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17-07-2020, 00:22   #31
SeaBreezes
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Pic from cork
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17-07-2020, 00:35   #32
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Pic from cork
Great pic. Cloudless night here and can see the plough easily. Where do I look then to find the comet? Very bright star to left of the plough is presumably Venus?
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17-07-2020, 00:38   #33
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Nice clear evening in Dublin 15 but cant see jack. Is it quite close to the horizon? Looking NNW
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17-07-2020, 00:49   #34
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Nice clear evening in Dublin 15 but cant see jack. Is it quite close to the horizon? Looking NNW
Light pollution might be an issue
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17-07-2020, 00:54   #35
SeaBreezes
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Great pic. Cloudless night here and can see the plough easily. Where do I look then to find the comet? Very bright star to left of the plough is presumably Venus?
Below and to the right of the plough, its faint but visible to the naked eye, its the trail you will see first.
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17-07-2020, 01:01   #36
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https://skyandtelescope.org/astronom...se-and-lemmon/

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17-07-2020, 01:17   #37
little bess
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Yes, went to our local park In Dublin 5 and saw it before cloud cover came over here. Visible even with light pollution and without binoculars. The tail is very obvious, you won’t mistake it for a star!
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17-07-2020, 02:21   #38
M.T. Cranium
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Great pic. Cloudless night here and can see the plough easily. Where do I look then to find the comet? Very bright star to left of the plough is presumably Venus?
Assuming your question came shortly after your view of the sky, the bright star to the left was probably Arcturus. Jupiter would be high in the south at midnight with Saturn to its left, Venus rises around 0300h local time ahead of the Sun. Mars is also visible after 0130h and is midway between Venus and Jupiter-Saturn.
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17-07-2020, 02:22   #39
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Early risers (now to 0400h) can see Venus, Aldebaran and the crescent Moon in a tight conjunction rising in the east.
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17-07-2020, 12:00   #40
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A friend in the Netherlands showed me this picture that his friend took.
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17-07-2020, 12:04   #41
Gaoth Laidir
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A friend in the Netherlands showed me this picture that his friend took.
How come no stars are visible in that photo?
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17-07-2020, 15:03   #42
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Do we have to go to the Nederlands to see blue sky?

Actually if you set fire to any photo for a milisecond would you get the same effect
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17-07-2020, 15:06   #43
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How come no stars are visible in that photo?
Too bright for the stars to show up, and slightly cloudy over most of the image.
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18-07-2020, 06:50   #44
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Great capture in the UK:

https://twitter.com/ST0NEHENGE/statu...22083130888192
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18-07-2020, 07:12   #45
oriel36
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The distance from observer to horizon acts like a giant sun visor to events close to the inner solar system or where the Sun's glare swamps observation. Nowhere is this more apparent than the ISS where the horizon is the Earth itself -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yh1_wHdUx3Y&t=114s


In a mini version of this, the distance from observer to horizon as a twilight appearance shows objects close to the left of the Sun while a dawn appearance shows objects to the right of the Sun. This is why comet neowise is to the left of the Sun and will become a largely twilight appearance as viewed from the orbital plane of the Earth.

https://theskylive.com/planetarium?o...2747845|fov|80

There is nothing offensive in this description, however, those who choose to express the comet in terms of a plethora of objects rising and setting based on daily rotation fall far short of the relationship of the comet to the moving Earth and the stationary/central Sun. Far more enjoyable and challenging this way as it is much more than just identification. It is not for everyone but for those who can, there is a satisfaction involved like no other,at least in these matters.

Last edited by oriel36; 18-07-2020 at 07:23.
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