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Living in Ireland vs living in Italy

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  • Just out of curiosity how come you want to join the Guards here in Ireland as opposed to joining The Carabinieri or Polizia di Stato or even the police force in another eu country or even the US. Not wanting to be rude or anything like that I just find it kinda of odd that someone would come to Ireland in order to join our police force.




  • Stephen15 wrote: »
    Just out of curiosity how come you want to join the Guards here in Ireland as opposed to joining The Carabinieri or Polizia di Stato or even the police force in another eu country or even the US. Not wanting to be rude or anything like that I just find it kinda of odd that someone would come to Ireland in order to join our police force.
    Legitimate question.
    Actually, I will compete in the selection for the Italian Police as well. This year's recruitment campaign is open, for the first time, to people who haven't done the military service (that's been only professional since 2005).

    But, since I like Ireland and I was already thinking of moving there to work as a secondary school teacher once I graduate, I checked if An Garda accepts foreigners, as I knew the Irish Army does, and they do. I've come to realise that I really want to become a policeman, and competing in more than one campaign will give me more possibilities.
    Ireland is the only European country where English is the main language which allows non-resident foreigners to join its Police Force; plus, I feel a particular affection for your country, and I think I wouldn't have big problems to adapt myself to living there.

    Regarding the U.S., I hope I will never be forced to move there.

    Plus, I don't know any Gardai, but I'm pretty sure that there aren't many nostalgic for Mussolini up there.




  • Plus, I don't know any Gardai, but I'm pretty sure that there aren't many nostalgic for Mussolini up there.

    Well they were pretty much founded by someone with an admiration for Il Duce.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eoin_O%27Duffy




  • You're mixing apples and bananas.

    Comparing Ireland to Italy is like comparing Napoli to Trieste...everything's different.

    I will never step foot on Italian soil again, as I was robbed blind there, but anyways, being your neighbor from Adriatic's east coast, I'd only say this: if you care about career & money, come to Ireland. If you care more about joy of life, stay where you are.

    Good luck (& btw. I voted for you in Eurovision twice, Occidentali's Karma should have won).




  • Well they were pretty much founded by someone with an admiration for Il Duce.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eoin_O%27Duffy


    True, but at that time (especially before Italy joined Germany in the war) many people around the world admired him, even among the Allies. Churchill himself, for example. And we could say that many Irish republicans had their reasons to uphold the Axies powers, since their war against the Allies was useful to weaken the UK.

    CroFag wrote: »
    You're mixing apples and bananas.

    Comparing Ireland to Italy is like comparing Napoli to Trieste...everything's different.

    I will never step foot on Italian soil again, as I was robbed blind there, but anyways, being your neighbor from Adriatic's east coast, I'd only say this: if you care about career & money, come to Ireland. If you care more about joy of life, stay where you are.

    Good luck (& btw. I voted for you in Eurovision twice, Occidentali's Karma should have won).


    Hehe, actually I've asked what the best and the worts aspects of living in those countries are. I think it's possible to do that.

    Are you from Croatia or Slovenia, perhaps?
    I'm sorry, it's true that my country is very expensive, especially if comparing to the Adriatic's East coast prices and incomes.

    Actually, I don't think that living in Italy automatically means a more cheerful life than in Northern Europe. There are many stressed people here too, who work way too much or are simply not able to enjoy what Italy has to offer. And Italian bureaucracy is not a friend of relax, that's a sure thing.

    And certainly also in Ireland there are people who can take the most from life. Actually, I think I would enjoy more sunny days in a place which has less ones, for instance.


    About Eurovision: I don't watch it, and I don't like Gabbani's song, actually, but thanks for the support :D


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  • Haha, I love Canzone Italiana in general, there are radio shows in Croatia that play only that & although my Italian is really bad I tend to enjoy this music very much.

    I'm a Croat living in Ireland for a couple of years and I have mixed emotions about it. I love the Irish people, their free spirit, their relaxed atttitude, this beautiful green Island, awesome beaches and hills.

    I don't like that traffic in the capital city is organized worse than anywhere in eastern Europe.

    I get close to a nervous breakdown trying to get from one Dublin suburb to another using a public transport.

    I live in a rough neigborhood where there's lots of crime & anti-social behavior and Garda (police) station is reduced and good as closed. I actually needed them once and was sent off.

    Beuatiful park next to my workplace is prohibited for general public as it is in private hands, hughe ugly black fence with nasty spikes is protecting the rich and powerful from my persona sitting in the grass. Class divide in this country is appaling.

    So, there's good and bads, like everywhere. But if you're from north of Italy which is one of the most developed regions of Europe and culturally painfully beautiful, I guess you can make a decent living there. If you need a change, sure, come and join us here on an emerald Isle.

    Fáilte (:




  • CroFag wrote: »
    Haha, I love Canzone Italiana in general, there are radio shows in Croatia that play only that & although my Italian is really bad I tend to enjoy this music very much.

    I'm a Croat living in Ireland for a couple of years and I have mixed emotions about it. I love the Irish people, their free spirit, their relaxed atttitude, this beautiful green Island, awesome beaches and hills.

    I don't like that traffic in the capital city is organized worse than anywhere in eastern Europe.

    I get close to a nervous breakdown trying to get from one Dublin suburb to another using a public transport.

    I live in a rough neigborhood where there's lots of crime & anti-social behavior and Garda (police) station is reduced and good as closed. I actually needed them once and was sent off.

    Beuatiful park next to my workplace is prohibited for general public as it is in private hands, hughe ugly black fence with nasty spikes is protecting the rich and powerful from my persona sitting in the grass. Class divide in this country is appaling.

    So, there's good and bads, like everywhere. But if you're from north of Italy which is one of the most developed regions of Europe and culturally painfully beautiful, I guess you can make a decent living there. If you need a change, sure, come and join us here on an emerald Isle.

    Fáilte (:


    Sorry to hear that. Especially about the Garda. If I come to Ireland, as I said, it'll be to be a Garda, and I hope I'll never have to refuse anyone my help. Or I'll come to teach pupils who are probably from very wealthy families, so I could become part of the class divide issue (that is more evident in English speaking countries than in Italy, regarding education).

    I think I will just see how things work: if I proceed through the selection process, brilliant, if not, I will try again the next time, if I don't get into the Italian Police meanwhile.




  • Did you make it to Ireland in the end?




  • josip wrote: »
    Did you make it to Ireland in the end?
    Unfortunately, I had some matters to attend to in Italy that have kept me there, and still are, at least for another short while.


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