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Tiny polar dinosaur footprints found

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 Galvasean


    Awww, like an itty bitty lil' dino family :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    Dino chicken.

    Frozen Dino Chicken.

    Had sage and onion been invented by then?:D

    This is the sort of news that really got my interest. I am fascinated by creatures living in the polar regions. It shows just how diverse life was back then, and it isn't just a 'modern' phenomenon.

    (I wonder if we will ever see evidence of a dino penguin?)


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 Galvasean


    Rubecula wrote: »

    (I wonder if we will ever see evidence of a dino penguin?)

    All penguins are dinosaurs [/pedantic]

    Sure, there was that 5 foot tall penguin from prehistoric times:
    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?p=68300573

    But if you want one from the mesozoic the closest you're likely to find is this ugly mug:
    hesperornis4.jpg&sa=X&ei=H3BFTsnsFsuDhQfg14GbBg&ved=0CAQQ8wc&usg=AFQjCNEC5QygAFmjmTMLIBM3N91R7zYvcw
    Hesperornsis
    hesperornis1.jpg&sa=X&ei=PXBFTtPZFMy7hAfcxunBBg&ved=0CAQQ8wc&usg=AFQjCNEvn9Y6MSyLY5-7NOIi1c3OP4biYg


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Galvasean wrote: »
    All penguins are dinosaurs [/pedantic]

    Sure, there was that 5 foot tall penguin from prehistoric times:
    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?p=68300573

    But if you want one from the mesozoic the closest you're likely to find is this ugly mug:
    hesperornis4.jpg&sa=X&ei=H3BFTsnsFsuDhQfg14GbBg&ved=0CAQQ8wc&usg=AFQjCNEC5QygAFmjmTMLIBM3N91R7zYvcw
    Hesperornsis
    hesperornis1.jpg&sa=X&ei=PXBFTtPZFMy7hAfcxunBBg&ved=0CAQQ8wc&usg=AFQjCNEvn9Y6MSyLY5-7NOIi1c3OP4biYg

    Which Primeval made even "uglier" by stripping it featherless...


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    I assume one of the Plesiosaurs would be the equivalent of a Leapard seal in that case.

    Does anyone know if any of the marine reptiles frequented polar regions?


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Rubecula wrote: »
    I assume one of the Plesiosaurs would be the equivalent of a Leapard seal in that case.

    Does anyone know if any of the marine reptiles frequented polar regions?

    Yes they did; three-crested Umoonasaurus and needle-toothed Opallionectes from the early Cretaceous both lived in polar waters in what is today Australia. They were discovered before it was confirmed that plesiosaurs were warm blooded, so there was already much talk about that possibility since then.
    Kronosaurus is another example, hence my drawing of a hungry Krono coming out of a breathing hole in the ice to grab some dinner :D

    kronosaurus_is_hungry_by_hodarinundu-d3fds4t.jpg

    Ichthyosaur Platypterygius also lived in polar waters.

    BaitBall_Bob-Nicholls_1-7-2009_resized.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    That drawing is awsome. It is a Kronosaur?

    Don't suppose you could do a comparison sketch on what a Kronosaur and a Liopleuridon looked like could you? They do seem to be remarkably similar (what we think they looked like anyway.) And you know my fascination of all things marine reptile orientated.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Rubecula wrote: »
    That drawing is awsome. It is a Kronosaur?

    Don't suppose you could do a comparison sketch on what a Kronosaur and a Liopleuridon looked like could you? They do seem to be remarkably similar (what we think they looked like anyway.) And you know my fascination of all things marine reptile orientated.

    Yeah its a Kronosaurus. :D And yes, I guess I could, although it seems that none of them is known by complete remains. Some of the remains previously assigned to Liopleurodon ended up being a completely new creature, so...


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    Yeah its a Kronosaurus. :D And yes, I guess I could, although it seems that none of them is known by complete remains. Some of the remains previously assigned to Liopleurodon ended up being a completely new creature, so...

    Ah yes thats true. Well nevermind then. I do sometimes get carried away. Sorry:o


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