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07-09-2017, 13:30   #16
pedroeibar1
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Probably an error. RGM is correct above, an Irish surname could denote an Irish father e.g. a slave owner who recognised an illig. child which took the paternal name.
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07-09-2017, 18:25   #17
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Probably an error. RGM is correct above, an Irish surname could denote an Irish father e.g. a slave owner who recognised an illig. child which took the paternal name.
Definitely not in this case though since John and both parents were Irish and he was from Ireland.
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08-09-2017, 09:49   #18
pedroeibar1
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A cure for rheumatism here . It does not state if it is to be used topically or orally, so be careful before you try it!
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08-09-2017, 21:02   #19
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Someone doodling on the memorial of deeds here http://bit.ly/2eSSjx5 wonder who Bill Snooks was?
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09-09-2017, 09:35   #20
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I came across a record of a relative's death in America. It's definitely him but the strange thing is that his race is recorded as black. Do you think that it's an error in transcription or an error in recording? They'd hardly be using a term like 'black Irish' in an official document.
Watched this film again last night and remembered this post.
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11-09-2017, 03:34   #21
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A cure for rheumatism here . It does not state if it is to be used topically or orally, so be careful before you try it!
"Bill Snooks" used to be one of those names like "John Smith" or "Sean Citizen" who represented an ordinary, unremarkable person although Bill, for some reason, was usually an unremarkable person in a faintly ridiculous situation. He used to turn up occasionally in law textbooks where he would, e.g., suffer some injury or indignity in the street and the student was then invited to consider whether he could recover in nuisance, or he would leave his umbrella at his club and somebody else would take it and the possibility of actions for trover, detinue and conversion would be discussed at length. (The student who made the point that buying a new umbrella would be cheaper would receive a failing grade.)

But Bill turned up other than in law books. If a young gentleman in high spirits was arrested for being drunk and disorderly in London, and was brought up before the magistrates, if he wished to avoid being expelled from his Oxford or Cambridge college it was prudent to exercise a certain latitude when giving his name and address to the court, and "Bill Snooks" was one of the names occasionally employed in this context.
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11-09-2017, 10:06   #22
RGM
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Probably an error. RGM is correct above, an Irish surname could denote an Irish father e.g. a slave owner who recognised an illig. child which took the paternal name.
I don't think that's what I said. In America, an Irish surname does not necessarily denote anything, especially not in the context of black Americans. Irish surnames were taken on by black American families for a number of different reasons. Biological descent from an Irishman, or line of Irish origin, could not be assumed.
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11-09-2017, 10:13   #23
pedroeibar1
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"Bill Snooks" used to be one of those names like "John Smith" or "Sean Citizen" who represented an ordinary, unremarkable person .....
Poor old Bill, he died with the coming of the motor and was replaced by the man on the Clapham omnibus!
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01-12-2017, 14:53   #24
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Jeremiah Sullivan, who was 30 in 1901, aged 25 years between then and 1911, probably in an attempt to get the pension early. Fortunately for him his wife only aged 13 years in the same length of time.

You can see in the Household Return form that he wrote "50" to start with, and then crossed out the "0" and replaced it with a "5". No point in doing things by halves.

http://census.nationalarchives.ie/pa...lage_/1510284/

http://census.nationalarchives.ie/pa...eenagh/638910/
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01-12-2017, 15:06   #25
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The baptism of a child of John Frost and Catherine Frieze

https://search.findmypast.ie/record?...fbap%2f4810153
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02-12-2017, 00:44   #26
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Jeremiah Sullivan, who was 30 in 1901, aged 25 years between then and 1911, probably in an attempt to get the pension early. Fortunately for him his wife only aged 13 years in the same length of time.

You can see in the Household Return form that he wrote "50" to start with, and then crossed out the "0" and replaced it with a "5". No point in doing things by halves.

http://census.nationalarchives.ie/pa...lage_/1510284/

http://census.nationalarchives.ie/pa...eenagh/638910/
Jeremiah Sullivan also almost forgot how many children he had!
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02-12-2017, 00:45   #27
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The baptism of a child of John Frost and Catherine Frieze

https://search.findmypast.ie/record?...fbap%2f4810153
Can't access - no sub!
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02-12-2017, 09:04   #28
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No need for a sub - just consider how apt if Mr. Frost and Ms. Frieze had been from Birr.
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02-12-2017, 12:02   #29
KildareFan
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Here it is on the NLI site:
https://registers.nli.ie//registers/...ge/63/mode/1up
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02-12-2017, 12:14   #30
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Sorry. No sub required, but you do need to register.

Code:
First name(s)	Anne
Last name	Frost
Birth year	-
Baptism year	1819
Baptism date	06 Sep 1819
Parish	St. Mary's, Limerick City
Alternative parish names	St. Mary's, Limerick
Diocese	Limerick
County	Limerick
Country	Ireland
Father's first name(s)	John
Father's last name	Frost
Mother's first name(s)	Catharine
Mother's last name	Frieze
Repository	National Library of Ireland
National Library of Ireland link	https://registers.nli.ie//registers/...ge/63/mode/1up
Attached Images
File Type: png FrostNFrieze.png (114.9 KB, 16 views)
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