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Recommended Books

2

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  • Here's an Aladdin's cave of free online books.




  • Fab resources guys...

    Appreciated...
    Thanks...

    CZ




  • Can someone recommend a good book for learning enough SQL/Oracle to be able to write stored procedures and functions and decipher what other people have written?




  • Can someone recommend a good book for learning enough SQL/Oracle to be able to write stored procedures and functions and decipher what other people have written?

    From Scratch ?

    http://headfirstlabs.com/books/hfsql/

    Id also recommend

    "Learning SQL"

    and

    "SQL In a nutshell, 2nd Edition"




  • Korvanica wrote: »
    From Scratch ?

    http://headfirstlabs.com/books/hfsql/

    Id also recommend

    "Learning SQL"

    and

    "SQL In a nutshell, 2nd Edition"

    Would the fact that I'd be using Oracle have any impact on the functions and procedures that I'd be writing or is that purely a function of the language (SQL)?


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  • I can't recommend this book highly enough. http://www.amazon.com/Primer-Plus-Edition-Developers-Library/dp/0321776402

    It is essential if you wish to be a C++ coder.




  • Clean Code
    Effective C++ & More Effective C++
    Mine choice would be Effective STL
    If you plan to use the C++ Standard Template Library, seriously, read this book… or at least browse it a bit! It contains lot’s of useful information, and it will certainly help you to understand how the STL really works behind scenes.




  • Growing Object-Orientated Software, Guided By Tests: Steve Freeman and Nat Pryce

    This is a book on Test Driven Development in Java. Its very easy to read and explains everything well.




  • Thinking of trying to learn code, complete noob, can anyone recommend me a good book to get me started?


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  • Thinking of trying to learn code, complete noob, can anyone recommend me a good book to get me started?

    I'll sound like a broken record saying this but the head first books are great for learning a new language.




  • Korvanica wrote: »
    I'll sound like a broken record saying this but the head first books are great for learning a new language.

    Any particular head first book or language which I should look at first?




  • Can anyone point me in the direction of a book or online series of tutorials that would help me get up to speed with creating a Chrome packaged app?

    In addition any books that do a good job of covering HTML5 and Javascript with a view to creating a single page style application?




  • Anyone recommend any good books/resources for Ruby on Rails, I've followed online tutorials and have the basics as in I can build a dynamic website with CRUD operations but looking at the best path to advance from here.




  • Going through Cracking the Coding Interview at the mo, and couldn't recommend it enough




  • Can anyone recommend a book for beginners? HTML, CSS, JS, Jquery, PHP and MySQL




  • @Atomic: Check out Rails 3 Tutorial by Michael Hartl. You can find the previous edition online for free. The book guides you through the building of a Twitter clone, and although it is lacking in detail in some areas, I enjoyed it quite a lot.

    @Omega: I don't think you'll find a single book to cover all of that. The closest you'll find are PHP + MySQL books. HTML, CSS, JavaScript and Jquery are all front-end technologies, so you'd likely be looking at getting a front-end book and back-end book. Probably another again to do with design as well (CSS/HTML). I would personally just look online for tutorials and examples.

    On topic: As has been mentioned before Headfirst Java is meant to be amazing, and still relevant today despite being quite old. The author actually researched the most effective learning techniques, so the book is filled with jokes and diagrams. It might not be to your tastes, but I'm going to give it a try as I'm a bit rusty on Java.




  • UML Distilled by Martin Fowler.

    It talks about UML in the context of a communication tool rather than in the context of a tool to model every detail of a system. It deals with a subset of UML which can be used to capture and express knowledge about software systems very effectively.

    (I can't post links because I am new.)


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  • UML Distilled by Martin Fowler.

    It talks about UML in the context of a communication tool rather than in the context of a tool to model every detail of a system. It deals with a subset of UML which can be used to capture and express knowledge about software systems very effectively.

    (I can't post links because I am new.)


    All his books can be found here.

    I link to them all, because I've heard that pretty much anything he's written is gold.




  • Can anyone recommend a good book for learning SQL?




  • Hi,

    Anyone got a recommendation for beginner/intermediate level Java - looking to have upto Java 8 covered. I was looking at Effective Java, but it only goes up to Jave SE 6.

    I'm also looking for a book which is focused on programming methodology - i.e. how to design a program in terms of its architecture and how to break down a problem into its solution. Suggestions greatly welcome.

    Thanks.




  • Hi,

    Anyone got a recommendation for beginner/intermediate level Java - looking to have upto Java 8 covered. I was looking at Effective Java, but it only goes up to Jave SE 6.

    I'm also looking for a book which is focused on programming methodology - i.e. how to design a program in terms of its architecture and how to break down a problem into its solution. Suggestions greatly welcome.

    Thanks.
    Java 6 is plenty to be getting started with tbh




  • Java 6 is plenty to be getting started with tbh

    So, I should be okay with Effective Java still? Even though I'm going into a job using 7 and soon going to 8?

    Thanks for the reply :)




  • If you are looking to cover the basics, then 6 will do fine. You might want to look at something else for the the advanced stuff




  • Sparks wrote: »
    My shortlist:


    I would have added a few from your list. The first two for sure and TAOCP of course.


    I'd also add a few of the Richard Steven's books to the list. The network programming ones and APUE. Just don't see that there are two editions of his networking book(s) and assume that the first one would not be worth buying. It's actually a nicer book. If you had to buy either first or second editions, I'd say go with first one. Some of the stuff in the second one is actually a bit superfluous and outdated, while the first edition has good general fundamentals




  • UML Distilled by Martin Fowler.

    It talks about UML in the context of a communication tool rather than in the context of a tool to model every detail of a system. It deals with a subset of UML which can be used to capture and express knowledge about software systems very effectively.

    (I can't post links because I am new.)

    I love his book on refactoring. A really useful read for anyone working with legacy code, which is most of us at one time or another,




  • Can anyone recommend a design patterns book - I'll be programming in Python.


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  • Got a book there a few weeks ago:
    No Bullshit guide to Maths & Phyics by Ivan Savov.

    Great book for brushing up on maths and just having as a reference.


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