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19-05-2011, 23:24   #16
Dazzler88
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I read an interview with Charlie Kerrigan quite a while ago and what I most remember about it was that when they arrived back in Ireland their was no reception or fanfare for the Connaught Rangers, it wasn't until quite a while later their bravery became recognised. The country may well have been bracing itself for the Civil War or whatever. From what I roughly remember Charlie Kerigan just got the train in Dublin down to Sligo and made his way out to Glencar to the warm welcome of his family and neighbours. Though doubtless the surviving Connaught Rangers would have probably shrugged their shoulders and probably said they hadn't done it for medals or glory but of outrage and concern for the people of Ireland back home.
This information is correct.Charlie got the train to Sligo and headed walking across the mountain to Glencar,there wasnt even any welcome home party for him in Glencar.He always said it wasnt until the late 70's that people started calling to the house to ask him about his time in India.To our family he was a bit of a celebrity but to everyone else it was just another old man who had an old war story to tell.Up until the late 90's,his son still had his medals but over the last few decades they became lost,I regret this happening as they are of great importance.Also the Connaught Rangers musemn in Boyle,Co.Roscommon barely opens anymore due to lack of government funding,as time goes on these bravemen will be forgotten.
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19-05-2011, 23:38   #17
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one "memorial" to consider for the Connaught "mutineers" was that the tri-colour they flew partly influenced the decision re the modern Indian flag (as did the whole Irish independence movement of the period).

A film of the mutiny is long overdue.
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20-05-2011, 00:00   #18
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definetly agree,long overdue.
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01-07-2013, 17:18   #19
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Just found this photo of the Mutineers from India 1920.Can anyone name any of them men in the photo?Unfortunately,they only have 2 people named.
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File Type: jpg Connaught Rangers.jpg (57.8 KB, 573 views)
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02-07-2013, 09:30   #20
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Gene Kerrigan has written a book on the history of the Connaught Rangers which covers their "mutiny" in India.

There were of course many other mutinies in both the Royal Navy and Army.

The 1857 Sepoy Mutiny ( Rebellion to Indan Nationalists ) was the major one.

the interesting thing about the British time in India is why such a small amount of British troops, and their Indian Civil Service could control such a large subcontinent.

As in Ireland, they left in a hurry,leaving divisions which lead to further trouble
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02-07-2013, 10:11   #21
 
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There is a book that covers the mutiny - The Devil to Pay.....

.....it's ok as an account, but the author (Babington) seems to have it in for them (the mutineers) and the lack of objectivity spoils it.

I found the book when I was researching my great grandfather who served with 2nd Bn at 1st Mons where he was wounded.

We knew he had been in the Rangers and wondered if he'd been involved in the mutiny, but he was eventually invalided out of the army in 1916.
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02-07-2013, 15:26   #22
 
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one "memorial" to consider for the Connaught "mutineers" was that the tri-colour they flew partly influenced the decision re the modern Indian flag (as did the whole Irish independence movement of the period).
There is a tenuous link between the flags, that the colours are identical or near identical is coincidence, orange/saffron being associated with Hinduism, the colour green with Islam, and white signifying peace. An updated meaning (possibly downplaying the religious aspect and associated conflicts) has interpreted the saffron as representing courage and sacrifice; the white representing purity and truth; and the green standing for faith, fertility and chivalry.

An earlier (1906) proposal for an Indian flag has a more direct Irish link, the designer being a Co Tyrone born woman Margaret Elizabeth Noble or as she was known in India, Sister Nivedita. The proposal was not taken up by the Indian nationalist movement though.

Last edited by gobnaitolunacy; 02-07-2013 at 15:30.
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03-07-2013, 00:07   #23
 
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From the linked wikipedia Singapore mutiny page:

Quote:
More than 200 sepoys were tried by court-martial, and 47 were executed
From the article on the Connacht mutiny:

Quote:
In August, 1920, court martial proceeding against 800 men began. The proceedings were conducted at the army headquarters at Simla. Day after day, sentences were passed. Hundreds were to be shot, many sentenced to life imprisonment and the remaining awarded 10 to 20 years of hard labour in lock-ups.... Any defiance by a soldier amounted to an act of mutiny and this had to be firmly established for the dignity and honour of military tradition. To achieve this, somebody had made a scapegoat — symbolic of fair but firm treatment.

The one so chosen was Jim Daley.
Thank God we're white, it seems.
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03-07-2013, 09:30   #24
 
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This information is correct.Charlie got the train to Sligo and headed walking across the mountain to Glencar,there wasnt even any welcome home party for him in Glencar.He always said it wasnt until the late 70's that people started calling to the house to ask him about his time in India.To our family he was a bit of a celebrity but to everyone else it was just another old man who had an old war story to tell.Up until the late 90's,his son still had his medals but over the last few decades they became lost,I regret this happening as they are of great importance.Also the Connaught Rangers musemn in Boyle,Co.Roscommon barely opens anymore due to lack of government funding,as time goes on these bravemen will be forgotten.
In the absence of government funding surely the local people could organise a voluntary committee to run the museum and have defined opening hours. Boyle and the general North Roscommon area have a number historical attractions e.g Boyle Abbey, Strokestown House, Arigna Mines etc. which could be promoted. There are many people who enjoy historical outings while on holidays. The Connaught Rangers should be commemorated not only for the mutiny but also because of their involvement in WW1 and other campaigns.
Am I correct in saying that there is a Connaught Rangers museum in Renmore Barracks Galway?
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03-07-2013, 10:15   #25
 
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Originally Posted by nuac View Post
Gene Kerrigan has written a book on the history of the Connaught Rangers which covers their "mutiny" in India.

There were of course many other mutinies in both the Royal Navy and Army.

The 1857 Sepoy Mutiny ( Rebellion to Indan Nationalists ) was the major one.

the interesting thing about the British time in India is why such a small amount of British troops, and their Indian Civil Service could control such a large subcontinent.

As in Ireland, they left in a hurry,leaving divisions which lead to further trouble
The mutinies at Spithead and Nore are probably the best well known navy ones (HMS Bounty aside) and Etaple in 1917 the most recent by the British British army.
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03-07-2013, 10:31   #26
nuac
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From the linked wikipedia Singapore mutiny page:



From the article on the Connacht mutiny:



Thank God we're white, it seems.
I dont know anything about the Signapore mutiny but I think reasons for dealing comparatively leniently with the Rangers were

1. Their great record in the BA, especially in the Peninsular war under Wellington

2. The fact that many of the British senior officers stationed at the Curragh n 1914 threatened mutiny if ask to go to Ulster following Home Rule legislation.

Even then the execution of Daly was an over-reaction
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03-07-2013, 20:46   #27
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In the absence of government funding surely the local people could organise a voluntary committee to run the museum and have defined opening hours. Boyle and the general North Roscommon area have a number historical attractions e.g Boyle Abbey, Strokestown House, Arigna Mines etc. which could be promoted. There are many people who enjoy historical outings while on holidays. The Connaught Rangers should be commemorated not only for the mutiny but also because of their involvement in WW1 and other campaigns.
Am I correct in saying that there is a Connaught Rangers museum in Renmore Barracks Galway?

There is a nice museum in Renmore http://renmorehistory.ie/index.php?o...&catid=40:info
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03-07-2013, 21:05   #28
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Glad I found this thread. My grandfather, Tom Tierney, from Bohermore in Galway was one of the mutineers. He died when I was only one, so I never knew him.

He did feature in the book "The Connaught Rangers" by T.P. Kilfeather. I have the relevant passages here, so I hope it's okay to quote them.

---------------

Those who continued with the mutiny had a number of hours to reflect upon the seriousness of what they had done and what they now proposed to do. Perhaps most of them were thinking the same thoughts as Private Thomas Tierney, from Galway city. He had taken an oath of allegiance to King George V when he was scarcely eighteen years of age, urged on by appeals from posters, which were plastered on every blank wall in Galway. Those posters told of German atrocities in France and in Belgium. In the uniform of the king, he had served in the Inniskilling Fusiliers and the Connaught Rangers. Now the Black-and-Tans were doing in Ireland what the Germans were said to have done elsewhere. How, then, should a man regard an oath of loyalty to a king who permitted these things to happen? Private Tierney solved that problem with the answer: “I owe no further allegiance.”

At ten o’clock Colonel Deacon left his quarters and strode across the barracks, accompanied by all the officers of the battalion. “Men of the Rangers,” he barked, “I am about to order you to fall in. I do so in the name of the king. If you do not obey you will be dealt with by the full rigour of military law. All of you know what that means.”

Only two men refused to parade with the main body – Private Tierney, of Galway, and Lance-Corporal Willis, of Mullingar. His company quartermaster-sergeant approached Tierney and shouted, “fall in with your company.” The private replied: “Give the men in the cells the same option you have given me. If they are guilty of mutiny, I’m guilty too.”

Tierney was marched over to the cells in company with Willis. As they neared the other prisoners they were greeted with a wild Irish cheer.
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05-07-2013, 09:50   #29
 
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[QUOTE=kabakuyu;85372132]There is a nice museum in Renmore http://renmorehistory.ie/index.php?o...nfo[/QUOTE]

Thanks for that.

For those interested in military history there is also a museum at the Curragh Camp and as Cathal Brugha Barracks Dublin (This one is not very extensive but still interesting)

Opening hours etc on Defence Force website
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26-07-2014, 11:33   #30
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photograph

Dazzler88 man sitted far left on ground is named as James Joseph Devers 32328 on Irishmedals Org site (Im new, cant post link!) . "Born in Ballina County Mayo. Described on the charge sheet as wearing a Sinn Fein Badge during the mutiny."
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