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Bicycle Grease under your Nails

  • #1
    Registered Users, Regional North Mods Posts: 15,127 kerry4sam


    For female cyclists who like to do some DIY on their own bikes:

    For those times you cannot get all the grease out from under your nails ; just use some colourful light brown nail-varnish until you do :)

    In my last job at the Hotel Front-Desk we were not permitted to wear striking coloured nail-narnish. One day I went in with this light browny-shiny varnish. Spotted by one of the Chefs who commented on it's beauty ; confession followed by me - working late the previous night on my bike and couldn't get all the damn grease out from under my nails, even after filling them down to the last so I just used this beautiful light brown shiny vanish :o

    Try washing powder ; soap ; nail-scrubber ; nail-files ; <- they fail, just use some colourful light brown shiny nail-varnish.

    Problem solved disguised for work the next-day,
    kerry4sam


Comments



  • Acetone is nasty. One of the problems is that since it's water soluble it will soak into your skin and carry dissolved nasties into your bloodstream.

    Hot soapy water , like really soapy water is great for this sort of stuff, and minor cuts too.

    The guaranteed way of cleaning your nails is to wash your hair, plenty of shampoo hot/warm water and give a good scrub.




  • A good way to remove dirty oil and grease stains from your hands and finger nails is to use another oil- olive oil. Olive oil won't harm your skin but if used on some kitchen towels and worked under the nails it does a pretty good job of removing the worst of the oil, followed by hot water soap and nail brush!




  • Olive oil won't harm your skin but if used on some kitchen towels and worked under the nails it does a pretty good job of removing the worst of the oil, followed by hot water soap and nail brush!

    I heard that's good




  • You could also dampen a bar of soap until it gets slightly softer -not soggy- and scratch the bar until the soap completely fills the area under your nails. Then wash and scrub the nails well with warm water.

    Bicarbonate of soda and warm vinegar would also help, as would very diluted washing soda, but the latter might ruin your skin so use with caution.

    That Astonish paste for cleaning cookers is also very effective, and it's not too harsh on the skin.




  • New Home wrote: »
    You could also dampen a bar of soap until it gets slightly softer -not soggy- and scratch the bar until the soap completely fills the area under your nails. Then wash and scrub the nails well with warm water.
    I was wondering if something similar could be done BEFORE working on the bike, smearing something like soap under your nails so it forms a barrier.


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  • Washing up liquid and a spoon of sugar. Try it.




  • rubadub wrote: »
    I was wondering if something similar could be done BEFORE working on the bike, smearing something like soap under your nails so it forms a barrier.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrier_cream




  • rubadub wrote: »
    I was wondering if something similar could be done BEFORE working on the bike, smearing something like soap under your nails so it forms a barrier.
    Bike mechanics use disposable latex gloves, although household gloves could also be used. Note that some people can be allergic to latex, so nitrile rubber, polyvinyl chloride and neoprene are alternatives.




  • Victor wrote: »
    Bike mechanics use disposable latex gloves
    i know 2 bike mechanics and it is very rare to see them wear gloves. I do many jobs on my own bike and have PVC & latex gloves but usually work without them. They are horrible to wear if doing any fiddly stuff. In most youtube videos they wear none. I only wear them if cleaning a chain or something "non fiddly" but messy.

    I wear thicker gloves if there is a risk of a spanner or some part quickly coming loose and you risk lashing your hand against something.


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