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En-suite final bill question

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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,250 ✭✭✭Kaisr Sose


    €100 discount on €5,700 plus vat...woh hoo indeed. You appear to be pleased with it so thats good. A few hundred over paid is not that much in the life of the work.

    I would not reveal budget. Get detailed quotes and then compare to my budget. Try to negotiate or scale back the materials or simplify the job to get inside budget if necessary.



  • Registered Users Posts: 16,953 ✭✭✭✭Sleeper12


    It's worth pointing out that there is a massive difference between an estimate and a quote. An estimate has no legal meaning as such. An estimate is commonly referred to as a guesstimate. You are literally guessing how much it might cost. A job can come in double the estimate but still the contractor gets paid. It's a waste of time asking for an estimate from this point of view.

    A quote is what everyone should be looking for and getting before the contractors start. We don't start a job until the homeowner has a firm quote from us. When we finish all they have to pay it the quote, unless they added on extras. A quote is part of a legal contract. A quote makes it very difficult for the contractor to look for more money. An estimate means nothing & contractor can still change whatever they want at the end of the job



  • Registered Users Posts: 554 ✭✭✭mykrodot


    The entire job, materials and labour has come in at about €9500. The irony is that I had a quote from a one stop shop bathroom company for €10K and went the plumber route/buying the stuff myself in order to save money. Its much of a muchness in the long run but at least I like it. I repainted the walls and skirting board myself (didn't go for fully tiled) so I provided some labour which might have saved the extra €500.

    Compared to some people's experiences I am lucky.



  • Registered Users Posts: 554 ✭✭✭mykrodot


    this is what I should have gone for. A quote. I did it with the kitchen, the interior painting and some fencing outside. All came in exactly on quote as they should. And typically the bathroom was by far the most expensive job…. which I tried but didn't get a quote on! As I said lesson learnt.



  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭20/20


    When you say the tiling was working out at just over €100 per m² how many Sq M of tiling were involved.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,250 ✭✭✭Kaisr Sose


    Cant recall exactly, but 12-15 comes to mind. Not complicated tiling.

    Post edited by Kaisr Sose on


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,988 ✭✭✭Padre_Pio


    Would you mind showing where this requirement for certification is called out?

    Edit: never mind, you are correct. Part 7 rules.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,988 ✭✭✭Padre_Pio


    Any decent tradesman is on minimum of 50k a year. So at least 1k a week.

    Add in business costs, tools, running a van and VAT, and youre close to 1800 minimum, depending on the trade, where they're located, the size of their operation etc.

    So my rule of thumb is that one tradesman will cost 400euro a day. I had two lads fitting roof windows and it was a 900euro in labour for a full 10 hours work.



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