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19-02-2018, 16:11   #1
eeinke
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How old is too old to return to study GAMSAT and Grad Med ?

Wondering whether my dream of becoming a doctor is for another life. Having family commitments and a mortgage have prevented me from even going there, but this dream doesnt go away.
Are there other courses that would allow me to fulfil a dream of working in a caring environment that maybe do not take up so much time and effort esp with a young family?
Again, what would be the age cut off to go back and study medicine? And whats the quickest way - Grad Med?
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19-02-2018, 19:18   #2
julie101
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What is your background - do you have a 2:1 in a honours degree? What do you think you would like about being a doctor and what type would you like to be? The more information we have the better the advice will be. Also how is your financial situation? The will only give loan for fees now at best.
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19-02-2018, 22:26   #3
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It’s a personal decision, and I think it depends on what you want to get out of medicine. If you started GEM at 40, you could be finished at 44, and a GP by 49/50 for example. You could then work 20 or so in a profession you’re happy with.

If you haven’t applied for the GAMSAT, then you won’t be able to apply for entry this year.
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21-02-2018, 10:38   #4
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I think 35 would be my cut off. Going to be very hard to do 24 or 36 hour shifts, not to mind working 80-100 hours a week when you're in your 40s with a young family
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24-02-2018, 10:47   #5
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This is an entirely personal question taking into account your own personal circumstances, drive and commitment. Of course you can take things like stamina into account for long shifts but these aren't as long as they used to be / can be minimised on certain rotations / only have to be for 3 years if you go for GP.

There are plenty of other jobs even within the healthcare which might fulfil you desire for a caring profession. The major difference between many of these roles and being a doctor is much larger focus on problem solving and ultimate decision-making and responsibility for patients.
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03-03-2018, 12:51   #6
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Hi there, I’m a GEM student and while I’m ‘average’ age, there are plenty of older students that I’ve been in classes/on placements with.

The oldest student in our year is mid forties. A few others are early forties with kids and families. There’s an intern I’ve met that’s about 43 and has a family. Other students in their thirties have had babies during the course and took no time off at all. Others take a year out if they need it and it’s no problem. They’re all excellent students, and they have the work/family balance thing really figured out.

While difficult, it’s totally possible to do. Good luck with whatever you decide!
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20-03-2018, 22:46   #7
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Hi all,

Just wanted to jump on this thread rather than start a new one.

It's encouraging to hear there are some GEM students in their forties - I am still a relatively recent grad in my mid 20s but feel kind of silly considering GEM.

I have a good job in the finance sector that pays well and allows me a good work/life balance, however I don't find the work incredibly fulfilling and the prospect of a big salary or material gain as the measure of success doesn't really get me going I have found. I have been considering med in the back of my head for a long time now and as I am getting older (although mid 20s is still young!) I decided I would rather try than wonder 'what if?' years down the road. I have aired my thoughts with some close family members and friends and some of them think I would be mad to give up my current job but as said above it's just not what my idea of success is.

I've always enjoyed helping others and volunteering etc., and have always had an interest in science and the body.

Would anyone have any advice for how you knew GEM was 100% what you wanted to do? I feel I do strongly want to do it, but if I pursue it then I will realistically be 29/30 by the time I start working as a doctor and my 20s will be long behind me, and I would also hate to put all them years into it only to find I'm not good at it.

I've started studying to sit in September and still intend to go through with it but would be curious to hear your thoughts. What are some questions I should consider/you considered before deciding to pursue GEM?

Thanks
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23-03-2018, 14:33   #8
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If you want to do it then do it- I started GEMS last September aged 35 with a 2 year old and a 6 month old- I have no science background and I have no money- But I’m there and I love it-If you think you’ll regret not doing it then give it a go and sure if it doesn’t work out that’s fine too
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26-03-2018, 18:17   #9
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I would not recommend medicine to anyone over the age of 30, even less so if you already have a decent career and decent wage. Intern starting salary is something like 34 k.

You can make more money but you will seriously work for it. You won't be long getting sick of 100 hour weeks, 24 + hour shifts, these things are even harder as you get older.

A colleague of mine did grad Med, in his late forties now, has a wife and kids and is literally living hand to mouth each week due to the burden of debt on him of circa >100k. Not to mention he hasn't even started paying off the principle.

Gp was an option back in the day but is now a minefield, you only need to have a quick look on twitter to see the impending gp crisis that is coming.

If you insist on doing this be prepared you will have to emigrate to make money and get trained properly. The training in this country is appalling. It's essentially third world training.
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27-03-2018, 19:48   #10
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Well aren't you a rainbow Brendan. Let me firstly say that you are wrong and I know this because one is always wrong when comparing the individual to the collective. You used relatively punchy paragraphs to be negative so in the interest of fluidity I'll address them succinctly. The money one - money goes up - not everyone is in this for money. The hours etc - you enjoy recounting media headlines when typing. Your friend with the debt one - People do have debt and some people have a lot of debt therefore point taken with regards to your friend, but refer back to the second line please. The GP one - There will be increased opportunity for GPs in the coming years. There are others types of doctors too. And finally the third world training one - Nope Training here is good.

Look if you want to do medicine (regardless of age) then do it. It's really interesting and enjoyable from an educational perspective. If you do it and don't like it, or it doesn't suit you then just do something else. No drama, at least you tried.
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27-03-2018, 21:21   #11
brendanwalsh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by che oh View Post
Well aren't you a rainbow Brendan. Let me firstly say that you are wrong and I know this because one is always wrong when comparing the individual to the collective. You used relatively punchy paragraphs to be negative so in the interest of fluidity I'll address them succinctly. The money one - money goes up - not everyone is in this for money. The hours etc - you enjoy recounting media headlines when typing. Your friend with the debt one - People do have debt and some people have a lot of debt therefore point taken with regards to your friend, but refer back to the second line please. The GP one - There will be increased opportunity for GPs in the coming years. There are others types of doctors too. And finally the third world training one - Nope Training here is good.

Look if you want to do medicine (regardless of age) then do it. It's really interesting and enjoyable from an educational perspective. If you do it and don't like it, or it doesn't suit you then just do something else. No drama, at least you tried.
Spoken like a true first year medical student! Glad you still have some ideals left. Wait till the bank of ireland have a boot on your neck 364 days of the year to get their thirty pieces.

I'd keep your opinions on training to yourself until you have actually worked as a doctor. The amount of scut work is horrendous, and the dedicated teaching minimal.

You'll find plenty doctors in this country doing Canulation, phlebotomy, catheterisation and even portering patients even at spr level.
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28-03-2018, 13:29   #12
Ariana Grande
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Quote:
Originally Posted by che oh View Post
Well aren't you a rainbow Brendan. Let me firstly say that you are wrong and I know this because one is always wrong when comparing the individual to the collective. You used relatively punchy paragraphs to be negative so in the interest of fluidity I'll address them succinctly. The money one - money goes up - not everyone is in this for money. The hours etc - you enjoy recounting media headlines when typing. Your friend with the debt one - People do have debt and some people have a lot of debt therefore point taken with regards to your friend, but refer back to the second line please. The GP one - There will be increased opportunity for GPs in the coming years. There are others types of doctors too. And finally the third world training one - Nope Training here is good.

Look if you want to do medicine (regardless of age) then do it. It's really interesting and enjoyable from an educational perspective. If you do it and don't like it, or it doesn't suit you then just do something else. No drama, at least you tried.
True. Everyone's background is different. Brendan seems to be only speaking on behalf of himself and his "friend" as if he was speaking for every person. It's also not the first time he's done this iirc.

Last edited by Ariana Grande; 28-03-2018 at 13:34.
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28-03-2018, 18:17   #13
che oh
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Indeed spoken like a first year medical student. A student who researched extensively from doctors at varying levels and varying fields before making a decision. I have close friends who recently went through intern, SHO, etc. I also know some GPs very well and spoke to them. Further to this I spoke to consultants in different fields. All of them spoke very highly of their jobs. Granted they did say this and that about things that aren't perfect, but nothing is really. They also spoke of hard work, dedication, and the emotional side of the job, but none of them regret becoming doctors (I asked them this specifically).

"You'll find plenty doctors in this country doing Canulation, phlebotomy, catheterisation and even portering patients even at spr level."

My god, the horror at having to porter a patient!!

Do you not think Brendan, that negativity outside the parameters of pragmatic discussion is a bad thing.

I was going to ask you if you were a doctor, but it doesn't really matter. This thread is about someone querying whether to do Grad med or not, and I genuinely don't think you are helpful.

Last edited by che oh; 28-03-2018 at 18:20.
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28-03-2018, 19:37   #14
brendanwalsh
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Indeed spoken like a first year medical student. A student who researched extensively from doctors at varying levels and varying fields before making a decision. I have close friends who recently went through intern, SHO, etc. I also know some GPs very well and spoke to them. Further to this I spoke to consultants in different fields. All of them spoke very highly of their jobs. Granted they did say this and that about things that aren't perfect, but nothing is really. They also spoke of hard work, dedication, and the emotional side of the job, but none of them regret becoming doctors (I asked them this specifically).

"You'll find plenty doctors in this country doing Canulation, phlebotomy, catheterisation and even portering patients even at spr level."

My god, the horror at having to porter a patient!!

Do you not think Brendan, that negativity outside the parameters of pragmatic discussion is a bad thing.

I was going to ask you if you were a doctor, but it doesn't really matter. This thread is about someone querying whether to do Grad med or not, and I genuinely don't think you are helpful.
If you think it's appropriate for trainee doctors to porter patients, then your probably the wrong person to have a discussion with about training in this country.

Keep singing from the hymn sheet in the front row of the church choir, the hse needs brain dead warm bodies to keep their slave trade alive.

Even if anyone on this thread disagrees with me, the gentleman asked if it's worth going back to be a doctor. He should be aware of the reality of it. Fair enough if most of you enjoy Catheterisation and Canulation, however in any other developed country this is not the job of awareness doctor. Doctors doing these tasks would be considered laughable in North America. In ireland you have to train to be a nurse and a doctor at the same time

Last edited by brendanwalsh; 28-03-2018 at 19:41.
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28-03-2018, 23:46   #15
Sgro
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Originally Posted by brendanwalsh View Post
I would not recommend medicine to anyone over the age of 30, even less so if you already have a decent career and decent wage. Intern starting salary is something like 34 k.

You can make more money but you will seriously work for it. You won't be long getting sick of 100 hour weeks, 24 + hour shifts, these things are even harder as you get older.

A colleague of mine did grad Med, in his late forties now, has a wife and kids and is literally living hand to mouth each week due to the burden of debt on him of circa >100k. Not to mention he hasn't even started paying off the principle.

Gp was an option back in the day but is now a minefield, you only need to have a quick look on twitter to see the impending gp crisis that is coming.

If you insist on doing this be prepared you will have to emigrate to make money and get trained properly. The training in this country is appalling. It's essentially third world training.

Interesting take. Are you a doctor yourself? Did you do grad med route?

>100k seems a lot of debt if studying in Ireland? Did your friend study abroad?

Where would you say has the best options for emigrating?
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