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22-05-2020, 08:44   #31
The Student
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Originally Posted by KiKi III View Post
Where did you get the idea that I want to break my lease? I want to renegotiate the terms, it’s a fairly different thing.

Anecdotally, I know a lot of non-Irish in Dublin are moving to their home countries, and irish people who work for Facebook etc moving back to their home county because their working from home until at least Christmas. The supply coming on isn’t just Airbnb. Also, a lot of international students who would usually be arriving in August/ September simply won’t be.

I don’t really care about the good tenant/ bad tenant argument. We could definitely say I’m a long-term and reliable tenant if that makes it easier to understand.

Right now there is a 3 bedroom on my street for €100 less per month than my 2 bed. I know my landlord has a good few properties vacant at the moment because I can see them on Daft (exact same fittings and decor as mine)

Anyway, thanks for your input. Having read a bit online I understand it’s better to speak to the agency over the phone than email in the first instance so I’ll do that.

I’ll explain that we’re considering moving to one of the similar but cheaper properties in the area, but that we would consider staying if they could reach some compromise with us on rent.
You were getting below market rent for the last couple of years so. I am a landlord in a rpz and both of my properties are 20% and 33% below market rate.

You are looking to reduce your rent which we all would try if you can that's a rational business decision. Personally I would not agree because of the anti landlord stance of the Govt.

The landlord does not know the long term implications of their agreeing to a reduction. I would rent it for short term of 5 months at a time to give me the flexibility to hold the rent at the normal rates after covid and the new normal.
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22-05-2020, 16:46   #32
the_syco
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Originally Posted by KiKi III View Post
I’m self-employed and my income has reduced, while my housemate was laid off for a few weeks and just went back to work today.

We think we’re in a reasonable position to renegotiate our rent, but don’t know the best way to approach it.
The above is the reason why you need to reduce it. You need a business reason to reduce it.

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Originally Posted by KiKi III View Post
Anecdotally, I know a lot of non-Irish in Dublin are moving to their home countries, and irish people who work for Facebook etc moving back to their home county because their working from home until at least Christmas. The supply coming on isn’t just Airbnb. Also, a lot of international students who would usually be arriving in August/ September simply won’t be.
This could be used as a business reason why your rent should be reduced; that if not, you'll move. But do not be surprised if the LL tells you to move if you want, as I'd say some LL's will be looking at reducing their portfolio shortly.
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22-05-2020, 23:20   #33
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Originally Posted by KiKi III View Post
Where did you get the idea that I want to break my lease? I want to renegotiate the terms, it’s a fairly different thing.

Anecdotally, I know a lot of non-Irish in Dublin are moving to their home countries, and irish people who work for Facebook etc moving back to their home county because their working from home until at least Christmas. The supply coming on isn’t just Airbnb. Also, a lot of international students who would usually be arriving in August/ September simply won’t be.

I don’t really care about the good tenant/ bad tenant argument. We could definitely say I’m a long-term and reliable tenant if that makes it easier to understand.

Right now there is a 3 bedroom on my street for €100 less per month than my 2 bed. I know my landlord has a good few properties vacant at the moment because I can see them on Daft (exact same fittings and decor as mine)

Anyway, thanks for your input. Having read a bit online I understand it’s better to speak to the agency over the phone than email in the first instance so I’ll do that.

I’ll explain that we’re considering moving to one of the similar but cheaper properties in the area, but that we would consider staying if they could reach some compromise with us on rent.
When was your last rent review? Because if it's been in the last year the landlord can't do another due to the RPZ legislation. So your only option is to leave or pay what's in your contract.
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22-05-2020, 23:30   #34
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Asking costs nothing.

Don’t threaten to move out unless you intend to follow though. Nothing as pathetic as someone who turns out to me making empty threats.

If there are houses available €200 a month cheaper near you and you couldn’t be arsed moving then you don’t really need a rent reduction.

What has a landlord to loose playing hardball and holding out, if you buckle and stay he keeps the higher rent, if you leave he will fill the place and so has lost nothing.
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22-05-2020, 23:40   #35
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I don't think you understand the word "dystopian". Doing the basics doesn't make you "good" it makes you basic. Where is the landlord in that situation at fault? Doing things the easiest way possible is good for everyone.

What is so terrible about a tenant switching off the water themselves and calling a plumber? If they owned the place would they leave the leak all night?

Yes I am a landlord and arrived at 2:30 am to shut off the water because the tenant couldn't find the shut off when told. They drunkenly tripped and smash the sink and broke the taps off. Are they a good or bad tenant in your eyes?
Would part of being a "basic" landlord not be to inform all new tenants where the mains shut off valve is under the kitchen sink and where the hot and cold shut off valves are in the hot press, with a few labels attached to direct them in case there is a leak at 2am in the morning? It would surely save you a lot of money on water damage repair too.
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23-05-2020, 17:59   #36
KiKi III
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Originally Posted by _Brian View Post
Asking costs nothing.

Don’t threaten to move out unless you intend to follow though. Nothing as pathetic as someone who turns out to me making empty threats.

If there are houses available €200 a month cheaper near you and you couldn’t be arsed moving then you don’t really need a rent reduction.

What has a landlord to loose playing hardball and holding out, if you buckle and stay he keeps the higher rent, if you leave he will fill the place and so has lost nothing.
Whether I “really need it” or not isn’t the question at hand. The question is whether the property is worth the rent we are currently paying for it.
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23-05-2020, 18:00   #37
KiKi III
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When was your last rent review? Because if it's been in the last year the landlord can't do another due to the RPZ legislation. So your only option is to leave or pay what's in your contract.
This doesn’t sound right. I would have thought this clause means they can’t increase my rent more than once in a year. I would have thought a decrease is generally considered welcome in an RPZ.
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23-05-2020, 19:52   #38
Del2005
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This doesn’t sound right. I would have thought this clause means they can’t increase my rent more than once in a year. I would have thought a decrease is generally considered welcome in an RPZ.
A rent review is a rent review if the price goes up or down. With the bias of the RTB I could see a tenant successfully claiming against a landlord for an illegal rent review if they reduce the rent out of sequence.
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23-05-2020, 20:55   #39
KiKi III
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A rent review is a rent review if the price goes up or down. With the bias of the RTB I could see a tenant successfully claiming against a landlord for an illegal rent review if they reduce the rent out of sequence.
Hmmm I had a look at the site and I don’t think you have that right but will give the RTB a call on Monday to confirm.
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24-05-2020, 13:21   #40
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This doesn’t sound right. I would have thought this clause means they can’t increase my rent more than once in a year. I would have thought a decrease is generally considered welcome in an RPZ.
A landlord is not entitled to review the rent more than once in a 12 month period. He/she cannot adjust the rent my more than 4% per annum in an RPZ (a prorata increase or decrease may apply, if the last review was more than 12 months ago).

The whole premise of the Residential Tenancies Act and the Rent Review process/procedure- is to cap rents at increases of 4% per annum in RPZs. It doesn't really address the current situation where rents may be falling at greater than 4% per annum- when I spoke with the RTB about it- their comment was if the market rent is below the current rent level, presumably a tenant would move to a cheaper dwelling, to reflect the difference in rent.

Aka- the legislation, as it currently stands, does not recognise the current situation we find ourselves in- and the onus is on a tenant to move if they want to pay lower rent.

From a landlord's perspective- it is possible that a landlord may try to invoke the 4% pa limit (which was phrased as an upward limit), as a reciprochal 4% pa downward limit at the next rent review..........

The legislation- and the interpretation of it- are out of step with the times we find ourselves in.
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Today, 15:36   #41
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Kiki, prepare for the talk with your landlord:

1. Apply for a few similar apt from Daft and view them. If offered a place for €1500 or less tell them that you need 1-2 days to respond. During those 2 days talk to your current landlord and:

a) show them a sample of 3 similar properties in the area for much less to your current rent (print shot Dafy ads),
b) remind him that you are here for 6 years and like his place, you have never been a pain or a bad tenant in any way, shape or form,
c) tell him that your salary decreased by 10-20% (you can provide evidence if he requests)
d) tell him that if you part ways there is no guarantee for him to get the same rent price that you pay and that the new tenants could make his life a living hell. He will also have the stress of advertisement, viewing, refreshing the place for the new tenants, dealing with queries from tenants, calls, new RTB tenancy registration with extra fees, setting them up with energy/bank accounts, etc.
e) tell him that you just got accepted for a new place with a lower rent and that tomorrow morning you have to give the new landlord a deposit
f) you said that your current landlord is "giving" you 50% off your rent right now but you have to pay it later so this is not really a help but just an approved delayed rent payment. Tell him that your co-workers, friends and neighbours negotiated a rent reduction by 10-15% or even a rent relief for 1-2 months so what you managed to achieve with him is not really a help as he will eventually get 100% of his rent.

2. If your landlord does not agree with the 6 points above I strongly advise you to move to a cheaper place. You may feel comfortable where you are but remember that it's not your place and will never be so treat it like a hotel and dont get used to or fall in love with it. Change is good for all involved.
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