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Eircom accually calling NGB 'fiber powered'

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 865 clearz


    Hey All,

    Just spotted this on Eircoms site. Its not enough that their television ad campain for their so called next generation broadband shows a picture of ireland with beams of light travelling all over it as if to say its powered by light (fiber) but now they are calling it 'fiber powered' on their website. Pic Below.
    All internet can be called 'fiber powered' if your talking about the backbone but this is blatent misinformation.
    eircom.png


Comments



  • clearz wrote: »

    Its not enough that their television ad campain for their so called next generation broadband shows a picture of ireland with beams of light travelling all over it as if to say its powered by light (fiber) but now they are calling it 'fiber powered' on their website. Pic Below.
    All internet can be called 'fiber powered' if your talking about the backbone but this is blatent misinformation.

    Sure is misinformation...but it's no worse than UPC calling theirs "fibre powered" too, although they have a better claim to it than eircom.

    With no decent Advertising standards authority here telcos can make the wildest claims and nobody can "correct" them a bit like the "unlimited" scam they are pulling.

    It's just some rubbish dreamed up by the marketing deptartment




  • well, by that rationale, they could be calling dialup and gprs 'fibre powered' too. if you look far enough back, it's all fibre powered. :)




  • Actually, some eircom exchanges are Microwave link and some fibre.
    But that's irrelevent. What's more important is if it's prehistoric ATM 120Mbps approx or even ISDN Pri 2.048Mbps running on the fibre or 1Gbps or 10Gbps IP based instead of TDM based transport.

    It's also laughable to call 8Mbps peak (7.6Mbps peak to user) typically 3Mbps original ASDL, NGB (Next Generation Broadband). Even the ADSL2+ (24Mbps peak, typical 6Mbps to 10Mbps) is last Generation, or even the one before that.
    VDSL is the successor to ADSL2+ It's basically LAST generation!
    VDSL is deployed over existing wiring used for POTS and lower-speed DSL connections. This standard was approved by ITU in November 2001.

    Second-generation systems (VDSL2; ITU-T G.993.2 approved in February 2006) utilize bandwidth of up to 30 MHz to provide data rates exceeding 100 Mbit/s simultaneously in both the upstream and downstream directions. The maximum available bit rate is achieved at a range of about 300 meters; performance degrades as the loop attenuation increases.

    Next Generation is Fibre to Home.
    "Current Generation" is Fibre to Cabinet less than 300m from house and VDSL2 or HFC (Hybrid Fibre Cable), i.e. UPC fibre driven Coax with DOCSIS3 and 30Mbps to 125Mbps.

    Fibre to Home has existed nearly five years. It's now as cheap as ADSL if installing new infrastructure from scratch. To give it to everyone as retrofit is €1B to €2B. It's claimed it will cost €70B to close Anglo Irish.

    Generations since 1840s Dates approximate.
    1. Fibre to Home <--- Actual NGB 2005 .. http://www.lightwaveonline.com/about-us/lightwave-issue-archives/issue/flexibility-is-key-to-successful-fiber-to-the-premises-deployments-53914857.html
    2. Fibre to Cabinet/Kerb, HFC, Cable DOCSIS3 2006
    3. VDSL2 2006
    4. ADSL2+ 2004
    5. VDSL, Cable DOCSIS 2 (more than 8 years ago!) 2001 ..2002
    6. ADSL2 2002
    7. ADSL <-- Advertised as NGB approx 1998 .. 2001
    8. hybrid Analogue 56K systems 1998 (needs ISDN exchange!)
    9. ISDN 1988 approx
    10. Analogue Dialup up to 28k (33k is compression) 1980s
    11. Analogue FSK dialup (300 baud to 1200 baud) 1960s
    12. Telex, Teleprinters 75 baud 1935
    13. Telegraph about 30wpm max, approximately 10bps! 1840s




  • I have had a lot of trouble with my broadband since it was upgraded in July. It keeps timing out and losing connection. I have had no satisfaction with the supplier (Vodafone), who sells on from Eircom. Previously I had BT broadband with no problems for years.

    This latest 'upgrade' is a retorgrade step. It would appear to me that the broadband is being choked off after the exchange, with a limited connection to the rest of the internet. I can get 7mbs speed, but at the same time get poor screen refresh and slow loading.


    By the way, back in the 80's the Irish Telex system was 50 baud - 7.5 cps at 7 bits per character. The USA system was 110 baud - 10 cps using 11 bits per character, 7 bits for code (ASCII) plus 1 for parity, and 1 start bit and 2 stop bits.




  • Will ESB start advertising their new copper or aluminum powered electricity?


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  • Paparazzo wrote: »
    Will ESB start advertising their new copper or aluminum powered electricity?

    Motorway powered boreens...




  • Paparazzo wrote: »
    Will ESB start advertising their new copper or aluminum powered electricity?

    Well, they could call them powered by hot air, as they do use wind energy which is hot air.

    But the politicos have cornered the market in hot air, and they power nothing!




  • How can they claim zero contention?




  • I have had a lot of trouble with my broadband since it was upgraded in July. It keeps timing out and losing connection. I have had no satisfaction with the supplier (Vodafone), who sells on from Eircom. Previously I had BT broadband with no problems for years.

    I have been having the same problems, signed up to BT Ireland last year (being from the north i went with a name i trusted) and had great service, but once it switched to vodafone i have been having no end of problems, from them sending me a crappy router which they replaced like for like even though i was told i would get a different brand, to the connection cutting off every few hours.

    Got so bad last week, i came home, connected to eve online and the connection dropped straight away, was down for 2 hours, which i spent on the phone being treated like a child. Needless to say that im now sitting in waiting on UPC coming out today to install my new service from them.




  • innovated wrote: »
    Needless to say that im now sitting in waiting on UPC coming out today to install my new service from them.

    This is the only way eircom will learn is when all their urban customers have voted with their wallets and moved to an alternative supplier.

    Hopefully UPC works out well for you.


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