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Raised bed.

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 5,671 ✭✭✭ tom1ie


    Hi all.
    I am in the process of building a raised bed with a hinged lid that has a hooped polytunnel attached to the lid.
    I will be using the square foot gardening method for this raised bed.
    Has anyone built a raised bed before and lined the inside of the timber with a damp proof membrane or even heavy duty plastic bags, so as to protect the timber?
    I am painting the outside with black exterior paint, but I don’t want to paint the inside, to keep chemicals away from the soil etc.
    Thanks all.


«1

Comments



  • If you're putting membrane in it won't matter if the inside is painted. Paint will help preserve it.




  • tom1ie wrote: »
    Hi all.
    I am in the process of building a raised bed with a hinged lid that has a hooped polytunnel attached to the lid.
    I will be using the square foot gardening method for this raised bed.
    Has anyone built a raised bed before and lined the inside of the timber with a damp proof membrane or even heavy duty plastic bags, so as to protect the timber?
    I am painting the outside with black exterior paint, but I don’t want to paint the inside, to keep chemicals away from the soil etc.
    Thanks all.

    Hello,
    I have put in similar beds with just regular untreated wood and hy have held up quite good. Painted outside and not inside.

    In my opinion ou shouldnt put plastic inside the bed on the sides as the soil can sort of 'sweat' if that makes sense and damage the soil structure. Leave the bare wood and paint it outside. Be better for your plants long term.




  • Stephen93 wrote: »
    Hello,
    I have put in similar beds with just regular untreated wood and hy have held up quite good. Painted outside and not inside.

    In my opinion ou shouldnt put plastic inside the bed on the sides as the soil can sort of 'sweat' if that makes sense and damage the soil structure. Leave the bare wood and paint it outside. Be better for your plants long term.

    Yeah this makes sense. Thanks.




  • tom1ie wrote: »
    Hi all.
    I am in the process of building a raised bed with a hinged lid that has a hooped polytunnel attached to the lid.
    I will be using the square foot gardening method for this raised bed.
    Has anyone built a raised bed before and lined the inside of the timber with a damp proof membrane or even heavy duty plastic bags, so as to protect the timber?
    I am painting the outside with black exterior paint, but I don’t want to paint the inside, to keep chemicals away from the soil etc.
    Thanks all.


    I built two of these in February. As you, i painted the outside, but I lined the inside with cut to measure black plastic from thicker "rubble bags". It stands to reason that the timber will last longer when the earth inside won't be up against it.


    As you also, I have hinged lids that have a hooped polytunnel attached to the lid (hoophouses).


    Just a tip, I put hinges on both sides - using 4" butt hinges with a removable centre pin - so that the lids will open from either side, as the hoophouses are 4' wide.




  • What wood did you use?
    I see recommendations of Larch and Cedar but not sure the local building supply store will have it.


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  • Samson1 wrote: »
    I built two of these in February. As you, i painted the outside, but I lined the inside with cut to measure black plastic from thicker "rubble bags". It stands to reason that the timber will last longer when the earth inside won't be up against it.


    As you also, I have hinged lids that have a hooped polytunnel attached to the lid (hoophouses).


    Just a tip, I put hinges on both sides - using 4" butt hinges with a removable centre pin - so that the lids will open from either side, as the hoophouses are 4' wide.

    Great idea.
    I was planning on putting a set of boot lid struts on the hinged side but new ones are costly and old ones from a breakers yard are quite powerful so always want to push the lid open so I’d need a latching system for the bed.

    I’ve set mine up to have a double layer of greenhouse plastic with an air gap in between.

    How are these working out for you?




  • What wood did you use?
    I see recommendations of Larch and Cedar but not sure the local building supply store will have it.

    I used scaffolding planks that I got for €8 a piece. I just painted the outside with exterior paint.
    Good thing about scaffolding planks is they are untreated so no harsh chemicals and they are 8” wide so are perfect for ripping in two or four along the length to get a 4x2 or 2x2.




  • What wood did you use?
    I see recommendations of Larch and Cedar but not sure the local building supply store will have it.

    Larch would be wonderful, but you could buy a lot of veg with what it will cost you!




  • I built a decent sized raised bed at the beginning of lockdown using what I happened to have, which was a couple of decking planks, some discarded shuttering planks and some rejected lengths of 3x2 left over from a job on the house. I lined the sides with an old tarp (one of those woven plastic things). It won't win any beauty pageants but it is sound and practical, and looks fine. I previously had raised beds built that were lined with black plastic, they were brilliant and the timber stayed sound.




  • tom1ie wrote: »
    Great idea.
    I was planning on putting a set of boot lid struts on the hinged side but new ones are costly and old ones from a breakers yard are quite powerful so always want to push the lid open so I’d need a latching system for the bed.

    I’ve set mine up to have a double layer of greenhouse plastic with an air gap in between.

    How are these working out for you?


    Yes, I looked at the idea of struts too but ruled them out when I hinged both sides.


    I also set mine up to allow for adding a second layer of greenhouse plastic at a later date.


    However, they are working fine with a single layer of 800 grm ? greenhouse plastic, and get up to a maximum daily temperature of about 48C, and a minimum overnight temperature of 11C to 13C for the past week.


    My biggest fear was a lack of ventilation, I initially was going to cut small vent holes in the plastic in either end, but finally went with propping the lids open about 9", and dropping down 12" of enviromesh all round and securing that, and tying the lid down with bungee cords (between 2 handles). It allows a good airflow and the tomato plants went in in the past week or so and they seem happy out so far!



    I used rough red deal 9" x 2".


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  • Throw up a photo so we can see the handiwork




  • Samson1 wrote: »
    Yes, I looked at the idea of struts too but ruled them out when I hinged both sides.


    I also set mine up to allow for adding a second layer of greenhouse plastic at a later date.


    However, they are working fine with a single layer of 800 grm ? greenhouse plastic, and get up to a maximum daily temperature of about 48C, and a minimum overnight temperature of 11C to 13C for the past week.


    My biggest fear was a lack of ventilation, I initially was going to cut small vent holes in the plastic in either end, but finally went with propping the lids open about 9", and dropping down 12" of enviromesh all round and securing that, and tying the lid down with bungee cords (between 2 handles). It allows a good airflow and the tomato plants went in in the past week or so and they seem happy out so far!



    I used rough red deal 9" x 2".


    Excellent. We must be watching the same you tube videos!!

    What’s enviromesh though?

    I’m levelling the ground and putting down the weed barrier (which I’ll be stapling to the bottom of the raised bed) this morning.

    Then I’m hoping to get my soil in today. (1/3 compost 1/3 peat moss 1/3 vermiculite).
    If the weather stays somewhat reasonable I might get my square foot grid in and some of the tomato plants.




  • tom1ie wrote: »
    Excellent. We must be watching the same you tube videos!!

    What’s enviromesh though?

    I’m levelling the ground and putting down the weed barrier (which I’ll be stapling to the bottom of the raised bed) this morning.

    Then I’m hoping to get my soil in today. (1/3 compost 1/3 peat moss 1/3 vermiculite).
    If the weather stays somewhat reasonable I might get my square foot grid in and some of the tomato plants.




    I think we are definitely watching the same videos !!


    Is it spelled 'environmesh' ? It is a very fine netting that stops the bogs getting through. Will allow air (and water) through if necessary. Can be a bit dear but can be reused year after year.




  • tom1ie wrote: »
    ...


    Then I’m hoping to get my soil in today. (1/3 compost 1/3 peat moss 1/3 vermiculite).
    If the weather stays somewhat reasonable I might get my square foot grid in and some of the tomato plants.


    I used peat moss / compost / manure / normal soil.

    Vermiculite / grit would be good for drainage, but 1/3rd sounds a lot.
    I used the peat moss to retain moisture?




  • Samson1 wrote: »
    I think we are definitely watching the same videos !!


    Is it spelled 'environmesh' ? It is a very fine netting that stops the bogs getting through. Will allow air (and water) through if necessary. Can be a bit dear but can be reused year after year.

    That looks a lot like standard construction insect mesh.

    I bought a big roll of it, probably from this crowd. Can't remember how much it cost me.

    https://eurometals.ie/product/insect-mesh/




  • Hi guys,

    I just assembled a flat-pack raised bed this evening and need advice on the next step (I am a complete rookie when it comes to gardening). Its about 2.2 metres long and 66 cm wide and 30 cm (12 inches) in height from the ground to the top of the frame.

    Is the most effective way of planting vegetables digging into the existing ground soil, and adding top soil and compost to the top of the box? How much compost would I need- I read somewhere that it should be a 60% soil-30% compost ratio. Haven't finalised exactly where to place it in the garden yet either- is a suntrap or shelter better?

    Am I better off sectioning off each segment with mesh to "crop manage" so to speak?

    Thanks in advance.




  • Hi guys,

    I just assembled a flat-pack raised bed this evening and need advice on the next step (I am a complete rookie when it comes to gardening). Its about 2.2 metres long and 66 cm wide and 30 cm (12 inches) in height from the ground to the top of the frame.

    Is the most effective way of planting vegetables digging into the existing ground soil, and adding top soil and compost to the top of the box? How much compost would I need- I read somewhere that it should be a 60% soil-30% compost ratio. Haven't finalised exactly where to place it in the garden yet either- is a suntrap or shelter better?

    Am I better off sectioning off each segment with mesh to "crop manage" so to speak?

    Thanks in advance.

    Shade or sun depends on what you want to grow




  • Throw up a photo so we can see the handiwork


    Have failed to put them up? Seems to have to be a URL ??




  • Rodin wrote: »
    Shade or sun depends on what you want to grow

    Carrots, lettuce and scallions (not my choice :D)




  • Carrots, lettuce and scallions (not my choice :D)

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own


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  • I made my raised beds from old picnic tables, I put sheets cardboard on the base before filling with compost/manure every 12 months.

    No bending or stooping, no slugs or animal damage. A chainsaw some nails and a hammer and it's a quick job. I've used scaffold boards on the edges for some to make a deeper bed.

    "Very soon we are going to Mars. You wouldn't have been going to Mars if my opponent won, that I can tell you. You wouldn't even be thinking about it."

    Donald Trump, March 13th 2018.





  • Samson1 wrote: »
    I used peat moss / compost / manure / normal soil.

    Vermiculite / grit would be good for drainage, but 1/3rd sounds a lot.
    I used the peat moss to retain moisture?

    Yep I found vermiculite was quite expensive everywhere, but then I found a 100l bag for €22.50 which is great value, so I got 3 bags as my 8x4 bed is taking approx 900l of soil mix.
    Link to the vermiculite:
    https://mybuildingsupplies.ie/product/micafill-per-bag-lge-100l




  • Hi guys,

    I just assembled a flat-pack raised bed this evening and need advice on the next step (I am a complete rookie when it comes to gardening). Its about 2.2 metres long and 66 cm wide and 30 cm (12 inches) in height from the ground to the top of the frame.

    Is the most effective way of planting vegetables digging into the existing ground soil, and adding top soil and compost to the top of the box? How much compost would I need- I read somewhere that it should be a 60% soil-30% compost ratio. Haven't finalised exactly where to place it in the garden yet either- is a suntrap or shelter better?

    Am I better off sectioning off each segment with mesh to "crop manage" so to speak?

    Thanks in advance.

    I am following the square foot gardening method.
    1/3 vermiculite
    1/3 compost
    1/3 peat moss for the soil mix.
    You then divide the bed up into squares and plant veg in the squares. Looks to be quite efficient.
    Check out the gardening channel on you tube and search square foot gardening
    I’ve added a hinged hoop greenhouse “lid” to extend the growing season. (That’s the theory anyway!)




  • I made my raised beds from old picnic tables, I put sheets cardboard on the base before filling with compost/manure every 12 months.

    No bending or stooping, no slugs or animal damage. A chainsaw some nails and a hammer and it's a quick job. I've used scaffold boards on the edges for some to make a deeper bed.

    Nice!
    How do you put up a photo?




  • We built waist high beds from concrete blocks . Filled with top soil, well rotted horse manure 3 years ago. We added chicken manure ( the pellets) in early spring .




  • What wood did you use?
    I see recommendations of Larch and Cedar but not sure the local building supply store will have it.

    Where are you based? I got larch sleepers from a small sawmills in Kilkenny and they were very reasonable. Also got larch and Douglas fir for my mother in law from another place in Cork that were reasonable too I thought.




  • Throw up a photo so we can see the handiwork


    attached




  • Throw up a photo so we can see the handiwork


    att




  • Throw up a photo so we can see the handiwork




    att x 2


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  • Lumen wrote: »
    That looks a lot like standard construction insect mesh.

    I bought a big roll of it, probably from this crowd. Can't remember how much it cost me.

    https://eurometals.ie/product/insect-mesh/


    That stuff is aluminium insect mesh - that's interesting, mine is more plastic.


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