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Landcruiser - repair to chassis

  • 17-12-2022 5:39pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 10,552 ✭✭✭✭


    I had an NCT on my 2006 commercial Landcruiser last week and it failed on rust on the rear crossmember of the chassis. This is the beam at the back that the hitch is bolted to.

    I talked to the mechanic at the test centre and he said the rest of the chassis is fine. Raging as the jeep only has 200,000 km on it and otherwise fine. I have it since 2009 and only the wiper drive linkage has gone on it since.

    Has anyone ever got one replaced and what is involved?

    This is the part for sale on Donedeal;

    https://www.donedeal.ie/commercials-for-sale/rear-chassis-crossmember-for-toyota-landcruiser/32538347

    'The Bishops blessed the Blueshirts in Galway, As they sailed beneath the Swastika to Spain'



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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,107 ✭✭✭Tonynewholland


    Some of them like to rust there and on the rear body mounts. You will need to get the new one welded in. How bad was it I wouldn't like it to fail pulling a trailer load of animals



  • Registered Users Posts: 28,766 ✭✭✭✭whelan2


    You have to get it certified. My dad had to get his done and we don't haul cattle with his jeep anymore, it's not cheap



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,315 ✭✭✭jaymla627


    Brother would sort you out if you need it done, does all this type of work for local Toyota dealer, it's a common fault on them simply enough job once all that's gone is the piece your on about, hes looked at jeeps where they aren't repairable when this part failed and was let go to far



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,552 ✭✭✭✭patsy_mccabe


    'The Bishops blessed the Blueshirts in Galway, As they sailed beneath the Swastika to Spain'



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,315 ✭✭✭jaymla627


    Yeah you buy the beam and its welded back in, given the age of your jeep if your keeping it I'd be getting it sand blasted and coated



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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    I had to get my hilux repaired and when I was whingeing about it being only ten years old one of the mechanics on the job said to me '' If you didn't want rust why did you buy a toyota''



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 1,861 Mod ✭✭✭✭Albert Johnson


    That seems to be a common problem on landcruisers of that era. If you were otherwise happy with the jeep and it's in good nick then I'd get someone capable to do a good job on welding in a replacement. You'll not buy much in a newer cruiser for sub €20k atm and there should be year's left in you're current jeep at that milage and condition. I'd consider myself blessed if I had a vehicle for 13 years and hadn't to do much with it apart from servicing and consumables. You could buy another yolk that would break you're heart every day of the week and cost a fortune to jeep going.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,151 ✭✭✭orm0nd


    maybe a bit far from you, but there's a guy in north tipp that specializes in that work, does a lot of work for toyota dealers ,

    i saw a 04 lc that he done and tbh you have to look carefully to find the repair



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,629 ✭✭✭amacca


    Agree....I was that soldier


    I'd have had a couple of all inclusive luxury holidays for what one thing cost me in cash...not to mention frustration and stress!


    Then again if you divided the cost by the number of years I had it for, it wasn't outlandish....just the constant apprehension something else was about to go made me eventually give up and say bye bye



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,055 ✭✭✭Grueller


    I run a 16 soon to be 17 Yr old jeep. I had a €1300 spend on the doe 2 yrs ago. I justified it by saying it would be less than half a yrs payments on a fresh jeep. I spent exactly zero and got through this year again. I am now in the territory where I don't worry if she blows up now because she is only one big bill away from West Cork 4x4 breakers.



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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 1,861 Mod ✭✭✭✭Albert Johnson


    I've been there too and I learned that the dearest yolk you can have is a bad one. Something new went wrong every week and as you said the frustration and stress of it all before you mention the financial cost of it. In the end I was afraid to go down the road in it for fear of what would go wrong today. I could have had a grand jeep at the time between what it cost to buy, what I spent on it to keep it going and having to give up in the finish and buy another jeep.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,203 ✭✭✭FintanMcluskey


    Toyota's problem from that era is that they built the best jeeps on the market.

    The running gear and engines will outlast all competitors but naturally the chassis will start to decay over time.

    The only reason Toyota have a name for rust is because most other brands 4x4 of that age will have long been taken off the road before rust can become a problem.

    Exception being the Pathfinders of course, all of which literally split in 2 due to rust



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,055 ✭✭✭Grueller


    I would disagree with that. Wranglers hilux was shy of 10 years old when she failed a test on rust iirc. I see a friend with a 20 Yr old navara (and plenty others too), I have a 17 Yr old dmax(again loads more of them about) and there are tonnes of L200s from 15-20 yrs old about here. The hilux is no better or worse than any of them imo, bar the 06- Navara/pathfinder which was a ball of sh1te.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    there's some difference in hilux. a friend has an imported 2011 hilux with no rust that's done near 400000kms, yet there's a 2014 hilux with rust issues.

    Go to nay rust repair places and hilux's are in the majority, it's just not good enough



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 1,861 Mod ✭✭✭✭Albert Johnson


    I concur, I wouldn't be impressed with a 10 year old jeep needing repairs for rust regardless of the badge on the end of the bonnet. I sold a 08 Ford Ranger recently that had rust on the rear tub and the body work but the chassis was untouched and in good condition relative to it's age. I would regard Ford as more prone to rust but I'd be hugely disappointed if it was needing chassis repairs 5 year's earlier.

    There's plenty of 15-20 year old jeeps in daily service around here too of all makes. There's several older Navara's too, they seemed to be a decent jeep until they changed to the newer body shape in the early 2000's. As for the Dmax the older shape one's from circa 2005 seem to be almost indestructible.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,977 ✭✭✭jmreire


    Which jeep was it? Personally I'd be a Toyota Landcruiser (in all of its guises) man. With Toyota Landcruiser's, the complete chassis cabin be removed from the body, as its a bolt-on structure. Replacing the rear chassis reinforcement box, is fairly straight forward job in-situ. A few hours removing and cleaning / preparing the area and the replacement box should fit right in. Then an hour or so with a MIG welder, and job done. All remains is to rust-proof the new new box section and adjoining chassis box section. Of course, you could go the full hog, remove the complete chassis, sand blast it, and then rust proof it.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,552 ✭✭✭✭patsy_mccabe


    Why don't they just galvanise the bloody chassis from day one? They'd keep going for ever then.

    'The Bishops blessed the Blueshirts in Galway, As they sailed beneath the Swastika to Spain'



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,107 ✭✭✭Tonynewholland


    For some reason they don't even stone chip jeeps As far as I know all cars and vans are done



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 1,861 Mod ✭✭✭✭Albert Johnson


    Believe it or not a Toyota Landcruiser, a 02 model. I've forgotten or my mind has blanked out half the things that went wrong with it but I remember the diesel lift pump giving up, clutch master cylinder and various other bits and pieces. There was no week that it didn't let me down for the 18 months I owned it and it cost me a fortune. The final straw was that it used to die out going along the road and wouldn't restart until it had cooled down. Several different lads looked at it and couldn't discern what the problem was. I'd have had a new jeep eventually with all the new parts that went onto it.

    I was fully pissed off with at that stage and sold it to an fella that exports jeeps. Tbh I never was as happy to see the back of anything in all my life. I bought a 08 Ford Ranger that never gave a minute's bother afterwards. I was probably just unlucky but that was my experience.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,345 ✭✭✭Jb1989




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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,977 ✭✭✭jmreire


    That was some litany of faults, for one car for sure!!! And you had the misfortune to get the " Monday morning one" And while they still have not managed to build 100% trouble / fault free veh's (all manufacturers), some makes are definitely better than others, and I class Toyota as being up amongst the the best in the reliability stakes. Most likely, you are not alone in your experiences with Toyota either, and maybe we will see some more posts on the subject? Personally though, all of my Toyota experience has been good. The ones I was driving ( since the early 90's) were always serviced on time, and according to the book. I never had one refuse anything I asked it to do. But others will have had different experiences with them, as you can attest.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 1,861 Mod ✭✭✭✭Albert Johnson


    A 16 reg Isuzu Dmax 2.5 litre. I only have it 6 weeks so early days but I'm impressed with it so far.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,977 ✭✭✭jmreire


    Yes, its a good question, and least here in Ireland with the damp climate we have. If I ( or anyone else) was buying a brand new Toyota Land Cruiser, and intending to drive it to the end of its days, and getting the maximum mileage / life out of it, even before the plates would be put on it, I'd have it completely rust proofed again, all the box sections pressure coated with top sealant / rust proofing. There's a system where rust proofing liquid wax is forced at pressure through narrow plastic tubing, which is fitted with a special jet at it's tip ( similar to the ones you see on a drain jetter) and this puts a coating on every nook and cranny within the box sections..It can be injected into all hollow spaces in doors, sill's etc.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,977 ✭✭✭jmreire


    Very easy to check if it has stone chip protection ( called Anti-Peck) or not, if it has it, the bottom 12 " or so will have an orange peel "roughness" in the finish.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,553 Mod ✭✭✭✭blue5000


    Another victim to Toyota rusty chassis here too. Everything else is perfect on it. Plan is to take the body off the chassis next summer when the sheds are empty and weld the chassis. Can't complain though as it's 25 years old and still tipping around the farm off road.

    The Mitsibushi pajero that replaced it won't last 25 years from what I can see so far, needs a good paint job underneath next summer too.

    Patsy you will have to get the weld certified by an engineer, as Whelan says above. You might as well paint it all underneath as well. I used Owatrol followed by rustoleum black chassis paint mixed with 25% owatrol for the second coat. Haven't waxed inside the chassis yet though. Unfortunately the rusty chassis is the LC's Achilles heel.

    There's a group on FB in the states taking Toyota to court over the rust in FJ 80(?) cruisers over there.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/632711680558455

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 1,861 Mod ✭✭✭✭Albert Johnson


    Look into any mart yard and see the amount of Landcruiser's and Hilux's present so obviously there doing the business in the majority of cases. As I said I was probably just unlucky but it opened my eyes and made me aware that there's plenty of other manufacturers outside of Toyota. I'd be mindful of keeping a vehicle serviced and doing any maintenance required so I expect reliability in return. I wouldn't rule out buying another Toyota in the future but I'm happy with my vehicle choices since the last lemon.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,895 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    Know someone who got a new DMax recently and it was undersealed before delivery. As above a galvanised chassis or equivalent out of the factory should be standard - for all vehicles.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    I heard somewhere that Harris's undersealed all the new Isuzus themselves when new.

    You don't hear of them having many issues with rust anyway



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,629 ✭✭✭amacca


    Don't know who is responsible but neighbour has one with a "tuff kote dinol" sticker on it


    Says its rust proofing fir chassis and body etc



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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,977 ✭✭✭jmreire


    Put any new vehicle up on a lift, and you will find that it has been sealed. It varies by manufacturer, but for example, with BMW, since 2004 all BMW's are covered for 12 years. Other makes have different schedules. Some manufacturers ( Audi A6 /C5 ) had zinc plated panels. Different manufacturers use different anti-corrosion methods. Most vehicles undergo dipping procedures while on the production line, where the shell is submerged in a pool of rust protection liquid, and this is done in several stages before it goes to the paint shop.



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