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TEACHING jobs in ENGLAND and Agencies!

124

Comments

  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Sports Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 15,201 Mod ✭✭✭✭ rebel girl 15


    LeonDen wrote: »
    How did you find engage? I'm thinking of registering with them and their iday event sounds quite helpful but I've also heard that they aren't that supportive after you've gotten a job.

    Great for getting in the door, rubbish for supporting you afterwards. The CPD they ran in Ireland was okay, I gave one talk at it, don't know what the work shops were like after that, but some of the speakers were just about their experience, and sure at that stage everyone in the room has their job secured. The CPD they run is poor I have to say, but iday is excellent, all costs including DBS covered.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭✭ LeonDen


    Great for getting in the door, rubbish for supporting you afterwards. The CPD they ran in Ireland was okay, I gave one talk at it, don't know what the work shops were like after that, but some of the speakers were just about their experience, and sure at that stage everyone in the room has their job secured. The CPD they run is poor I have to say, but iday is excellent, all costs including DBS covered.

    So in terms of helping you with accommodation and setting up bank accounts etc you wouldn't recommend them? I think the iday event will be a good way to introduce me to the interview process and up schools but will definitely be keeping my options open with other agencies too. Thanks for the advice!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,092 ✭✭✭ Dave0301


    LeonDen wrote: »
    So in terms of helping you with accommodation and setting up bank accounts etc you wouldn't recommend them? I think the iday event will be a good way to introduce me to the interview process and up schools but will definitely be keeping my options open with other agencies too. Thanks for the advice!

    The iDay is excellent. I got interviewed for 5 or 6 schools in one day, and got my top pick.

    Once I got the job I sorted everything else out myself with the help of the school.


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Sports Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 15,201 Mod ✭✭✭✭ rebel girl 15


    Setting up bank account they will sort - but not looking for accommodation. Lot of teachers sourced it by themselves or with the help of their school - they have an accommodation facebook page but its not great. It would be a case of staying in the local area in a hotel for a few days and looking really.


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Sports Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 15,201 Mod ✭✭✭✭ rebel girl 15


    Have to remember at the end of the day those consultants are recruiters, and work on commission for every person they place, sure once you are placed, they move on


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,134 gubbie


    LeonDen wrote: »
    So in terms of helping you with accommodation and setting up bank accounts etc you wouldn't recommend them? I think the iday event will be a good way to introduce me to the interview process and up schools but will definitely be keeping my options open with other agencies too. Thanks for the advice!

    I remember my agency told me that HSBC was the best to go for for an Irish person. So I arrive in there and am told I need an interview which will just let me know if I'm even able to get an account there and that it'll take a week to get an interview.

    I decide to try Barclays. Two days and all I needed was a passport. Nothing else. I told the agency and they'd never heard of it.

    The agency were aloof with that stuff - the school helped more with accommodation.

    My tip for the iday is when you get an in-the-school interview, the most important thing is the class teaching - TES is your friend. Get the kids involved (up and doing something or working together, and make it differentiated. I think what passes as Good in Ireland is different to what passes as Good in the UK


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Sports Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 15,201 Mod ✭✭✭✭ rebel girl 15


    gubbie wrote: »
    I remember my agency told me that HSBC was the best to go for for an Irish person. So I arrive in there and am told I need an interview which will just let me know if I'm even able to get an account there and that it'll take a week to get an interview.

    I decide to try Barclays. Two days and all I needed was a passport. Nothing else. I told the agency and they'd never heard of it.

    The agency were aloof with that stuff - the school helped more with accommodation.

    My tip for the iday is when you get an in-the-school interview, the most important thing is the class teaching - TES is your friend. Get the kids involved (up and doing something or working together, and make it differentiated. I think what passes as Good in Ireland is different to what passes as Good in the UK

    HSBC have that type of passport account as well, thats how I was initially set up with them. Get changed from a passport account to a regular account as soon as you can if you want to apply for loans or credit cards etc. Changing banks now cos I've had a few issues with them. How long ago was that, that the agency said they didn't have a clue about it???


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,134 gubbie


    HSBC have that type of passport account as well, thats how I was initially set up with them. Get changed from a passport account to a regular account as soon as you can if you want to apply for loans or credit cards etc. Changing banks now cos I've had a few issues with them. How long ago was that, that the agency said they didn't have a clue about it???

    September 2013, so 17 months


  • Registered Users Posts: 240 ✭✭ phish


    Has anyone any experience working with Tradewind recruitment? What are their day rates like?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 894 Corkgirl18


    I'm a Science and Chemistry teacher qualifying in June this year and am strongly considering going to the UK.

    I am trying to decide whether to go with an agency or not. I'd be going over by myself so would I be better off going with an agency for security?
    If I don't go with an agency do I just directly apply for jobs on sites like tes.co.uk.
    I'm fairly clueless.


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  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Sports Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 15,201 Mod ✭✭✭✭ rebel girl 15


    Your best bet is to start with an agency, and go from there. They can sort DBS checks and set up all the interviews and stuff.

    If you have a look through the thread, there are a number of different agencies, and different people have difference experiences. I found Engage IDay to be a good process, though the "training" day was rubbish, rehashing what we have spent hours in lectures for. You meet with a number of different schools on the same day, pick your top few and the schools pick their top candidates. If they match, you are invited to the school to teach a lesson or part of a lesson. All costs, flights and accommodation are paid for.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭✭ LeonDen


    Corkgirl18 wrote: »
    I'm a Science and Chemistry teacher qualifying in June this year and am strongly considering going to the UK.

    I am trying to decide whether to go with an agency or not. I'd be going over by myself so would I be better off going with an agency for security?
    If I don't go with an agency do I just directly apply for jobs on sites like tes.co.uk.
    I'm fairly clueless.


    I'm in the same boat as you, don't have a clue how to go about it! I'm registered with Engage and I'm going to their iDay event in May and they've been really helpful so far!


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Sports Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 15,201 Mod ✭✭✭✭ rebel girl 15


    I'll warn you, really helpful until they land you a job into a school, then its very little communication - that was my experience with them anyway.

    PM if you need any help with lesson plans or advice - been through the process!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 894 Corkgirl18


    I'll warn you, really helpful until they land you a job into a school, then its very little communication - that was my experience with them anyway.

    PM if you need any help with lesson plans or advice - been through the process!

    Thanks a million for the information so far. Every little helps. I've gotten on to Engage anyway. I'll see how that goes.
    Besides checking OFSTED reports is there anything else you should really check/ask before getting involved with a school?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 894 Corkgirl18


    LeonDen wrote: »
    I'm in the same boat as you, don't have a clue how to go about it! I'm registered with Engage and I'm going to their iDay event in May and they've been really helpful so far!

    Its nice to know I'm not the only one! I've gotten on to Engage so I'm going to see how it goes. By the looks of it, a lot of schools are desperate for science teachers in the UK so we should be OK.
    I'm just trying to weigh up the advantages of doing a full teaching year over there against some possible subbing over here :confused:


  • Registered Users Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ BobBobbins


    Dear nice people.

    I wanted to get opinions and advice if possible. My simple situation is that I am looking at the possibility of working in England. I have been working for five years as a primary teacher in international schools (British system), although I am a qualified secondary teacher back home. I have a wife and young daughter (whom I don't anticipate to start childcare for at least a year). My situation is that my pay will have to support the family. I am aware that it would have to be tight.

    But is it doable (as a primary teacher)?


  • Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭✭ LeonDen


    Corkgirl18 wrote: »
    Its nice to know I'm not the only one! I've gotten on to Engage so I'm going to see how it goes. By the looks of it, a lot of schools are desperate for science teachers in the UK so we should be OK.
    I'm just trying to weigh up the advantages of doing a full teaching year over there against some possible subbing over here :confused:

    I know, so hard to know whats the right thing to do! I really can't see any subbing becoming available in the area I live but I've also heard some horror stories about teaching in england!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 11,812 ✭✭✭✭ evolving_doors


    BobBobbins wrote: »
    Dear nice people.

    I wanted to get opinions and advice if possible. My simple situation is that I am looking at the possibility of working in England. I have been working for five years as a primary teacher in international schools (British system), although I am a qualified secondary teacher back home. I have a wife and young daughter (whom I don't anticipate to start childcare for at least a year). My situation is that my pay will have to support the family. I am aware that it would have to be tight.

    But is it doable (as a primary teacher)?

    I've had to read that a few times. Is this right:

    Currently in ireland.
    Working in the (British) Primary System in Ireland.
    You graduated in the UK as a secondary teacher.
    You want to teach Primary back in the UK?

    Essentially the question is... can you teach in the UK with a UK secondary qualification (and 5yrs primary experience)?


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Sports Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 15,201 Mod ✭✭✭✭ rebel girl 15


    I'll be honest - yes there are some horrific schools behavior wise, there are some horrific kids, but there is quite a few good places as well. That Educating Yorkshire etc tv program that was on, I used get phone calls from my parents "is that the type of kids you are teaching over there". Its not easy teaching over here, but it is very doable if you are organised - the responsibilities you have are quite high. The first year is always going to be hard though!

    If you are coming over as an NQT, you will have less hours on your timetable, and should be given a mentor within the school to help you, which is great in some schools, and not so great in others. Definitely a question you need to ask - what sort of support will I be given as an NQT. Marking is a big thing in some schools - asking what their marking policy is. Best thing would be to arrange a few days induction over in the school if you do get a position - it is a massive change coming out of Irish system and into the UK system. You'll have acronyms spilling out your ears! :)

    Some teachers specifically pick a bad school, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger kinda thing, and to be honest, in a lot of those schools, you will find the best staff teams, who back each other up. It also helps your behaviour management no end

    Science and maths are always sought after jobs - and the thing is that if you don't like a school, you can leave with notice, unlike at home where once you get into a school you hold onto that position for dear life. I know Engage do guaranteed pay scheme, where it is subbing and you are guaranteed a certain amount of work per week, or else they pay you a certain amount, so you are guaranteed income, unlike at home.

    For what its worth, I'd say go - its an hour flight back home. At least if you have a full time position here for a while, the experience, positive or negative will stand to you.

    The school I'm in is lovely, but I had a horrible experience in my first school. We're top 1% in the country for the value we add to the students from the time they come into secondary to the time they leave, and we've picked up numerous awards, yet we are in what would most certainly be classed as a disadvantaged area. Being organised at it helps, and yes the first year will be hard as you get used to the system, but in my opinion its better to have a crack at doing something full time here rather than trying to pick up hours here and there at home. I started in my current school on a three month PE supply contract through Engage September last year, headteacher liked how I taught, so asked me would I be happy to teach my other subject until the end of the year as the PE hours were no longer there, and I agreed. Permanent position in the maths department was advertised, and I interviewed for it and got it over a teacher who is a maths specialist. I've heard a lot of stories like this, teachers made permanent after a few months or a year, which is great job security.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ BobBobbins


    Gebgbegb wrote: »
    I've had to read that a few times. Is this right:

    Currently in ireland.
    Working in the (British) Primary System in Ireland.
    You graduated in the UK as a secondary teacher.
    You want to teach Primary back in the UK?

    Essentially the question is... can you teach in the UK with a UK secondary qualification (and 5yrs primary experience)?

    Nope.

    Currently in Spain
    Working in British primary system
    Graduated in Ireland
    Want to teach primary in UK, if I can support a family of three doing so.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,134 gubbie


    BobBobbins wrote: »
    Nope.

    Currently in Spain
    Working in British primary system
    Graduated in Ireland
    Want to teach primary in UK, if I can support a family of three doing so.

    Very rough guess but I'd say you'd be on low £20 a year after taxes. Outside of London, for a 2 bed you'd be looking at about £1000 a month, council tax £1200 a year, water charges £350/yr, gas and electricity £700. So roughly £14,500 for really basic costs.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ BobBobbins


    Thanks Gubbie

    I appreciate the info.

    Do you think it is doable,bearing in mind the info you have provided? I guess I am asking you to put yourself in my shoes and say what you would do.

    Thanks to any and all for any help


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,134 gubbie


    That is a budget you need to make! I don't have a kid so I couldn't even start to hazard a guess about how much they cost. And I don't know your situation out in Spain.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ BobBobbins


    Thank you Gubbie. You have been a lot of help to me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 429 ✭✭ Afroshack


    LeonDen wrote: »
    I know, so hard to know whats the right thing to do! I really can't see any subbing becoming available in the area I live but I've also heard some horror stories about teaching in england!

    If you pick your school carefully, its honestly not that bad! I came over for my nqt year two years ago and I'm still here. Its hectic, yes but so worthwhile.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,424 ✭✭✭ 2011abc


    The school I'm in is lovely, but I had a horrible experience in my first school. We're top 1% in the country for the value we add to the students from the time they come into secondary to the time they leave, and we've picked up numerous awards, yet we are in what would most certainly be classed as a disadvantaged area.

    Not having a go at you rebelgirl but it makes my skin crawl to think that ' they 'have a way of calculating the 'value added' to students .Is it is £'s Sterlng , IQ or % points? I wonder can they actuarily adjust for the smile of a kid who has had fun succeeding at an extra curricular activity instead of shooting up in some local abandoned building?

    Seriously?! Is that what it's come to ?Value added students ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 429 ✭✭ Afroshack


    2011abc wrote: »
    Not having a go at you rebelgirl but it makes my skin crawl to think that ' they 'have a way of calculating the 'value added' to students .Is it is £'s Sterlng , IQ or % points? I wonder can they actuarily adjust for the smile of a kid who has had fun succeeding at an extra curricular activity instead of shooting up in some local abandoned building?

    Seriously?! Is that what it's come to ?Value added students ?


    Shooting up in some abandoned building? Okay hyperbole aside, value added means the amount of sublevels a child progresses through. They leave primary school around a 4a and should have climbed to a 5c, 5b and then a 5a by their first year in secondary. It goes all the way to level 8a across the different subjects and students are expected to climb three sub levels. Value added simply tallies up the levels they have climbed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ BobBobbins


    Thanks Afroshack. Your words make sense and are helpful


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,424 ✭✭✭ 2011abc


    If this makes me the villain of this thread then so be it but Im sick and tired of people touting the English system as 'good experience' , looks great on CV etc ...Its patently not !Its a flippin' DISASTER and even THEY know it -and worst of all our 'education mandarins' continue to slavishly ape what they do even to the point of employing some of their 'experts'.'Academy' system is positively sinister (semi)privatisation of education .
    If teachers being tortured with mountains of paperwork to grade student achievement as 'a' , 'b' or 'c' so that the best they can aspire to call a social life is maybe catching a movie at their mid term breaks then call me unimpressed .Their obsession with getting the most students possible to a Grade C (while apparently being disinterested in A's or D's ) is also is weird .Advertising this on billboards outside the school is positively crass .
    Breaks my heart to see our young NQTs forced to choose between this and the shambles of deliberately being given 'fractions' of jobs here .

    If forced Id far sooner spend a year or two in UAE/Dubai etc


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  • Registered Users Posts: 429 ✭✭ Afroshack


    2011abc wrote: »
    If this makes me the villain of this thread then so be it but Im sick and tired of people touting the English system as 'good experience' , looks great on CV etc ...Its patently not !Its a flippin' DISASTER and even THEY know it -and worst of all our 'education mandarins' continue to slavishly ape what they do even to the point of employing some of their 'experts'.'Academy' system is positively sinister (semi)privatisation of education .
    If teachers being tortured with mountains of paperwork to grade student achievement as 'a' , 'b' or 'c' so that the best they can aspire to call a social life is maybe catching a movie at their mid term breaks then call me unimpressed .Their obsession with getting the most students possible to a Grade C (while apparently being disinterested in A's or D's ) is also is weird .Advertising this on billboards outside the school is positively crass .
    Breaks my heart to see our young NQTs forced to choose between this and the shambles of deliberately being given 'fractions' of jobs here .

    If forced Id far sooner spend a year or two in UAE/Dubai etc

    Of course its good experience. I have learned far, far more about AFL, behaviour management and differentiation in my two years here than in college. There are many faults with the system, yes but in fairness Ireland isn't exactly a beacon of hope judging by international standards. Also, since Ireland is copying the UK way, surely it makes sense to have actually gone to the UK and lived the system before? I really think you're exaggerating how awful the system is in the UK. Yes its way harder than the Irish one, but it makes you a really efficient and experienced teacher. I'm a far better and more skilled teacher for having come here.
    Lastly, the paperwork gets easier the longer you are here. I no longer have to work weekends or late evenings and I'm mentally much more secure than I was in my nqt year for sure.


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