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18-04-2019, 18:53   #331
Csalem
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It is 1996 - the buses are green and there are no trams on Abbey Street. RH 124 is seen parked on Abbey Street between duties on the 37. Prior to the coming of the Luas, Abbey Street was one of the great bus terminii in the city. Buses could be seen parked facing west from the junction of Beresford Place to the junction of Liffey Street, with other buses parked off Strand Street. The northern side of Lower Abbey Street was also used by buses heading east and north-east. With the arrival of the Luas tram line in the early 2000s, buses were removed completely from the southside of Abbey Street. The 37 was relocated to Hawkins Street before moving to its current terminus on Wilton Terrace. The 37 in 2019 runs to Blanchardstown Shopping Centre but back in 1996 it only went as far as Castleknock.
RH 124 was delivered new to Dublin Bus in 1991 and survived in service until August 2005 (which is after the Luas tram system started). Initially sold to Ensign Bus in the UK it was sold the following year to Yahoo.
In the background is the bank operated by TSB. In a sign of where we have come in the last twenty-years, this will reopen in May 2019 as a Wetherspoons. 18/04/1996

Throwback Thursday (171) by Cathal O'Brien, on Flickr
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25-04-2019, 20:40   #332
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It is 1995 and D 722 is seen on O'Connell Street with a 16 to Santry. This is one of the older bus routes in Dublin, that can trace its route back to old tram network. Being a cross-city route it has connected Santry/Beaumont on the northside with Terenure/Rathfarnham on the southside. Various extensions over the years have included Nutgrove and Omni Park. In more recent times it has been routed to run from Dublin Airport to Ballinteer.
D 722 was delivered new to Cork in 1975 and transferred to Dublin Bus in 1988. It was withdrawn in late 1999, ending its days in the city tour fleet.
In the background is the head office of Dublin Bus. 27/04/1995

Throwback Thursday (172) by Cathal O'Brien, on Flickr
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02-05-2019, 21:26   #333
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It is May 2000 and the Bombardiers are counting down their final months with Dublin Bus. The first AVs went into service in September 2000 (these being the first low-floor double-deckers bought by Dublin Bus) and the final KD ran in December 2000. KD 332 is seen here on Eden Quay with a working on the 56A. It entered service in Dublin in 1983 so had a career of 17 years. Whereas some of the KDs that made it to 2000 got updated blinds with yellow letters/numbers, KD 332 managed to retain white ones to the end.
The 56A connects Dublin city centre with Tallaght, like a number of bus route, but perhaps not in the most direct way. This is reflected in its history of slowly moving its terminus further west over the years. Initially it went to Ballymount when it started in the early 1980s, then Fettercairn and eventually The Square. For a time there was a 56 too, the most recent incarnation linking Dolphin's Barn and The Square. This route was abolished during Network Direct in 2011. Over the years the 56A frequency has also been cut as it parallels the Luas Red Line for a lot of its route. Its most recent claim to fame is that it passes the garage of Go-Ahead Ireland in Ballymount. Eden Quay 03/05/2000

Throwback Thursday (173) by Cathal O'Brien, on Flickr
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09-05-2019, 11:44   #334
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It is 1998 and a low-emissions trial is taking place with Dublin Bus. The previous year saw five low-floor single-deckers delivered to Dublin Bus. These in themselves were a novelty as they represented some of the first wheel-chair accessible buses in the fleet. The W-Class minibuses were another example. VL 1-5 were operated out of Donnybrook Garage and were mostly confined to routes 1,2 and 3. Passengers could identify which services they were on by the departure times in the timetable being written in red.
VL 6 arrived in 1998, and unlike the other 5, used natural gas as a power source. The trial was run in conjunction with Bord Gáis and the bus was used in service on routes 1,2 and 3. Whereas the other VLs survived with Dublin Bus until 2009, this one left the fleet in 2000. 19 years later, in early-2019, a number of buses have been on trial in Dublin and Cork to test alternative fuels to diesel that could reduce emissions. At least one of these trial buses involved natural gas.
Route 2 was a shortened version of route 3, providing extra capacity on the southside and only going as far as Parnell Square on the northside. It was merged into the new route 1 under Network Direct in 2012. O'Connell Street, 09/05/1998

Throwback Thursday (174) by Cathal O'Brien, on Flickr
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15-05-2019, 13:01   #335
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Am going a day early this week due to scheduling conflicts.

It is 1986 and D 653 is seen on one of the shorter bus routes in Dublin. Route 53 connects Dublin Port with the City Centre via the residential area of East Wall. In the past it was a busier route, used by the dock workers in Dublin Port. There was a 53A too which took a more direct route and avoided East Wall. Over time the routes became less popular. Part of this decline can be attributed to the frequent route 151 (started in 2007) which has a terminus on East Road and the Luas tram line to the Point Depot (started in 2009). Under Network Direct the 53A was abolished and the 53 was extended to the Irish Ferries terminal. For a while Dublin Bus also ran a 53B from Heuston Station to this ferry terminal but this was a commercial contract which terminated in 2017.
D 653 was delivered new to Dublin in 1975 and withdrawn in 1994. It is seen on East Road as it climbs over one of the railway yards for the port. In 2019 this is the only remaining yard operated by Irish Rail in the port, the rest having been sold for development. 13/05/1986

Throwback Thursday (175) by Cathal O'Brien, on Flickr

Last edited by Csalem; 15-05-2019 at 13:16.
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24-05-2019, 17:33   #336
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Flickr was down yesterday so a day late.

May 1993 and RH 4 is seen on Abbey Street at a time of great change. 1993 was when Dublin Bus started CitySwift services. The idea was the run single-deck buses at higher frequencies, basically offering a turn-up and go service. The first route to be converted was the 39 which was to run between Abbey Street and Clonsilla via Blanchardstown. However it was not smooth transition to CitySwift. Immediately prior to its introduction there was a week-long strike which started on the 23rd May. Therefore this day, the 22nd May, was probably the last day of double-decker operations on the 39...for about two years. CitySwift was so successful that the single-decker buses could not cope and double-deckers had to be brought in.
RH 4 was delivered new to Dublin Bus in 1990. It was one of eighteen Leyland Olympians buses initially ordered by Dublin Bus, but eventually there were 640 Olympians. It was withdrawn in 1999 and may subsequently have gone to Croatia.
The bus is in an all-over ad for Irish Kidney Association, advertising organ donor cards. Abbey Street, 22/05/1993

Throwback Thursday (176) by Cathal O'Brien, on Flickr
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