioned or asked about patients. Some people don’t really care, some people prefer the academia and put up with patients; but I’ll tell you this - underneath all of it (yes even underneath gene expression) it’s about helping people with the tools of your trade. All professions rely in some way on the other. You won’t make it very far - as you’re a plank.
PS - what is this about "asking about patients"?

What exactly does that have to do with the price of cabbage?

I said in the other thread I acknowledge some may find it difficult.
I'm not among them.
For me it's easy.

What else is there to know?
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21-06-2020, 20:17   #42
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Originally Posted by LaptopGremlin View Post
Well it's actually the opposite, I've an overwhelming interest in both, in particular cellular function as regard innervation and gene expression, which dictates MSK well being, long term neurological well being, is basically the entire focus of pharmacological drug therapeutics both historical and future based treatments - most specifically more contemporary intra-cellular effectors - and most importantly, I unquestionably believe that whilst medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical based therapeutics provide untold relief, long term cellular optimization will be found in a modality thus far not even explored.

Sorry for that mouthful but, what I wish to convey is that, the actual concepts underwriting both the basis for MSK physiotherapeutics and pharmaco based drug therapies - they fascinate me;

What academia delivers in terms of tuition however, it's established information.

You could say for intents and purposes that, I can't allow myself to be constrained by a learning regiment which is challenging, beneficial - but alas, taught to 100's of students every year with little in the way of establishing innovation - certainly not facilitated at an undergrad level at least.


I outline this because, I'm asking time from both physios and pharmacists browsing this forum to contribute insight as to attaining those base qualifications, the intensity, workload etc - so as I can basically get a better day job.

But a day job relevant to my interests, whilst not limiting my pursuit of innovation relative to those interests.

And I guess if contributors are going to make time to provide this valuable insight, it's important they understand it's not just to some dude that's looking for a, "handy number", but rather get a relevant day job that pays the bills like we all must, whilst not interfering with additional pursuits, understandings and acquisition of novel information that pertain directly to that very area.
Where are you looking at doing physio? For the 4 yr course it’s fairly full time for the first two years. Third and fourth year would have a bit more self directed time and research project etc, so still a lot of hours, just not necessarily in college.
Clinical placement is 30 ish weeks, full time work, no pay, and lots of study at weekends and evening times.

Physio degree courses are based almost entirely on evidence based practice. A lot of what you’ve said you do at the moment Is out of date and not evidence based, so it might be worth reading up a bit to update your knowledge of what’s involved.
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21-06-2020, 20:35   #43
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Where are you looking at doing physio? For the 4 yr course it’s fairly full time for the first two years. Third and fourth year would have a bit more self directed time and research project etc, so still a lot of hours, just not necessarily in college.
Clinical placement is 30 ish weeks, full time work, no pay, and lots of study at weekends and evening times.

Physio degree courses are based almost entirely on evidence based practice. A lot of what you’ve said you do at the moment Is out of date and not evidence based, so it might be worth reading up a bit to update your knowledge of what’s involved.
RCSI or Trinity.

It's been outlined I'd be entering in 2nd year as a graduate applicant.

https://www.physio-pedia.com/Evidenc..._Physiotherapy

"The most common management of back pain and sciatica is to prescribe analgesics and advise rest and to treat acute attacks with bed rest"

Yeah I guess, I do march to the beat of my own drum in many respects, cause so much about contemporary treatment to me is questionable - but that's a conversation for another day.

I did try and download the physio timetable from the UCD website,

https://www.ucd.ie/students/generalr...timetable.html



That's all the modules



I think this is, 3rd year?
4th year?

It's hard to tell or gauge intensity - seems chill enough I guess?

Last edited by LaptopGremlin; 21-06-2020 at 20:39.
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21-06-2020, 20:38   #44
LaptopGremlin
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Versus pharmacy 3rd year RCSI,



https://www.rcsi.com/dublin/undergra...course-details

Is it just me or does that seem a little more full on?
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21-06-2020, 21:39   #45
jlm29
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Looks like a first year timetable to me, from what i can make out.
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