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The future of fencing?

  • 19-05-2023 1:55pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,395 ✭✭✭


    Concrete posts that can be driven with a post driver, and take staples. Plenty of chat in the video, but we don't see a post being driven, or taking a staple. He's not giving much away about the price either...... Has anyone seen these?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYog8sqpqjM



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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,868 ✭✭✭SuperTortoise


    That popped up on my youtube feed yesterday, i was impressed by it, the fella talked a good talk at least, just wondering where the catch is?

    Could be price as that was'nt mentioned, or maybe they won't last as long as a real concrete post i don't know, but i said to myself i must look into them more.

    Has anyone priced them?



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,310 ✭✭✭jaymla627


    I'd say on rocky ground types they'd just shatter, dangerous job too driving them and get a lump of concrete in the head if it did happen,

    We use the knacker blocks here in places where theirs sheets of rock a smaller neater version of the above would be nearly a better job



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,808 ✭✭✭kevthegaff


    I wouldn't like them, taking up space. I have ordered 10 clipex posts, gona see how they go. Only worry is the guy with a mower! A few guys selling the concrete posts from the railway, seen to be happy with them but u need to get a digger in



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,894 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    Roughly £13 for the post and £47 for the 7' strainer. Plus vat.

    What they were using them for was an ideal use - small field in or around yard or a house. Can't see many folk fencing full fields with them though. Maybe the strainer posts will get more widespread use.

    The man with the mower is a menace to all fences. Or the man with the tanker coating the posts in slurry.

    They are installed across the road from Ballymena mart one of the big marts in the north - if any of you are up at it. The factory making them is just up the road.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,512 ✭✭✭Cavanjack


    Anyone use single slats for strainers or gate post? The idea came into my head watching that video



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,356 ✭✭✭148multi




  • Registered Users Posts: 4,569 ✭✭✭endainoz


    I think clipex is the future of fencing myself, fantastic job but not cheap. However they should last a very long time compared to a non treated post. Would love to get into hedge laying for field boundaries, but these things take alot of time to grow and skill to lay.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,395 ✭✭✭hopeso


    Do you know how they take staples? The only thing I can think of is that they have a strip of plastic or something running down the length of the post.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,356 ✭✭✭148multi




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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,512 ✭✭✭Cavanjack




  • Registered Users Posts: 6,624 ✭✭✭amacca


    I have an old style post driver...small spike in the center...massive animal of a thing...I'd be afraid the post driver would smash the concrete strainer tbh


    Is there a lot of cellulose in the concrete mix ...or something that leaves a bit of flexibility in it


    I could see a couple of uses around here if they can take a battering with the kind of post driver I have


    If not, then proper esb poles have a decent long life



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,894 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    @amacca - they are designed to be put in with a post knocker. You'll need the cap though to do it. It seems to be to protect the post when knocking in.

    They have some videos up on the fb and YT pages of them being knocked on.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,524 ✭✭✭mr.stonewall


    Anyone here use chestnut stakes and if so how have you found them. Larch is a bit hit and miss unless you get stakes from the darker heartwood.

    Long term it's something to consider having some element of self sufficiency with fencing



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,624 ✭✭✭amacca


    I'd say I'd have to modify my one....its an older piece of kit, the plate contacting the post has a spike in it. The spike would have to go anyway I'd say.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,407 ✭✭✭cjpm


    If there is some bit of moisture in the ground the willows could well start growing. Have a good few here. Only problem after a few years is that you need to trim the new branches that grow each year and the bark started growing out eventually like a tree.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,472 ✭✭✭Castlekeeper


    That's the actual idea, free homegrown permanent fence posts.

    The bit of maintenance won't kill me.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,905 ✭✭✭yosemitesam1


    Next best thing to oak only without the issue of corroding galvanize



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,472 ✭✭✭Castlekeeper


    What kind of chestnut is this? Common horse chestnut conker trees or imported sweet chestnut ot other species?



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,524 ✭✭✭mr.stonewall


    Sweet chestnut or Spanish chestnut



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,512 ✭✭✭Cavanjack


    Are the creosote posts gone up the north too?



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,894 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    They are going, but still available. From a quick Google Mackins in Newry, East Down Farmers, and a few others further up from the border are advertising them.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,178 ✭✭✭✭Nekarsulm


    McCorry Agri just across the border from Ballyconnel still have the creosote posts.

    When they are gone I think I'll be going clipEx or similar.

    Have used single slats for hanging gates, using ones removed from tanks.

    I put two "back to back" (ie, the surface that the animal walks on, against each other) and clamp them together with the top and bottom hangers.

    1 foot bucket on the digger and dig as small a hole as possible, 5 to 6 foot deep (11 foot slat used).

    Stand up the slat, you'll be using the digger arm for this, and back fill.

    Compact the soil stone around the post as you go, or throw in a mixerfull of concrete around the butt if its a long gate being hung.



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,808 ✭✭✭kevthegaff


    Knocked down a clipex stake yesterday, no hardship whatsoever and staple(although expensive) should last longer. I'll replace broken ones with clip ex from now on with timber or concrete for strainers



  • Registered Users Posts: 772 ✭✭✭Cattlepen


    I have clipex for a while now but I’m still not convinced by them. I think there is greater potential for injury to man and beast with them. Very sharp edges at the top of them.

    Also they are desperate to look at. Very industrial looking



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,808 ✭✭✭kevthegaff


    Have u most of the farm with them, they are sharp



  • Registered Users Posts: 772 ✭✭✭Cattlepen


    No. I always used creosote posts with sheepwire and Barb. I only got them to run double strand of electric in a few places. IMO it would look pretty shite if it was all done with clipex



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,569 ✭✭✭endainoz


    I think they look a great job to be honest, wouldn't consider them industrial anyway. They are a bit sharp alright, but one could make the same argument for barbed wire or whitethorn.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,543 ✭✭✭✭patsy_mccabe


    How about using rebar as posts. I've it done here along water trenches. Have some up over 10 years and not a bother. Use screw on insulators from Gallagher. I put a bend at the top to stop cattle getting injured if they were to jump on top. It also acts as a handle to push the 18" typically into the ground. Only good for straight runs though.

    Gallagher Screw-On Insulator 25Pk 5.8'' White (coopsuperstores.ie)

    'The Bishops blessed the Blueshirts in Galway, As they sailed beneath the Swastika to Spain'



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