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An over supply of Primary Teachers - Irish Times Report

  • #2
    Registered Users Posts: 1,342 ✭✭✭ tonycascarino


    ''Falling pupil enrolments and high numbers of teaching graduates could lead to an oversupply of primary school teachers by 2029.

    According to The Irish Times, there will be 13,000 more teachers than will be required to meet demand, with a technical report by the Department of Education stating pupil numbers in primary schools are likely to fall significantly between now and 2036.

    The number of pupils at primary level is expected to decrease by more than 130,000 over the next 15 years, meaning the 13,000 teacher surplus will increase to 17,000 nine years later.

    The extra teachers may lead to a decrease in class sizes, which has repeatedly been called for due to the State's primary level class sizes being among the highest in Europe.

    The Government has already said the pupil-teacher ratio for primary schools will fall to its lowest level ever recorded in the next academic year when it reduces to 25 students per teacher.

    Primary teachers could also be retrained as second level teachers, where pupil numbers are expected to increase by more than 30,000 up to 2024, before falling by 75,000 to 2036.

    The same report states there will also be an oversupply of second level teachers due to this later fall in pupil enrolments, but the number of extra teachers for secondary schools will be significantly lower.''


    https://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/large-volume-of-graduates-could-lead-to-oversupply-of-primary-teachers-report-1136624.html


Comments

  • #2


    ''high numbers of teaching graduates''

    This is an area that could be looked at in order to solve the problem. Don't train more primary school teachers than are needed.


  • #2


    Lillyfae wrote: »
    This is an area that could be looked at in order to solve the problem. Don't train more primary school teachers than are needed.

    Far better to reduce class sizes.


  • #2


    crossman47 wrote: »
    Far better to reduce class sizes.

    To what level? Would you wait until the ratio is 1:10? Or 1:5?


  • #2


    reducing class sizes will require more class rooms....


  • #2


    ax530 wrote: »
    reducing class sizes will require more class rooms....

    Start building up - most schools in the country are on 1 floor with very high ceilings.
    A horrific waste of space


  • #2


    ''Falling pupil enrolments and high numbers of teaching graduates could lead to an oversupply of primary school teachers by 2029.

    According to The Irish Times, there will be 13,000 more teachers than will be required to meet demand, with a technical report by the Department of Education stating pupil numbers in primary schools are likely to fall significantly between now and 2036.

    The number of pupils at primary level is expected to decrease by more than 130,000 over the next 15 years, meaning the 13,000 teacher surplus will increase to 17,000 nine years later.

    The extra teachers may lead to a decrease in class sizes, which has repeatedly been called for due to the State's primary level class sizes being among the highest in Europe.

    The Government has already said the pupil-teacher ratio for primary schools will fall to its lowest level ever recorded in the next academic year when it reduces to 25 students per teacher.

    Primary teachers could also be retrained as second level teachers, where pupil numbers are expected to increase by more than 30,000 up to 2024, before falling by 75,000 to 2036.

    The same report states there will also be an oversupply of second level teachers due to this later fall in pupil enrolments, but the number of extra teachers for secondary schools will be significantly lower.''


    https://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/large-volume-of-graduates-could-lead-to-oversupply-of-primary-teachers-report-1136624.html

    This isn't new news, students are advised of the population trajectory when they start.

    If the numbers of teachers being trained in state colleges are capped, but the private colleges can go from one to two intakes per year with the same number of students in each intake as an undergraduate intake in a state college, then it's unsurprising that the saturation point is being exceeded.


  • #2


    Blush_01 wrote: »
    This isn't new news, students are advised of the population trajectory when they start.

    If the numbers of teachers being trained in state colleges are capped, but the private colleges can go from one to two intakes per year with the same number of students in each intake as an undergraduate intake in a state college, then it's unsurprising that the saturation point is being exceeded.

    It’s not much good them being told they won’t get a job when starting college, it would be better to tell them before they apply.

    As a matter of interest, what private colleges are training primary teachers?


  • #2


    I'm assuming that refers to the Hibernia course.


  • #2


    Just curious would this put people off becoming a primary teacher? I'm planning on applying for the PME in the next two years so articles like this kind of concern me. I also wouldn't have much faith in the gov using the lower student numbers to reduce class size tbh


  • #2


    Lillyfae wrote: »
    To what level? Would you wait until the ratio is 1:10? Or 1:5?

    20 to one would be a start . But not using SET, administrative principals to massage figures would help too.


  • #2


    Woah wrote: »
    Just curious would this put people off becoming a primary teacher? I'm planning on applying for the PME in the next two years so articles like this kind of concern me. I also wouldn't have much faith in the gov using the lower student numbers to reduce class size tbh

    Yes, and it should put people off. Total waste of resources to train more people than will be needed if they already know now.


  • #2


    20 to one would be a start . But not using SET, administrative principals to massage figures would help too.

    Absolutely. People hear the ratio is 25:1 and think that's the biggest a class can be and are baffled then when their child is in a class of 30+


  • #2


    Woah wrote: »
    Just curious would this put people off becoming a primary teacher? I'm planning on applying for the PME in the next two years so articles like this kind of concern me. I also wouldn't have much faith in the gov using the lower student numbers to reduce class size tbh

    It's probably easier now then it will be in the future so if you really want to be a teacher then don't let it put you off, there's also plenty of work abroad too


  • #2


    I'll believe it when I see it. I'm only out of college a few years and when I was casually subbing my phone would be buzzing all morning every day from principals crying out for me to work if I knew anyone with a pulse that had a TC number. We found it very hard to get subs this year.


  • #2


    Coneygree wrote: »
    I'll believe it when I see it. I'm only out of college a few years and when I was casually subbing my phone would be buzzing all morning every day from principals crying out for me to work if I knew anyone with a pulse that had a TC number. We found it very hard to get subs this year.

    That's only for subs really. Maternity/fixed-terms can be hard to get unless you are in Dublin.


  • #2


    Don't worry, with the current stress and workload many of these teachers won't stay in the system long enough for there to be a worry of oversupply.

    Crazy talk when we haven't been able to get substitute teachers this year..they should focus on today's problems rather than thinking about 15 years' time.


  • #2


    Considering this myself. I am planning on doing the HL Irish this year with the idea to start next year. I couldnt go through all that with a mortgage and two kids and have no job at the end of it! Probably better off doing the SNA course then and having a job next year!



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