Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
22-07-2020, 23:23   #151
Popoutman
Troll Hunter.
 
Popoutman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 1,206

Here's a processed Neowise from last Saturday night, 24 ten-second exposures, Canon 6d, 50mm lens at f/2.5, ISO set at the standard highest dynamic range for a 6d of ISO1600. Unguided on a driven German equatorial mount.

Stacked in DeepSkyStacker and (attempted) gradient removal in PixInsight.

Not the most aesthetically pleasing, but a nice enough view of both tails, the gas/ion tail being ~20 degrees long up near M81/M82. I know I have banding issues with the processing, I'll figure that out again at some point. Consider it a work in progress..

I figured it would be about the only time I'd get to see it in Irish skies at this brightness, such a pretty sight.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Neowise.jpg (2.72 MB, 137 views)
Popoutman is offline  
Advertisement
23-07-2020, 01:02   #152
Gaoth Laidir
Registered User
 
Gaoth Laidir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 5,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by pistolpetes11 View Post
And you’re out of here ......
Buy that man a drink.

Oriel chose to pitch his tent in this forum of late since he was run out of the Astronomy one after being shown to know very little of what he's talking about. He was put to shame by other posters there who paragraph by paragraph debunked each of his ramblings. He came here thinking he'd get an easy ride from people with less understanding of astrophysics and orbital rotations, though that backfired on him too.

Glad to see the back of him.
Gaoth Laidir is offline  
Thanks from:
23-07-2020, 01:04   #153
igCorcaigh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 4,749
Do ye think it would be possible to see it from a city, with the light pollution and buildings?
Should I take a walk? It's partially cloudy.
igCorcaigh is offline  
23-07-2020, 02:13   #154
Purple Mountain
Registered User
 
Purple Mountain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 6,767
Quote:
Originally Posted by igCorcaigh View Post
Do ye think it would be possible to see it from a city, with the light pollution and buildings?
Should I take a walk? It's partially cloudy.
I'm in very dark countryside and it's only visible to me as a very very faint blur.
I'd say you'd be clutching at straws, especially with cloud cover.
Purple Mountain is offline  
Thanks from:
23-07-2020, 07:26   #155
M.T. Cranium
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 11,264
Yes, just in from my daily attempt to find Neowise, only possible with binoculars this evening here, probably can be seen naked-eye in the very darkest rural settings with no high cloud or light pollution (I have a bit of both unfortunately).

Was a good event though.
M.T. Cranium is offline  
Advertisement
23-07-2020, 07:47   #156
M.T. Cranium
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 11,264
Is it really an insult to be called a follower of Isaac Newton? I don't feel that insulted actually.

Oriel seemed to have some kind of an issue with the two different frames of reference that modern astronomy has developed. It's worth mentioning what these are, along with the fact that I never thought of myself as a proponent or an enthusiast for either of them.

One frame of reference is equatorial, and deals with "right ascension" as longitude and "declination" as latitude.

The other frame is ecliptic, and uses celestial longitude and latitude. The Sun is (for the purposes of this discussion) always at zero latitude because the ecliptic plane is our orbital plane, and the Sun is the centre of that (it does wobble slightly due to gravitational perturbations, on a very small scale). On June 21st at the summer solstice, the Sun is at its highest declination of the year (23.4 deg N) but at zero deg latitude. The two longitude systems begin at the vernal equinox and I believe they will stay at the 1900 epoch location of it through the centuries, as the Sun's apparent orbital nodes change (it's the earth's orbital nodes actually changing, but against the system being used, it appears that the Sun is shifting).

I know Oriel didn't like that concept and he associated it with Newton, then when he discovered I was more or less following orthodox astronomy in my research, he decided I was part of the Newton problem.

All I can say is, I understand the two systems and tend to use R.A. and dec more than lat-long. That doesn't mean that I am a "proponent" of either system, like you if I want to take part in scientific discussions, I need to understand the frames of reference being used in them. Otherwise we have anarchy where anyone can impose any system they want and discuss things as if other people knew about that system.

The irony is that even my basic interest in astronomy puts me rather at odds with the weather community who are dead set against external drivers in this day and age.

Anyway, today make a note that the earth is in the position that the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn alignment will take up mid-October. We passed Jupiter on the 14th and Saturn on the 20th. In about three months, they will reach the same heliocentric longitude -- the one we are at today. They won't quite appear aligned to us because of parallax, we will be off at right angles to that alignment, and one-fifth of the distance from the Sun compared to Jupiter (one-tenth compared to Saturn). They will appear most closely aligned in December as we swing back around towards their alignment vector which will begin to move away from the Sun as Jupiter overtakes Saturn.
M.T. Cranium is offline  
Thanks from:
23-07-2020, 12:56   #157
Calibos
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 7,353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calibos View Post
Any seasoned amateur astronomer in Ireland will quickly learn that all time limited astronomical events will be clouded out for the entire duration. If its a 5 minute thing, it'll be clouded out for that specific 5 mins. It its an hour thing it'll be clouded out for that hour. One night thing? Cloudy or that night only, week maximum for meteor shower? Cloudy all week. Comet visible for a few weeks?......................Guys, we won't be seeing the sky or Sun till August I am afraid. This comet is a Harbinger of Gloom
Quote:
Originally Posted by jogdish View Post
Wanted to ask, are we still able to see the comet much ? when does it vanish from naked eye visibility ?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purple Mountain View Post
I'm in very dark countryside and it's only visible to me as a very very faint blur.
I'd say you'd be clutching at straws, especially with cloud cover.
Neowise exactly followed the Murphys Law of Irish Astronomy and Weather.

3 Months of Clear Skies...Best Northern Hemisphere comet in nearly a quarter of a Century arrives...6+ weeks of Cloud during the Comets Naked eye phase.

I jest and exaggerate of course. Many of you had more clear skies and had wonderful naked eye views but for those that did/didn't it was very much hit/miss with a lot of right/wrong place, right/wrong time. The 2 clear sky nights I had at the end of the naked eye phase were a bust when I discovered it was lost in the Dublin Sky Glow from my perspective in Bray and with Binoculars it was lost behind two feckin cranes from my perspective in my Back Yard Arrgghhh!! (Didn't feel like a walk to the Seafront at 2am in the morning)

Still, it re-sparked my interest in Astronomy and the hobby and I dug out a small portion of my gear that was mothballed and buried a decade ago and was thrilled to find several house and wardrobe moves hadn't wrecked any of it. For example, I bought an old S/H Nexstar 102GT Tripod/Goto (without scope) right when life, health etc got in the way of the hobby for me. For Neowise I dug it out, affixed my Stellarvue F3.7 80mm Finderscope from my 16" GOTO Dob onto the Nexstar, watched a few Youtube Videos about Nexstar GT Star Alignment and the hand control functions etc and ended up getting surprisingly fantastic views of Saturn and Jupiter in such a small scope especially given they are at their lowest altitude in Sagittarius and subject to the worst potential 'Seeing'. Point is, the hardware fiddling/modding (which I always enjoyed nearly as much as the observing) and observing reminded me why I got into the hobby in the first place. I think I'm ready to jump back into the hobby with gusto again.
Calibos is offline  
26-07-2020, 13:00   #158
Scrabbel
Registered User
 
Scrabbel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 24
Gave it one last go last night to drive an hour out of Dublin and luckily getting an hour of mostly clear skies. Had to use binoculars but very clear view of Neowise with that. About the same or slightly clearer than the photos I took, like the attached.
Attached Images
File Type: jpeg 83032B4D-1CD5-463D-8E9B-4EE9ADFA00E3.jpeg (2.06 MB, 133 views)
Scrabbel is offline  
26-07-2020, 21:58   #159
M.T. Cranium
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 11,264
Had that same view eight hours later here, by then the comet made a "ten to six" pattern with those two faint stars (faint to naked eye), found a useful procedure for you binocular users to consider, focus on the crescent moon before looking at anything else, you'll find it easier to focus your view as the Moon tells you right away about focus issues.

Moon will be out a bit longer this evening (here, I think most of you are clouded out) and in a few more days, gibbous nearly full moon phase near Jupiter and Saturn.
M.T. Cranium is offline  
(2) thanks from:
Advertisement
27-07-2020, 21:31   #160
Scrabbel
Registered User
 
Scrabbel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by M.T. Cranium View Post
Had that same view eight hours later here, by then the comet made a "ten to six" pattern with those two faint stars (faint to naked eye), found a useful procedure for you binocular users to consider, focus on the crescent moon before looking at anything else, you'll find it easier to focus your view as the Moon tells you right away about focus issues.

Moon will be out a bit longer this evening (here, I think most of you are clouded out) and in a few more days, gibbous nearly full moon phase near Jupiter and Saturn.

Thanks for that great tip on the focussing. In fact I could also use that on my camera zoom lens (manual focus only as it’s via a lens adapter) to get proper focus on stars. The lens allows a little variability in infinity focus.

Last edited by Scrabbel; 27-07-2020 at 21:39.
Scrabbel is offline  
27-07-2020, 23:55   #161
Iancar29
Registered User
 
Iancar29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 5,010
One of mine from last week. Neowise silhouetted by my friend's son at the top of the Sugar Loaf.



Had a quick look out the back for it here in D11 with binoculars, found it but only to be a smudge now with a slight hue of green. Probably still looks a bit more impressive from a dark location , and possibly then too still in camera long exposures.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bnoards.jpg (384.2 KB, 149 views)
Iancar29 is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet