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The Therizinosaur Thread

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  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Gotta love therizinosaurs, big friggin' sloth bear monsters! :D


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 9,347 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Manach


    Galvasean wrote: »
    big friggin' sloth bear monsters!
    That should be name of the latest summer-block buster movie :)


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor




  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0043911

    From the same formation as Falcarius but seemingly from a later time.
    journal.pone.0043911.g004&representation=PNG_I


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    greenriverensis, really???????????


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Of smell, hearing and balance at least. (Is balance a sense? I don´t care)

    http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112752520/ct-brain-study-therizinosaurs-black-sheep-dinosaur-122012/

    beipiaosaurus_inexpectatus.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Balance is definitely a sense. The whole '5 senses' idea has never really been held up in scientific circles, despite being one of those things people 'know'.

    Side note: THIS is the best image they could come up with for therizinosaurs :rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    apparently (and according to QI) balance is one of about 11 senses we have, some creatures have a few more.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 87,129 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Capt'n Midnight


    Rubecula wrote: »
    some creatures have a few more.
    Look at the vision of the mantis shrimp

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantis_shrimp#Eyes


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Look at the vision of the mantis shrimp

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantis_shrimp#Eyes

    Not to mention sharks...


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    Not to mention sharks...

    I was thinking of sharks and rays when I actually said that. But even pidgeons have a sort of magnetic sense (and so do cattle it seems)

    Who knows what senses the more advanced dinosaurs may have had?


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Spider-sense!


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    Galvasean wrote: »
    Spider-sense!

    I dunno about anyone else but seeing a dromeosaur walking across the ceiling looking for a meal would freak me right out.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 87,129 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Capt'n Midnight


    Elephants can hear lower frequencies than we can. We can't hear mice sing because it's too high pitched.

    So perhaps the sauropods would use very low frequency since they have chests big enough.

    We still aren't sure that humans don't have functionality from this
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vomeronasal_organ


    certainly a larger nose would help

    some snakes can track body heat and the tuatara has that third eye


    It's amazing how often we've designed new sensors and then found that they pre existed in nature - the fixed focus of trilobites eyes and the fractal antenna of moths


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Elephants can hear lower frequencies than we can. We can't hear mice sing because it's too high pitched.

    So perhaps the sauropods would use very low frequency since they have chests big enough.

    Actually, the inner ear of Tyrannosaurus rex seems adapted to perceive infrasounds like those produced by elephants, which may suggest that:
    a) T. rex could produce and communicate with infrasounds
    b) T. rex's prey- such as large hadrosaurs or ceratopsians- could produce and communicate with infrasounds, and T. rex found it very convenient as it could detect them from great distances
    or c) both of the above.

    I've read that T-Rex had a similar adipose tissue thing on its feet that allowed it to walk silently despite its great size- again, just like elephants. I am not sure how exactly this elephant sense works but, they are known to perceive the infrasounds produced by other elephants- and earthquakes- via their feet, so maybe T. rex could do the same?

    And truth is, many large animals use infrasounds, from giraffes and rhinos to tigers, crocodiles and cetaceans, and perhaps more interestingly, cassowaries (which have the deepest call of any bird and seemingly use their helmet/crest to either amplify or perceive infrasounds (Parasaurolophus, Cortyhosaurus and friends, anyone?).


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor




  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Interesting creature. Apart from the teeth it's very 'classic theropod' looking.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    As proven by tracks of both found together.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-30110-8

    Very interesting considering that these tracks are from about 69 million years ago, a time from which no therizinosaur fossils are known from North America. Now it is only a matter of time before they are found. Who knows! There's a chance T. rex itself may have coexisted with something similar to Therizinosaurus at the very end of the Cretaceous (Therizinosaurus and Tarbosaurus (Tyrannosaurus bataar?) in the picture)

    tarbosaurus_vs_therizinosaurus_by_willdynamo55-db0yn5r.jpg


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Inside the head of Nothronychus:

    Nothronychus was a therizinosaur, not unlike the later, Asian Therizinosaurus, but somewhat smaller. This study takes an in depth look at its skull, braincase, etc. Among other things, it would appear (unsurprisingly) that Nothronychus was capable of hearing (and most likely producing) infrasounds.

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0198155

    latest?cb=20121228040021


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor




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