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25-01-2017, 12:17   #31
Type 17
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Originally Posted by Hungrycol View Post
I was hoping for some magic way of removing the freewheel by just loosing the doo-haa, unscrewing the thingy and pulling the whatsit. Such a crappy system that needs redesigning so the freewheel can be removed from the hub without removing the axel. Bring back the old days where the freewheel was attached to the cassette which was screwed on to the hub.
It would be easier, but the freehub/cassette design had to be introduced because wheels with 7 and more sprockets put too much load on the axle of a screw on freewheel hub. 6 & 7-speed screw-on freewheels are still common on older, low-spec bikes, and axle breakages are common.
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25-01-2017, 21:32   #32
outfox
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any tips on looking after a steel frame? my latest purchase has mountings for racks and also a couple of unthreaded holes - should i tape those up to keep water out, or leave them uncovered to let the water out should it get in?
I did a lot of reading online about those holes. The general view seems to be to leave them open, and to stand the bike on its rear wheel for 30 s after a wet ride to let any water drain out through the holes in the chainstays. Water is likely going to get into the frame via the seat post clamp anyway, so it's no harm to have a drainage point, especially with a steel bike.
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10-02-2017, 10:17   #33
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if you pointed it at areas which contain bearings, yes, you could end up driving out grease.
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10-02-2017, 10:40   #34
Senecio
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Want to clean my bike... would it be a bad idea to use a power hose? This is a high end power washer for tractors. Could I damage the bike?
Something with that much power I wouldn't take near a bike. It would be too hard to control and keep away from sensitive parts. A small domestic machine would probably be OK.

I have one of these from when I live in an apartment without an outside hose. Perfect for the bike as there isn't enough pressure to do any serious damage.

http://www.nomadwasher.com/
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11-02-2017, 20:33   #35
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Which parts of the bike would be the most vulnerable? Was thinking of doing the wheels separately. Then wrapping the chain etc before washing the frame?
Basically any part that has bearings/grease or has pivot-points/bushes/lubrication.
This means that you should also exclude the headset, bottom bracket, pedals, brake calliper pivots, brake/gear cable ends, derailleur pivot-points and brake levers/gear shifters.

What that means is that there are so few safe areas that you could safely spray with a jet washer, that you should avoid using one and instead wet the dirt with a hose (standard domestic tap-pressure) or a Muc-off trigger spray or similar, and then agitate the heavier dirt with a dishwashing brush or similar, and then rinse with the same low-pressure hose. You can then bump the excess water off the bike and lubricate all the areas/points mentioned above with light spray oil and do the chain with your favourite wet or dry lube, depending on the current weather conditions. Taking the wheels off will help reach tricky areas, You can also remove the right crank/chainwheel if required.
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11-02-2017, 20:47   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deedsie View Post
Want to clean my bike... would it be a bad idea to use a power hose? This is a high end power washer for tractors. Could I damage the bike?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deedsie View Post
Which parts of the bike would be the most vulnerable? Was thinking of doing the wheels separately. Then wrapping the chain etc before washing the frame?
It's only a bike 5 mins with a sponge and 30secs with a hose and it's clean. You'd be done before you got the power washer set up. Lubing the chain etc takes longer.
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01-03-2017, 18:37   #37
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usual 'mystery noise' question. i'm 80% sure it's somewhere in or around the crankset (only happens when pedalling, also happens with hands off the bars, and pedalling out of the saddle) - a tick which usually repeats twice per full pedal revolution. what can i do to check if it's the pedal(s)? i.e. if it was the pedals, what could i do to rectify it? SPDs...
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01-03-2017, 21:54   #38
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If you have another set of pedals swap them onto the problem bike and see if the problem goes away.
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01-03-2017, 22:07   #39
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Remove the pedals, clean the threads on pedals and cranks, grease and re-fit.

(It may also be your cleats).
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02-03-2017, 08:19   #40
magicbastarder
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will have to get a pedal spanner. i did try cycling clipped in on only one side at a time, and there's definitely a click when pedalling with the right foot, and probably one when pedalling with the left foot, so it may be the BB.
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02-03-2017, 08:23   #41
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Pedal with one foot clipped in. Then do the same with the other foot. It's not an entirely reliable test but if the noise persists in both cases then it might point at something "shared" like the bottom bracket, chain, etc. If the noise arises on one side only them it might be a pedal or crank (or one of those spiteful noises that only applies when pressure is applied in a very specific direction so theoretically should arise when putting pressure on either pedal but chooses to respond only to one side).

Also worth checking the bolts holding your chainrings on, in case any of them is/are loose.
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02-03-2017, 08:30   #42
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will have to get a pedal spanner.
Can you not take it off with an Allen key? I'd agree it's probably the threads have dried out.
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02-03-2017, 08:33   #43
magicbastarder
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Also worth checking the bolts holding your chainrings on, in case any of them is/are loose.
ah, must check this.
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02-03-2017, 08:42   #44
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For the record, it's worth greasing all of the threads in the pedals/chainset/chainrings/bottom bracket, as well as the front derailleur and the bolts that hold the brake callipers to the frame/forks - spray from the wheels causes corrosion there, sometimes leading to clicking, but more importantly, leading to threads seizing, making it impossible to remove parts without damage - A few times, I have torn the threads out of crank-arms on customer's bikes because the steel pedal axle and aluminium crank had seized together so badly (new crank arm required, clean out pedal threads with a hacksaw blade).
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02-03-2017, 12:58   #45
route66
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Originally Posted by magicbastarder View Post
will have to get a pedal spanner. i did try cycling clipped in on only one side at a time, and there's definitely a click when pedalling with the right foot, and probably one when pedalling with the left foot, so it may be the BB.
I'd a similar noise on my Felt Z6. I To address this, I did the following:

  • Checked this website for info on how to locate and banish all unwanted bike noises.
  • Changed the saddle
  • Put carbon grease on the seatpost
  • Lubricated all contact points between the saddle and the seatpost
  • Lubricated the seat post clamp
  • Lubricated all points where cables and frame met
  • Changed the BB
  • Greased the dropouts
  • Checked the pedals carefully
  • Checked the wheels carefully
  • Checked the frame carefully
  • Greased the headset
  • Changed the headset
  • Upgraded the entire groupset from Tiagra to 105 (included a hollowtech II BB, all cables, etc)
None of which worked


Admittedly, some of this work I was planning on doing anyway (the groupset), but it was more than a little frustrating to hear the noise - mine was a "dry creak" that was linked to pedal rotation - without being able to do anything about it.

And then I fixed it and all is now silent.

The solution? I put carbon grease on the seatpost once again, but properly this time - used this stuff.

Actually, I kinda miss the noise now
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