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13-03-2017, 19:28   #16
tac foley
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My da's lot came from Southern Scandinavia sometime in the 700-800 AD 'invasions'. We don't need a DNA analysis to tell us that - tall, blonde, mostly blue-eyed and built like brick outhouses, every male person in my dad's family going back to his great-grandfather, who died aged 96 in 1910, looked as though they had just stepped off the long boat. Scania is full of people who look exactly like us. Before that? Who knows?

The same as everybody else from that part of the world, I'd guess.

Just looking up the basis of my family name in Old Irish will get you an idea of our particular history.

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15-03-2017, 11:32   #17
hammy007
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FTDNA does Y-DNA, mtDNA, as well as autosomal DNA (family finder test). 23andme and Ancestry only do autosomal tests. Autosomal tests are good to try at different testing companies, because the ethnicity results may be slightly different, and your matches will be different. FTDNA now offers a transfer, so for example, if you've done a test at 23andme or elsewhere, you can pay a fee to transfer DNA results to FTDNA. The cost would be much less than doing another full test.

That being said, I would also highly recommend uploading your autosomal results to gedmatch.com. It is a database that compares autosomal tests from all the various testing companies for those who have uploaded, free of charge. It's a good way to compare to others who may have taken a test with a different vendor from you.

What I have found between the testing companies: I always recommend FTDNA first, because you can compare specific chromosome segments with your matches, which is a powerful tool, whereas Ancestry only shows you matches with the same names in other trees (a nice feature, but segment compares would be helpful). 23andme is more health focused, and I know a lot of people that don't like their upgraded website. I'd recommend FTDNA first, and Ancestry second.
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15-03-2017, 12:55   #18
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The Late Late show will have a section on DNA this Friday the 17th. 4 guests and Ryan Turbriody have submitted a test sample and the results will be revealed on the show.
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15-03-2017, 13:28   #19
Ipso
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As it's Saint Patrick's day I hope they don't try to play some unique Irish snowcflake nonsense and I hope they are up to date on recent findings.
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15-03-2017, 14:18   #20
th283
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I just saw that ancestry have a special offer on their DNA tests for st Patrick's day- €85 including shipping
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19-03-2017, 22:59   #21
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Just ordered mine today. Hoping it might help with a family mystery, as well as being interesting in general.
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19-03-2017, 23:27   #22
torrevieja
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Folks i have a question on this DNA

to get results you are depending on other people from all over the World to have done these DNA test in other words if your 1st 2nd 3rd etc cousins have not done these tests its unlikey you will get results or am i wrong

Ps what did people think of the results on the Late late test?

What is the difference between these Y-DNA, mtDNA, and autosomal
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20-03-2017, 07:44   #23
spurious
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I got 1400 or so 'matches' when I did the FTDNA one - mostly Americans and Australians. My mother then did hers, which helped me separate the matches into those from her side and my father's.

My father's cousin has since done it and his matches should help further.

One Irish match I have since found out is descended from my father's maternal grandmother's family and most of the Australians are through my mother's side - a Timothy Dillon who went out there about 1820.

One problem is that when you contact some matches, they don't know much of their own genealogy so you end up knowing there's a connection of some sort but not where. Also, all but maybe twenty or so matches are really very distant indeed.

I suspect it's one of these things the more people take a test, the more it will give relevant results.
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20-03-2017, 09:05   #24
jo_gil
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I completed both Family Finder (autosomal) and YDNA  testing with FTDNA and submitted sample in November 2016.

The family finder (FF) results were uploaded to my account at their website late February 2017 (waiting time 5 to 8 weeks).  The FF test compares your DNA with other testers, including anyone closely related to either of your parents, grandparents, or greatgrandparents, etc. FF will identify potential cousins (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th) but the results don’t tell exactly how your related - its an approximation. Working with this cousin you can compare family histories to try and identify who was your common ancestor.  You are likely to have mixed results. If both matches have well documented genealogy you could quickly find that common ancestor, but in many cases the paper trail is just not there. As more people test result will become that much better.

The YDNA test can only be taken by a male and compare against your fathers DNA;  his father, his father and so on as far back as you can imagine. Certainly further back than any paper records might be available. (In my case that means looking at only the Gill DNA and excluding all other family lines)  The value that I'm expecting from  this is to identify others with shared DNA in Ireland. My research focuses around Longford and Roscommon but because or Irish naming conventions and limitations with existing records I have met brick walls that hopefully this approach will help to work around. FTDNA has uploaded the results to my account but not finalized technical analysis. Hoping that will all be done soon.

As commented by others on this board, dna data can be copied over to other sites (GedMatch/ Geni / Ancestry / etc) - the more data bases you join then chances to find matches also increase. 

After chasing the paper trail for more than 20 years I'm happy to add DNA results as another tool in my efforts to build our family history 

 

Following:   Gill, Francis, Daly, Casey, Coyle, McCormick,

Counties:    Roscommon; Longford
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20-03-2017, 11:38   #25
pinkypinky
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Please use the forum search function to read other threads about DNA - good summary here.
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20-03-2017, 16:18   #26
dubhthach
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With regards to ordering multiple tests from one company to verify how accurate they are. It's worth pointing out that most of these autosomal tests (23andme, Ancestry, FTDNA FamilyFinder) use a "SNP chip" eg. a "chip" that contains circa 500k-1 million discrete testing points (probes). It's quite possible that a sample could either be low-grade or that there could be issue with some of the specific test probes.

What I would say personally is that I've done two separate Autosomal tests (and imported one of these into third company) and the results are roughly comparable.

For example in FamilyFinder (using imported 23andme data) they had me down as 90% "British Isles" -- in comparison Ancestry (new testing sample) has me as 89% Irish (range 77-100%) and 2% British. So 91% vs. 90% isn't that bad going if ye ask me.

What you have to remember of course is that their calculators are based off the sample populations they have. If for example Ancestry was to drop their Irish sample population more than likely you would the level of "British" go way up in my above sample.

One thing that's always worth doing is signing up for GEDmatch and than uploading rare data, you can than use various calculators to come up with various admixture results.

When it comes to Autosomal tests Ancestry has the scale at the moment and they are rapidly growing their database, having them on the Late Late Show was bit of clever marketing that's for sure.
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20-03-2017, 22:18   #27
torrevieja
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Folks i have a question on this DNA

to get results you are depending on other people from all over the World to have done these DNA test in other words if your 1st 2nd 3rd etc cousins have not done these tests its unlikey you will get results or am i wrong

Ps what did people think of the results on the Late late test?

What is the difference between these Y-DNA, mtDNA, and autosomal
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21-03-2017, 09:45   #28
pinkypinky
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Torrevieja, please my post above where I link to a basic description of what you're asking.
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21-03-2017, 10:15   #29
dubhthach
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Aside from the link post above a good overview can be found here in this presentation by Debbie Kennett that occurred in the RDS back in 2015:



With regards to matches, it really depends on what you are looking for. For example on a Y-DNA test you could potentially show a match with another man who you last shared a common ancestor with in the 16th century. Obviously as more people test the dataset gets bigger and bigger.

In many cases these databases are dominated by diaspora members (eg. Americans basically), getting more Irish based people into relevant databases is useful as a means of providing an anchor back to Ireland for some of these people etc. In general Ancestry and like will show you potential 4th/5th/6th cousins, given genetic recombination it's only really accurate for finding links back to about 200 years ago. After that the level of potentially shared DNA segments basically drops to 0%.

Here's some images from ISOGG wiki on cousin matching (autosomal testing)







Generally what you often see is stuff like 4th and 5th cousins pop up. Which basically drops you somewhere in the 19th century (potentially late 18th century) depending on shared ancestor.
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21-03-2017, 10:21   #30
dubhthach
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With regards to the Late Late show, well I thought it was good marketing that's for sure. The feature they showed (Genetic Communities) is currently in Beta and hasn't been rolled out let.

In case of Healy-Rae it actually make sense given that up until 1606 there existed a seperate county in West Cork/South Kerry eg. "County of Desmond" which basically reflected the Kingdom of Desmond which has resisted Cambro-Norman incursion under the rule of the McCarthy's



If you look at that map ye'll see that the "O'Healy" are down as landholders to east of Muskerry, in what is now County Cork, but which wasn't part of Cork before 1606.

It made for a great laugh, but we have to remember of course is that our concept of counties is very much a social construct that develop out of conquest, many of course do have some basis in previous overkingdoms but the boundaries are often fluid -- for example Western Offaly was historically part of Meath (Westmeath actually reflects better sub-kingdom of Midhe, whereas (East)Meath represents Brega -- within the province of Midhe), likewise part of modern Laois was part of Kingdom of Osraighe (Upper Ossory) and was bit not conquered by the Normans, the rest of Kingdom became modern county of Kilkenny.

Derrane been related to Blathanid distantly make sense in context of Conamara/Árann -- after all one of reasons the language survived as primary language in the Galway Gaeltacht was due to lack of contact/movement from the anglisced areas around it.

Byrne having wide level of matches make sense given history of Dublin both as urban area (thus potential ancestors from all over place) and also given it's history as centre of the Pale. Given that he appeared to have ancestor associated with Fermanagh this could explain his Scottish connection etc.

Last edited by dubhthach; 21-03-2017 at 10:32.
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