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Seeking planning in Greenbelt am I mad?

  • 23-05-2023 9:46am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 77 ✭✭


    I'm looking to be a 1st time home owner. I wanted to build my house and at first it seemed to be a no brainer. My parent was left agricultural land in Cork with the intention that if anyone in the family wanted to build it could be used as an option.

    My partner and I more or less know what we want whilst keeping the notion of the reality regarding planning authorities etc.

    Our first hurdle is, the land is located in a greenbelt zone - our architect advised we can still submit pre planning proposal with caution but not to get hopes up too much.

    Surely with shortage on housing etc that there might be exception? Is it possible to get approval in this zone?



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 695 ✭✭✭JimmyMW


    Have you any local need? From the area etc?



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,370 ✭✭✭monkeybutter


    greenbelts dont exist in ireland, its an english construct



  • Registered Users Posts: 695 ✭✭✭JimmyMW




  • Registered Users Posts: 1,786 ✭✭✭DownByTheGarden


    When trying to show how smart you are backfires :)



  • Registered Users Posts: 528 ✭✭✭SupaCat95


    My sister and husband tried the same thing as you in a similar circumstances. Family farm, local ties. Cork co co rejected them several times. My sister never gives away anything or is amenable to "e50 and a pigs arse" (aka brown paper envelope) or what ever it takes to get done. They gave up and moved to the city. Expect revisions refusals and resubmissions. If there was a pre-existing house on the site that is grounds to rebuild.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,370 ✭✭✭monkeybutter


    greenbelts in england have statutory protection and are a thing

    some cork county council map means nothing, they may plan to use something similar but it used on a whim, so I am still proper smart

    there are green and brown sites



  • Registered Users Posts: 127 ✭✭FJMC


    Very difficult to build in rural areas particularly in the greenbelt without a strong connection to the land - already farming, son or daughter of a farmer, taking over a farm, etc. - and also a question whether any planning has already been given for any new dwellings previously on the farm holding.

    Often the easier option for rural dwelling is to renovate a disused vernacular building - and abandoned farmhouse, cottage, etc. or a redundant traditional agricultural building, etc. You may be able to renovate these and also build extensions.

    Your best bet is to read through the local planning guidance - the local development plan - and speak to a local planner.

    F



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,370 ✭✭✭monkeybutter


    did they move back there? already own a house somewhere else?

    at this stage unless you have a local job of some sort it can be looked down on

    local needs is an unconstitutional scam and very much a matter of who you know to get around it



  • Registered Users Posts: 45,797 ✭✭✭✭muffler


    Listen, if a County or local development plan stipulates green belt areas then it's legal. There is quite a lengthy legal process involved in establishing zoned areas so please don't be so presumptuous about something you evidently know nothing about. I've been in the planning business for longer than I care to remember and I hate to see these "Billy on the barstool" type comments.



  • Registered Users Posts: 528 ✭✭✭SupaCat95


    Nope, the process broke them it costs a fortune to meet a planning official and then go back and revise with your architect. They said "fupp that" and moved back to a nice area of Cork city.

    Just because you go to a meeting, after having all your paper work and environmental impact reports and what not done, is no guarantee that they will be accepted. How many blows like that can you sustain? A blue print, paper work and solicitors fees is not a guarantee of planning permission accepted. Know the territory before you go. Might be better off buying a derelict site and doing it up as you won't need planning permission.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 528 ✭✭✭SupaCat95


    Please don't ask me what plans, revisions solicitors paperwork, envoirnmental impact costs because nobody ever talks about it. Sister would give a vague answer. This "cute hoor" business is not really helpful to anyone in Ireland. It certainly doesn't impress me.



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 17,680 Mod ✭✭✭✭DOCARCH


    Mod Note: Please keep on topic without going down the rabbit hole of constitutional matters and conspiracy theories!

    The OP query is relatively simple one!



  • Registered Users Posts: 345 ✭✭iniscealtra


    @jimmy5694 If your parent was left land there you are not local and won’t meet local needs. Unless you have lived in that area (as in said parish) for over ten years, have kids in local schools, work in the community and are active in local community organistations you will not meet local needs if it is rural. If you don’t have local need you will not get planning. But if you organise a pre planning meeting with the council you can ask questions and find answers.

    if it is in the city and zoned for development that is different,



  • Registered Users Posts: 345 ✭✭iniscealtra


    @jimmy5694 Your architect has sense. Pre-planning will tell you what you need to know as will the county or city development plan if you réad it



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,786 ✭✭✭DownByTheGarden


    Ive seen houses built where people didnt have local needs but they seemed to be architecturally amazing houses that really improved the area. Maybe talk to a few different architects as well as the planners



  • Registered Users Posts: 528 ✭✭✭SupaCat95


    The wonder of the brown envelope. Many years ago two engineers were let go out of Kilkenny county council because they would not sign a contract not to do outside "consultancy" work.



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