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27-02-2019, 22:11   #16
martyc5674
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I think we don’t use bells enough in this country.
It’s important the bell has a pleasant tone if that makes any sense.
I use mine a fair bit on shared surfaces where you have a lot of pedestrians etc that might have headphones on or might be in their own little world.
I’d always pass leaving plenty of space and slowing down a little to ensure I don’t come across as aggressive.
I’d often use it in circumstances where sailing past might spook someone... but I’d ring way ahead.
I think it’s just courtesy... in France if you hear a bell you just move over... I suppose out on the road there should be less use for it but as greenways etc start to develop in this country it’s a good thing to have on the bike.
I encourage my kids to use them all the time, but to use them in time and not aggressively.
Marty.
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28-02-2019, 23:30   #17
 
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Safety should trump etiquette. I would continue to use the bell in the manner you said; if they are weaving in and out. The amount of cyclists I see moving out to the right before looking or not looking at all.

The bell is for precisely this reason. If people take it in annoyance well that's the way they choose to see it, it's not your fault.
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01-03-2019, 06:52   #18
Lumen
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Originally Posted by schemingbohemia View Post
she says as I overtake - "Ding Ding yourself"
The correct response to this is...

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01-03-2019, 07:54   #19
Wishbone Ash
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...If people take it in annoyance well that's the way they choose to see it, it's not your fault.
Have you read the first post? The cyclist the OP passed was not weaving in and out, hence her annoyance at the unnecessary use of a bell.

When you are driving, do you sound a horn at every other vehicle you pass?
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01-03-2019, 08:09   #20
Peter T
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IF you're being overtaken in a car there's a good chance you'll spot them in your mirror and hopefully vice versa. I wouldn't take offence to someone ringing a bell, someone isnt going to know you're there unless they look over a shoulder. I dont commute on my bike just head out for spins but if I'm catching someone I usually give a "Rider up" so they know I'm there and will be passing
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02-03-2019, 00:14   #21
tomasrojo
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I brought up this subject before (more about the "on your right" business rather than bells). My objection was that people who do it (outside the context of club cycling and competitions) are usually passing with centimetres to spare, and their warnings aren't courteous; they're excusing their terrible passing and their impatience.

(Not saying the OP was passing with centimetres to spare.)
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02-03-2019, 00:49   #22
work
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I'd rather people let me know they are overtaking me (where there is limited overtaking space) given the occasional need to move off my line due to potholes or drains, I don't tinkle every overtake!
To be honest the other two cyclists who overtook her went too close to her in my mind, if she had veered off course even a little bit there could have been a collision, I was simply making her aware that I was about to overtake so she should ensure she stayed straight.
In fairness it isn't up to her to make your overtake easier. If she needs to avoid a pothole when you are overtaking her it's your responsibility to have left her room to do that. So saying that ringing your bell somehow puts the onus on her to "stay straight" is unreasonable in my opinion.
I wouldn't ring the bell it will just irritate people.
This is completely wrong the terrible bike lanes can require evasive action any time and if separated will not leave room for avoiding a colission. As such using your legally required (I believe?) is a good idea. I feel safer ringing to overtake and do it all the time. I do it well in advance of overtaking
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02-03-2019, 07:49   #23
CramCycle
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It's a rare occasion in Ireland where someone using a bell isn't being a pr1ck. Passing with an inch to spare and not actually even waiting to to see if it was noticed, most treat it as a, I've rang my bell, therefore I'm entitled to pass. This is why bell users rarely get unpleasant responses. Some do use bells properly, ring before being right up your ass, only ring once or twice, wait for some indication they were heard. I used to have and use one but the small number of tosspots on the n11 and elsewhere made me not want to look like a pr1ck as well or be confused with them. Get a wheel with a loud freewheel and sit back far enough that your not up their ass, if they don't notice wait until an opportunity to overtake safely without any action from them eg being able to go completely into the lane beside you presents itself.

If you insist on using one, I'd recommend one of the friendlier sounding Dutch bells, ring once or twice before your behind them and if they don't notice leave it. Do not ring it as you pass or are just starting the overtake as you may startle them.
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02-03-2019, 08:36   #24
magicbastarder
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you could just sing loudly as you cycled?

maybe not as assertively as this though:

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02-03-2019, 09:23   #25
tommythecat
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Originally Posted by work View Post
This is completely wrong the terrible bike lanes can require evasive action any time and if separated will not leave room for avoiding a colission. As such using your legally required (I believe?) is a good idea. I feel safer ringing to overtake and do it all the time. I do it well in advance of overtaking
What am I wrong about exactly? Ringing the bell doesn’t make your overtake any safer if you haven’t left room for them to avoid obstacles in front of them safely. The onus is on you to make sure you are overtaking safely, not them.
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02-03-2019, 09:42   #26
tomasrojo
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What am I wrong about exactly? Ringing the bell doesn’t make your overtake any safer if you haven’t left room for them to avoid obstacles in front of them safely. The onus is on you to make sure you are overtaking safely, not them.
Yeah, if you're passing so closely that you're worried them changing line in a small way will result in a collision, then you're carrying out a dangerous passing manoeuvre.
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02-03-2019, 11:54   #27
martyc5674
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Yeah, if you're passing so closely that you're worried them changing line in a small way will result in a collision, then you're carrying out a dangerous passing manoeuvre.
Nail on the head. That’s what it boils down to... some are using it as a “watch out” as I’m not gonna slow down others to alert as to their presence, then of course you have people waiting in the long grass to be offended.
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08-04-2019, 09:34   #28
homer911
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Cycling along the N11 cycle path this morning when I had to swerve to avoid a slightly sunken man-hole cover, at precisely the moment a cyclist from behind decided to overtake me! Our bikes interlocked for a couple of seconds before we mutually extracted ourselves and carried on. While I felt somewhat responsible and apologized during the tryst, why oh why cant fellow cyclists (a) buy and use a bell and (b) leave reasonable space when overtaking another cyclist. The 1.5m is not just for cars..
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08-04-2019, 10:06   #29
ULMarc
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I think ringing a bell is a good thing. Though, I am fearful of other's attitudes when I use my own bell.
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08-04-2019, 14:37   #30
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Sometimes it's hard to know how people react to a bell ringing behind them. I was on the cycle path in the Phoenix Park a couple of weeks ago, didn't ring the bell and I got a torrent of abuse for not warning the walker in the lane ahead of me of my approach.
A week later, same situation, this time I gave the bell a gentle ring to warn the walker ahead of me on the cycle path, this time I got a sneering look and a "so you got a bell for your birthday" remark. It's a no win.
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