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Where did "Happy out" come from??!

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 11,331 ✭✭✭✭ bronte


    God I hate that phrase! :mad:


  • Registered Users Posts: 275 ✭✭ SomeDude


    Satus update: Jeez 61 replies! I'm happy out with that :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,239 KittyeeTrix


    Xavi6 wrote: »
    It's a horrible expression that I've only heard used by culchies, and it's usually followed by the word "like".

    /shudder

    Guess I'm a culchie then who uses a "horrible " expression such as "Happy out"

    Here was me thinking I was just a happy kinda person enjoying life who sometimes uses the phrase "happy out" to express how delighted they are in particular situations.........


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,239 KittyeeTrix


    Absolutely happy out that not everybody is so against the use of the phrase!!!!!!
    I don't feel quite so incompetent now for my obvious abuse of the English language:)

    Each to their own I say, no, that's probably not correct either- how about- whatever floats your boat?????
    No, that most likely won't be acceptable either.......

    Aw, to hell with it.......I give up:D

    I also use the terms-
    sound out
    Alright missus
    Nice wan
    loveen
    feen
    shades
    corbed
    etc


    Dear god...................I'm a culchie:eek::rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,152 ✭✭✭✭ Malari


    Absolutely happy out that not everybody is so against the use of the phrase!!!!!!
    I don't feel quite so incompetent now for my obvious abuse of the English language:)

    Each to their own I say, no, that's probably not correct either- how about- whatever floats your boat?????
    No, that most likely won't be acceptable either.......

    Aw, to hell with it.......I give up:D

    I also use the terms-
    sound out
    Alright missus
    Nice wan
    loveen
    feen
    shades
    corbed
    etc


    Dear god...................I'm a culchie:eek::rolleyes:

    What's "corbed"?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 275 ✭✭ SomeDude


    Well we've had some interesting suggestions as to the origins of "happy out". The general view appears to be that it literally means you are happy throughout yourself. It still seems like an odd phrase to me. And the fact that most people on here don't know it's literally meaning only reinforces that view. I'm happy not using it!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,331 ✭✭✭ kingtut


    I have only heard it being said in Cork and everytime I hear it it still makes me cringe! :eek:


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,239 KittyeeTrix


    Malari wrote: »
    What's "corbed"?

    We used it in Galway to mean caught, as in when we were sneaking in from a night out we were "corbed" by our parents!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,239 KittyeeTrix


    SomeDude wrote: »
    Well we've had some interesting suggestions as to the origins of "happy out". The general view appears to be that it literally means you are happy throughout yourself. It still seems like an odd phrase to me. And the fact that most people on here don't know it's literally meaning only reinforces that view. I'm happy not using it!!

    The fact that most people don't use it makes me even happier out that I do use it!!!!!!
    Funnily enough, I used it twice this week over in the Soccer forum and I hadn't used it beforehand here on boards ever.
    This was to signify my utter delight that Tevez scored 3 goals for Man City and I got a shedload of points on my Fantasy prem team.....

    Actually now that I think of it, I must express my delight more often using this phrase!;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,442 MickShamrock


    I have never heard either of these phrases.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,410 ✭✭✭ Bonito


    Ricky Martin's happy out
    I believe it is from orgasm. You are letting out and you are happy. Therefore, the creation of happy out. :cool:


  • Registered Users Posts: 111 ✭✭ Stevokenevo


    I always understood 'Happy Out' and 'Busy Out', etc. to be a short version of Happy or Busy 'out the door'

    e.g. Busy out (the door) - I'm so busy that there's no room left and I'm almost being forced out the door - there is so much 'busy' that it's taking up all the room.

    e.g. Happy Out (the door) - There's so much happiness it's taking up all the space, etc.

    I've honestly always believed this - not sure where I heard it though!


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,493 Fulton Crown


    I have never heard either of these phrases.

    Whats the weather like in Pluto ?

    Any heavy showers of cosmic dust like ?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 37,215 ✭✭✭✭ Dudess


    Culchies.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,493 Fulton Crown


    I always understood 'Happy Out' and 'Busy Out', etc. to be a short version of Happy or Busy 'out the door'

    e.g. Busy out (the door) - I'm so busy that there's no room left and I'm almost being forced out the door - there is so much 'busy' that it's taking up all the room.

    e.g. Happy Out (the door) - There's so much happiness it's taking up all the space, etc.

    I've honestly always believed this - not sure where I heard it though!

    Think of the phrase "Tired Out" - completely tired - Yes.

    Think of the phrase "Cleaned out" - completely cleaned...Right ?

    Then "Happy Out" means completely happy..as in "I'M soooo happy there is just nooooo room for any more happyness...noooooo not even a teeensie teeeensie weensie bit ......

    I am sooooo full of happyness that i could neeeeerly burst ...buuuurstin wit happynesss - gaiety - laughter ..jumpin an skippin an all that.....

    Uh uh ..ahem ..I uh think that's what it means ::(


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,639 Miss Lockhart


    I've only ever heard it said by friends from Limerick. I always associated it with the phrase "peace out", not that I have any idea where that came from either.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 18,161 Karsini


    Never heard it until I was in Kerry.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 399 ✭✭ barakus


    Noopti wrote: »
    "Go on"??

    Never heard that before....

    Only in Cork


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 623 Pete4779


    SomeDude wrote: »
    I hear a lot of people using the phrase "happy out", or "busy out".

    Does anyone know the origin of these expressions :confused: I cringe everytime I hear someone use them.

    I'm no professor of English, but me do be thinking it is no proper English.....

    I always figured it to be a sort of derivative of a germanic type of expression, as in a separable verb.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 11,001 ✭✭✭✭ opinion guy


    Yeah culchie thing all right - first heard it down Limerick way -snip-
    I've only ever heard it said by friends from Limerick. I always associated it with the phrase "peace out", not that I have any idea where that came from either.

    Agreed with the Limerick suggestion. My mate that moved to Limerick around 1995 started using it shortly thereafter. Thats about when I first heard it. Do i win ?
    trad wrote: »
    How did "Hey" make it from Ardee to CSI?

    Huh ?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 92 ✭✭✭ BrokenHeels_Ox


    ive NEVER heard happy out

    Ive heard bad out...
    "she has a face like a bulldog eating nettles"
    "Ahh, thats bad out"

    kinda ridiculous when you type it out, but its an automatic thing with me lol


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,475 ✭✭✭ larchielads


    us waterford people use the phrase "happy out" the whole time and "happy days" as well.
    we also use "go on" when we're sayin goodbye to someone usually after meetin them in the street and sharin a small joke too i find.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,419 WanderingSoul


    I've never actually hear someone say "happy out", "tired out" or "cleaned out".


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,088 NoDice


    We used it in Galway to mean caught, as in when we were sneaking in from a night out we were "corbed" by our parents!!!

    Ha ha "NABBED BEY"!! :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,528 ✭✭✭ maninasia


    Think of the phrase "Tired Out" - completely tired - Yes.

    Think of the phrase "Cleaned out" - completely cleaned...Right ?

    Then "Happy Out" means completely happy..as in "I'M soooo happy there is just nooooo room for any more happyness...noooooo not even a teeensie teeeensie weensie bit ......

    I am sooooo full of happyness that i could neeeeerly burst ...buuuurstin wit happynesss - gaiety - laughter ..jumpin an skippin an all that.....

    Uh uh ..ahem ..I uh think that's what it means ::(

    I don't visit Ireland very often but when I do I always notice the changes that people who live there all the time might not pick up on.

    These phrases 'happy out' and 'happy days' are running rampant, infecting most of my friends and family.

    First time I heard it I was..'happy out'...'happy....out'...WTF you talking 'bout! Happy out of what me man?

    It drives me bananas I must say, but I just grin and bear it.

    Some of these phrases came from Irish into English, however this one might be like the poster said above, from 'tired out' and somebody took to changing it to the positive 'happy out', it has the feeling of corporate trainer wankspeak about it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,484 ✭✭✭✭ DEFTLEFTHAND


    Only shady gimps and career dole jockeys use the phrase.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12,078 ✭✭✭✭ LordSutch


    I have never heard of "happy out", or "busy out", well not in Dublin/South Dublin :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,642 ✭✭✭ Balmed Out


    I've always heard happy out or tired out, normally in relation to a child, baby or pet.
    ie. if minding someone's kid and they asked how they were you could say they were no trouble and happy out to be helping with the housework all morning.

    I've never heard anyone say I'm bla out. Busy out is new to me too.


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