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Spare wheel in ev?

  • 20-03-2023 9:57am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 90 ✭✭


    Speaking with a work colleague this morning, who got a flat tyre over the weekend and has no car today. 6 tyre shops on Saturday had no tyre in that size ( fairly common size 18 tyre). They are now worried about their summer holidays in Ireland and a flat tyre.

    Which got me wondering, what ev's carry a spare wheel?



«13

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,509 ✭✭✭Redfox25


    Tyre plug kit, air compressor and a 5 min YouTube watch would sort most of this anxiety out.

    Could also have a spare tyre at home too if you wanted to.



  • Registered Users Posts: 19,623 ✭✭✭✭Cyrus


    any car with a boot can carry a spare wheel, ideally a space saver i guess.



  • Registered Users Posts: 90 ✭✭yermanthere


    Has anyone had to "fix" a flat with an ev? What system did you use?

    I know it's a common issue with new cars and not anti-ev, but it's a concern if driving cross country , especially at night.



  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 18,617 Mod ✭✭✭✭slave1


    Securing the wheel would be the issue, in a collision you don't want that flying forward into passengers



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,773 ✭✭✭✭the_amazing_raisin


    Had a flat in the UK, no spare or tyre kit so the solution was to call the AA


    The AA guy came out and fixed the tyre with a temporary plug, bit like this one


    That was enough to hold the tyre so I could get to a tyre shop and get a proper repair done. Tyre has been holding for about 6 months now, I know I'll need to get a replacement but I can do that when I'm ready

    Many cars nowadays don't have spare wheels as standard, manufacturers figured it's cheaper to hand out tyre kits or install puncture proof tyres in my case. Pro tip, the puncture protection only works once, second screw will deflate the tyre as I found out

    In the case of EVs, the batteries or motor are generally where the spare wheel would go so there's no space anyway. On top of that, the current obsession with crossovers mean big tyres are the norm now, so a spare wheel would take up half the boot

    Since that incident, I got myself a decent tyre pump and I'm probably going to get a jack and plug kit. If you get a jack make sure it's rated for the weight of an EV, they're generally a bit heavier than the equivalent ICE


    If you're getting an air pump, I recommend getting a heavy duty one like below

    They're bigger, heavier and a lot more expensive than the little plastic ones that are generally in breakdown kits. But I found the cheap plastic ones are very slow to inflate the tyre and often can't reach the desired pressure for bigger tyres

    "The internet never fails to misremember" - Sebastian Ruiz, aka Frost



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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,871 ✭✭✭Padre_Pio


    Doubt that's an issue when it's in the boot. Maybe tie it to a D-hook if there's one available?



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 5,731 Mod ✭✭✭✭graememk


    The compressor/pump that comes with the car has been a life saver.

    Drove from Dublin to Donegal with a nail in a tyre. Just pumped it up and drove on.

    I do have a space saver wheel too(there's a space for it in the Niro) but haven't had to use it yet.

    Worst one we've had yet was the other half was coming home and the low pressure alarm went off about a mile from home and lost about 10psi in that distance.

    Have a tyre plug kit at home so was able to plug it enough to get it to the local tyre place the next day.

    Still have a slow puncture on that wheel I need to investigate.


    Also an ev is just a car. And it's tyres are just tyres.



  • Registered Users Posts: 18,847 ✭✭✭✭Del2005


    Of my most recent batch of punctures none could be fixed with a plug or foam, damaged the sidewall on a stone that fell off a wall in my car and had a Stanley knife blade puncture a hire car. Luckily I have a space saver in my current car, though the full sized tyres don't fit in the boot due to the hybrid battery!, so was able to get the going again.

    There's also the issue that if you use the foam to get you going the tyre should be disposed of.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,557 ✭✭✭creedp


    I got a plug kit and jack/tyre wrench when I got the EV. I've used the plug kit twice. The second time didn't bother getting tyre patched and the plug lasted until tyre was replaced. The std pump that came with car does the job fine I didn't want to get a spare wheel as boot was already quite tight.

    I always throw the plug kit into the 7 seater when going on longer journeys as its spare is under the car and is a bast1rd to get out



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,793 ✭✭✭enricoh


    I've often used a plug on tyres, dead handy especially on front tyres as you don't need to take tyre off. I never bother getting them patched at a garage after. Either get aa or a plug kit op. Get a spare off done deal, scrapyard etc- if its a Nissan leaf it should have same fitment as a eg Micra.



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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,329 Mod ✭✭✭✭Gumbo


    Yes, loads. Plug kit from Amazon. Mini compressor from Amazon. Both fit in the glovebox if needed.

    EV same as any other ICE that don’t come with spare wheels in the last 15 years.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,006 ✭✭✭Sigma101


    As others have said, this isn't an EV issue - most small to medium new cars have no spare wheel.

    I used the puncture repair kit on my Leaf a few years ago. It didn't fix the puncture and I had to organise a tow. The gunk in the repair kit destroyed the tyre and it could no longer be repaired. I had to pay for the tow, the replacement tyre and a new sealant in the repair kit. I now have a spare wheel which I put in the boot if I'm travelling anywhere that's not local.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,773 ✭✭✭✭the_amazing_raisin


    I was tempted to just go on the temp plug from AA but I had about 900km of motorway driving to do that day so decided not to risk it


    I think the main thing to remember is that with the exception of a full size spare any solution to a flat tyre is designed to get you to a tyre shop for a repair or replacement

    Once you've got that in mind then a repair kit seems better value than a space saver for the amount of space needed

    They're both annoying jobs regardless, even more so in the rain on the side of a dual carriageway. But I don't think swapping out a wheel would be much easier than putting a plug in the flat tyre


    Also in the case of a space saver, you still have to bring the punctured wheel with you, unless you're planning to sacrifice it to the road gods. In my case, I wouldn't be enthusiastic about lifting a big 21 inch allow into my boot, especially if it's already full of luggage

    "The internet never fails to misremember" - Sebastian Ruiz, aka Frost



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 5,731 Mod ✭✭✭✭graememk


    Nothing more permanent than a temporary fix 😂



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,773 ✭✭✭✭the_amazing_raisin


    I think I had the same kit in my Leaf, air compressor and a can of gunk that screws onto the compressor and gets blown into the tyre

    I can say that I've never heard anything good about the gunk. It either works and destroys the tyre in the process, so you need a replacement instead of a repair. Or it doesn't work, still destroys the tyre and now you need a tow as well


    At least with the plug kit, the guys in the tyre shop were able to fix it with a permanent plug. To be fair, they warned me that they weren't supposed to repair that tyre since it had the puncture protection goop inside, but I had to get to a ferry that day so I told them I'd accept the risk and they did it.

    Still holding in place after 6 months, I know that tyre is probably going to need replacing soon but at least I've time to shop around and save up rather than having to pay out straight away

    "The internet never fails to misremember" - Sebastian Ruiz, aka Frost



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,773 ✭✭✭✭the_amazing_raisin


    Exactly 🤣

    Like I said, I know I'm on borrowed time but it's still holding pressure.

    I wouldn't try another 1000km road trip on it but it's working well enough for around town

    "The internet never fails to misremember" - Sebastian Ruiz, aka Frost



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,543 ✭✭✭zg3409


    My local tyre places throws a plug in the tyre and away you go, the same plug you can diy.

    As said you can get a space saver or spare, a jack and a spanner from.most scrap yards. Make sure to test fit spare as sometimes they won't fit depending on brakes on car.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,148 ✭✭✭✭Furze99


    Got a spare wheel off the dealer when purchasing car and carry it always in boot. Had to use it a couple of times. Madness not to have a spare tyre in many of the remoter parts of Ireland. Car manufacturers serve us poorly.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,773 ✭✭✭✭the_amazing_raisin


    There are a few different types of plug, some are temporary and others are permanent. The permanent ones require you to take the tyre off the rim and fit from the inside, that's what is currently holding my tyre together

    There's also the rubber strip type plugs which you can fit from the outside. It's a bit debatable how long they last, seems to be a bit of technique to get them right

    A lot of cars now seem to have security bolts on the tyres, so make sure you get the special fitting with the car, they've been known to walk off between owners or in the garage

    "The internet never fails to misremember" - Sebastian Ruiz, aka Frost



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,557 ✭✭✭creedp


    A local tyre place said they only use plugs, never patch repair punctures anymore so this is why I decided to leave the diy plug until tyre was replaced. Having said that I dont use that place anymore!



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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,557 ✭✭✭creedp


    The last issue is the biggest problem with a space saver. Its an awful pita to empty out a full boot in the p1ssing rain to get at it in the first place and then there is no space to store the full sized punctured wheel afterwards. One of the advantages of the externally stored spare wheel, except for the fact that you'd need a engineering degree and overalls to get the damn thing out and replace the punctured one while all the time being shouted at to hurry up!! As Roy Keane might say 'all credit to gender equality'



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,370 ✭✭✭JohnC.


    I've never had to use a spare wheel in my driving life, and my Niro was the first car to not have one. But I bought one to put in the boot, which has a space for it. I'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,218 ✭✭✭...Ghost...


    Have had 2 punctures in as many months. Most recent one was this weekend. Flat on Paddies day with screw in tire. I used the Tesla air compressor I got as a puncture repair kit to inflate the tire before driving to the garage for a patch up. Mean time I had ordered 2 different repair kits, just incase. The repair failed and garage closed on Sunday. I used this kit to temporarily repair the puncture. It worked great, but as it's a screw, I wouldn't leave it in permanently. For permanent repairs, I ordered this kit (the lace type ones). I had the garage redo the repair today and I expect it will hold up fine. I'll do my own repairs going forward however and keep both kits in the boot. Don't use the gunk EVER. It's absolute rubbish and will result in the cost of a new tire.

    Stay Free



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,773 ✭✭✭✭the_amazing_raisin


    Found this video comparing several different tyre plugs

    Actually seems reasonably scientific, insofar as you can be in a shed


    The ribbon type plugs seem to perform best, I guess because the rubber cement actually glues the plug into place

    They do seem to have a bit of a technique though, I'm not sure how well I'd manage in the pouring rain on the side of the road


    I'll probably pick up both the ribbon and mushroom plugs to double my chances, if I need to


    There's also the internal type plugs which seem to provide a more permanent repair

    Of course you need to be able to get the tyre off the rim, so probably not something the average driver can do, let alone on the side of a road

    "The internet never fails to misremember" - Sebastian Ruiz, aka Frost



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,773 ✭✭✭✭the_amazing_raisin


    "The internet never fails to misremember" - Sebastian Ruiz, aka Frost



  • Registered Users Posts: 274 ✭✭the 12 th man


    Newer Nissan Leaf has a spare tyre.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,773 ✭✭✭✭the_amazing_raisin


    Where? There's no space in the boot for one, or did they put a false floor in?

    "The internet never fails to misremember" - Sebastian Ruiz, aka Frost



  • Registered Users Posts: 274 ✭✭the 12 th man




  • Registered Users Posts: 10,773 ✭✭✭✭the_amazing_raisin


    Sounds like the nightmare scenario for @creedp 😁

    Good that they're finally starting to include one at last

    "The internet never fails to misremember" - Sebastian Ruiz, aka Frost



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  • Registered Users Posts: 129 ✭✭pron


    Leaf and MG5 are the only ones I know of with spares, albeit space-savers.

    One of the things on my shopping list, having dealt with numerous major punctures of various flavours over the years, at least three of which wouldn't have been sorted by anything less than a fresh wheel (two were major sidewall tears from sharp kerbs / rocks, one was a brand new tyre that just decided it didn't want to stay on the rim, thankfully in a carpark having lapped the M50 minutes before)

    Other than that, the usual plethora of nails, screws etc. I'll not be overly impressed when my only option is a can of foam and a prayer!



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