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Why Delayed Cord Clamping is so important for your baby

  • 18-02-2011 4:32pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 230 ✭✭ SanFran07


    But is not standard practice in Ireland.

    This is a really important video for all Mums and Dads to see and discuss with their caregivers.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cX-zD8jKne0


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,893 Hannibal Smith


    I always thought it was a given that they don't clamp the umbilicol cord until after it stopped pulsating :confused: That's what they told us in the Ante-Natal Classes in Holles Street.


  • Registered Users Posts: 230 ✭✭ SanFran07


    In most units you have to specifically request it - standard practice is to clamp the cord immediately and cut soon after. Even leaving the cord to pulsate for 60 seconds has significant benefits for your baby.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 53 ✭✭✭ mum2be


    Very interesting, I'm definitely going to insist that they leave it and not clamp it immediately.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10 ✭✭✭ goodgirl7279


    wow that is so interesting. you have to wonder about all the things that are just routinely done in all aspects of medicine and health that may not be to our benefit at all!


  • Registered Users Posts: 389 ✭✭ Realtine


    That's very interesting,
    on a different note, I remember when my daughter was born 14 years ago, the midwife took a piece of the cord and put it in a jar and labeled it, I asked at the time why? but just got a mumbled response and and a patronizing pat on the arm like "oh don't you go worrying about that now" I still wonder occasionally why it was done.....
    anyway sorry a bit off topic, this thread just reminded me of that.


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  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 60,551 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    Realtine wrote: »
    That's very interesting,
    on a different note, I remember when my daughter was born 14 years ago, the midwife took a piece of the cord and put it in a jar and labeled it, I asked at the time why? but just got a mumbled response and and a patronizing pat on the arm like "oh don't you go worrying about that now" I still wonder occasionally why it was done.....
    anyway sorry a bit off topic, this thread just reminded me of that.

    What hospital was it? Cord blood is rather valuable for stem cell research, but they shouldn't be appropriating it like that...


  • Registered Users Posts: 230 ✭✭ SanFran07


    MYOB wrote: »
    What hospital was it? Cord blood is rather valuable for stem cell research, but they shouldn't be appropriating it like that...

    Just like the organ retention scandal....nobody thought to ask the parents...

    http://www.irishhealth.com/article.html?id=15869


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,331 How Strange


    I asked in the coombe for it to be allowed to stop pulsating before cutting it. The midwife even put my hand on it so I could feel the pulsating stop before she cut it.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators Posts: 17,231 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Das Kitty


    It is standard practise in UCHG for uncomplicated vaginal birth. I asked when I was there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,196 crazy cat lady


    At every birth when they examine the placenta they take a bit of placenta, a bit of cord and a bit of the membranes. I think if there is any problems later on they have a bit of everything for examination.

    They will take the whole 'afterbirth' for examination after some births, such as premamture labour etc...


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 23,866 ✭✭✭✭ January


    At every birth when they examine the placenta they take a bit of placenta, a bit of cord and a bit of the membranes. I think if there is any problems later on they have a bit of everything for examination.

    They will take the whole 'afterbirth' for examination after some births, such as premamture labour etc...

    They took my placenta for examination, I only found out when I requested my notes and it detailed that their were two white lesions on my placenta and they had sent it for testing...


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,623 ✭✭✭ wmpdd3


    mind if i ask why you requested you notes and how do you do it?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 23,866 ✭✭✭✭ January


    You send a letter to your hospitals Freedom of Information Officer (check hospital website) stating, date of birth of child, your hospital number if you have it, full name and address.

    Make sure you specifically mention the FOI act (not sure what years) and send a copy of your identification too.

    I got mine a few weeks after I applied in the post.

    I requested them because I was pregnant on number 2 and was attending a different hospital and assumed they'd want to see them, they never asked though!


  • Registered Users Posts: 230 ✭✭ SanFran07


    At every birth when they examine the placenta they take a bit of placenta, a bit of cord and a bit of the membranes. I think if there is any problems later on they have a bit of everything for examination.
    etc...

    Not in all hospitals.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,858 Bigcheeze


    wmpdd3 wrote: »
    mind if i ask why you requested you notes and how do you do it?

    Also your notes are with you the whole time you're in hospital. If you have another baby the notes from your previous pregnancies are in the file and you're free to read them. You might need somebody with some medical experience to interpret the abbreviations used.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,128 cynder


    MY first child placenta was sent for testing as it was hugh, the other one was a premature labour and the placenta was ragged no idea what happened to the 3rd.

    As for leaving the cord pulsating, it was always clamp and cut.

    Cord was around all of thier necks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 230 ✭✭ SanFran07



    As for leaving the cord pulsating, it was always clamp and cut.

    Cord was around all of thier necks.


    Cords around the neck is very common and quite normal (around 1/3 of all babies experience this). During birth your baby is getting all of it's oxygen through the cord - not through it's mouth/nose so the cord isn't 'choking' the baby as is a common misconception. Best practice these days is not to touch the cord as baby's head is born...and to clamp a cord that is around a baby's neck could be considered risky especially if the shoulders haven't been born yet.


  • Registered Users Posts: 256 ✭✭ Springfields


    Hiya does anyone know / has anyone requested that they can keep the placenta after delivery (providing all is normal and they dont need to send off for testing) ? is this offered / allowed in Irish hospitals? thanks


  • Registered Users Posts: 230 ✭✭ SanFran07


    It's generally not 'offered' as such but you can take it home if you wish. You'll just need to let the staff know on the day. Double ziplock bag it - make sure you label it and then put it in the freezer until you decide what you're doing with it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,331 How Strange


    We were told by a coombe midwife during our antenatal class that if you want it you have to notify the hospital weeks in advance in writing as it's considered biological material. Also if you want to bury it even in your back garden you have to notify your local authority and comply to specific guidelines for depth of burial


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,893 Hannibal Smith


    We were told by a coombe midwife during our antenatal class that if you want it you have to notify the hospital weeks in advance in writing as it's considered biological material. Also if you want to bury it even in your back garden you have to notify your local authority and comply to specific guidelines for depth of burial

    Really? That's very interesting. I'd never have thought of it in that way, but I suppose it makes sense.


  • Registered Users Posts: 34 ✭✭✭ weirdcatlady


    Hi Guys,

    Has anyone given birth recently and requested this? Was there any issues?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,517 ✭✭✭ bee06


    Hi Guys,

    Has anyone given birth recently and requested this? Was there any issues?

    I had my 2nd baby last March and the midwife asked me whether I wanted to do it or not. I said yes. This was in CUMH on the domino scheme.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,091 ✭✭✭ catrionanic


    Hi Guys,

    Has anyone given birth recently and requested this? Was there any issues?

    It is standard practice in Holles St.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,510 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    Standard practice in the Rotunda.


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