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Rejuvenate farm hedgerows with colour.

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  • 26-03-2023 1:09am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,331 ✭✭✭


    I have thought about rejuvenating some of the old hedgerows (stone walls) around the fields. Ivy is beginning to take hold on the older trees ( natural coppicing so unconcerned) so figure I might help out.

    Would be nice to increase the colour so my list of trees that I have thought about are:

    Rowan, Crab apple, Hawthorn and holly. The first 3 will give a lovely spring colour to the place.

    Any other suggestions of any other native species ?

    Would planting them about a foot or two away from the stone walls be sufficient in protecting the walls ?

    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,463 ✭✭✭thinkabouit


    Have you thought about laying whatever hedgerows & trees are there? Also resting the land ie (let what ever grows grow) would cost you nothing.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,331 ✭✭✭80sDiesel


    Fairly inexpensive (except for the tree tubes) to plant trees and have done it before. Laying is an art so would not attempt that.

    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,463 ✭✭✭thinkabouit


    i layed our hedge in the back garden last year after watching some basic videos on YouTube & it’s come back fantastic.

    Rome wasn’t built in a day.

    my recommendation though for the route your going is have a look at the all Ireland pollinator plan.

    They have a lot of great information & recommendations.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,331 ✭✭✭80sDiesel


    .Cheers

    Post edited by 80sDiesel on

    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,948 ✭✭✭yosemitesam1




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  • Registered Users Posts: 347 ✭✭iniscealtra


    Spindle & guelder rose



  • Registered Users Posts: 36 Itryhard


    Beech has colour and leaves all year



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,331 ✭✭✭80sDiesel


    Dont think that's native although it is well established now in ireland. Doesn't grow in my place so wouldn't fit the current landscape.

    Although I did think about adding some Scots pine but they are a pain to grow.

    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,440 ✭✭✭✭Danzy


    Laying to make a stock proof fence is an art, laying to thicken a hedge is not, you'd be well able for it, time is running out now though.


    Viburnum opulus, the guelder-rose is always a great colour boost, native, nice leavea, great colour with berries and flower's and a long time.


    Dog roses as well.


    Honey suckle.

    Native privet.

    Your hedge probably has lots of whitethorn, add in black thorn and Holly.


    With regards to the Ivy, it can get out of control and smother a tree, though the tree is probably in trouble as is.


    I often just cut some of the stalks at the bottom, to knock the Ivy back a bit .



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,440 ✭✭✭✭Danzy


    Scots Pine are a pain in the proverbial, one is better off keeping them in a pot for another year or two, till they get size.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,331 ✭✭✭80sDiesel


    Yes great idea. I planted about 30 and lost 20 before but they are a beautiful specimen of a tree. Had only one original in the whole place which was knocked in that storm a few years back.

    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,331 ✭✭✭80sDiesel


    I used to cut the ivy at the base too until I read more about the habitat it provides. Now I just let nature do its thing.

    Hadn't thought of the guelder-rose. Will do some research on it.

    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,180 ✭✭✭✭Base price


    Woodbine or honeysuckle is a native climbing plant and excellent to have in hedgerows. It is very attractive for pollinators like bumble bees and moths and small birds eat the berries in Winter. It has a lovely sweet scent that wafts through the air when your out herding on a Summer's morning/evening. It's one of my favourite plants.



  • Registered Users Posts: 859 ✭✭✭SnowyMuckish


    Dog rose is very colourful it has made a huge difference to our hedgerow in terms of insects and the hips have attracted a lot of thrushes and blackbirds.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,331 ✭✭✭80sDiesel


    This guys videos are great with regards to Irish flora.

    Forgot about the wild cherry which I might add.

    Wild cherry


    Honeysuckle

    Holly

    Crab Apple


    Guelder Rose


    Hawthorn


    And this channel has some 'Year in the life' tree videos

    Rowan


    And finally the spindle which like the guelder has a fantastic autumn colour.


    Think the above is my list. Will look to grow some scots pine in the old haggard where I can fence them off against animals (deer,rabbits,hares) and replant in later years.

    Edit: Also thought about an awkward half an acre beside a stream which I was letting the black thorn colonise. Might turn this also into a mini forest after spending the weekend reading and watching videos.

    Post edited by 80sDiesel on

    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,298 ✭✭✭Deub


    You could also try to take cuttings of what you like and plant them close to each other somewhere. In autumn (before they lose their leaves), remove the ones that died. You will have new trees used to your soil to plant next winter.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,636 ✭✭✭✭Furze99


    Woodbine is great but temporary too. Fuchsia is commonly seen in hedgerows now, not sure if native but very characteristic of parts of Ireland. Flowers a long time.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,180 ✭✭✭✭Base price


    Due to time constraints (a cow with the crubs out/calving) I only watched the woodbine/honeysuckle video which was very informative. Thanks for sharing and I will watch the other videos later.



  • Registered Users Posts: 21,170 ✭✭✭✭Water John


    Thanks guys, very informative. Have a good bit of planting to do, ACRES scheme. All along by fences, both tress and hedges.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,057 ✭✭✭bogman_bass


    If you want colour you can’t beat cherry



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