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Beef Grazing 2022

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  • 22-01-2022 7:58pm
    #1
    Administrators Posts: 364 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭


    This discussion was created from comments split from: Beef price tracker 2.


«13

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 3,193 ✭✭✭Good loser


    Letting some cattle out to grass shortly. Which should be let out first: Her hfrs; AA hfrs; P grade Frs; better Frs? Frs are bullocks.

    All in fair order.



  • Registered Users Posts: 18,396 ✭✭✭✭Bass Reeves


    My own inclination would be the FR first. The AA/HE will bomb away when you let them out and have a limited frame. Fr's will carry weight.

    Only proviso is when you want to hang the AA/HE, if you want to slaughter them in May/ June I let them out first.

    Slava Ukrainii



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,590 ✭✭✭Cavanjack


    I’d be letting the worst/hungriest out first or whatever you want finished first. Are they getting meal?

    There'll be no talk like that around here for 6-8 weeks.



  • Registered Users Posts: 18,396 ✭✭✭✭Bass Reeves


    Grass has remained growing around here. Great covers on places closed since mid October. 1 or 2 colder paddocks are surprisingly me.

    I have three bullocks outside for various reasons. I will definitely move them to a strong paddock as opposed to feeding silage. Will be slow to let off before early March. But may be tempted to let off 8-10 strong Friesian in 2-3 weeks time

    Slava Ukrainii



  • Registered Users Posts: 583 ✭✭✭Fine Day


    Only 20th of January yet. Could get anything between now and April. We will hardly be so lucky to avoid it.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,669 ✭✭✭✭Danzy


    Last few years March, April and early May have often been bad enough for cattle out and desperate for grass.


    If it was 2 degrees and a steady easterly on April 1st or 20 degrees you couldn't be surprised either way.



  • Registered Users Posts: 18,396 ✭✭✭✭Bass Reeves


    You cod but the grass is there at present. It's all about being able to graze it now. I always prefer to see a wet December, January or even February. It has been exceptionally mild. Growth has been exceptional it's a matter of managing it now.

    Slava Ukrainii



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,669 ✭✭✭✭Danzy


    If you can graze now, take the opportunity,



  • Registered Users Posts: 583 ✭✭✭Fine Day


    In my opinion you be mad to let cattle out to grass. Takes weeks for cattle to settle and thrive in the shed after putting them in at the start of the winter. One wet night and the land would be in scutter. You have to put the cattle back in and start all over again. Also your land will suffer due to the damage. If you have fodder leave them in. No point in spending loads of money on sheds to leave idle. Land needs are rest too.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,269 ✭✭✭Dunedin


    The only way I’d let cattle out now would be if it was field right beside the shed and they could go in and out for a bit of silage too (which they will btw). At least then if the weather changes then it’s easy get them back in without upsetting them too much. Not too many systems would be able to do this though.

    it’s all grand letting them out but weather changes very quickly at this time of year and most ground is still soft enough (walked mine this evening and wouldn’t like to be letting out much on it).

    @Bass. Don’t forget that 90% of beef farmers are part time so the ability to drop everything at work to go home to get in cattle is not always an option - dark going to work and dark coming home.

    not a runner for at least a month in my view.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,316 ✭✭✭Anto_Meath


    The only thing I would be letting out yet would be the odd lad with sore or tender feet or that slats ain't agreeing with & again it would be close to the yard where they could get a grain of meal.



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,669 ✭✭✭✭Danzy


    I've let them out in January at times but in at the evening.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,193 ✭✭✭Good loser


    Those are the two extremes worst v. finished first. I will let 4 of each kind out tomorrow. On about 3 lbs meal and fair silage.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,111 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    Not every drystock farm has all land around sheds, one of my tenants grazes my land hard late feb early march, I believe he destroys it for the year but that's not my problem



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,745 ✭✭✭Jjameson


    Long grass is better grazed before March frosts. Light small cattle are the best bet in that they have the best chance of staying out and won’t be a big loss in performance I’d have to come back in but bar that do your hard pressed sheep farming neighbours a turn and turn the wig of winter growth Into lovely pelleted fertiliser on the ground ready to fuel the fresh spring growth)



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,269 ✭✭✭Dunedin


    Don’t disagree about the long grass eaten in March but in a lot of cases the land is too soft for even light grazers. Takes a long time to recover if poached in spring.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,736 ✭✭✭mr.stonewall


    Flexibility is key at the shoulders. I'm on heavy ground with pockets if dry. Yesterday I turned out 30 yearling heifers. If they have to come in due to weather so be it. Currently on paddocks and strip wires up. Getting enough grass for 24-36 hrs. The back fence is vital. Looking at them in the distance and half are lying down. Better of out when the weather plays ball

    The amount of grass grown since November unbelievable. 2yr old cattle will do well to be out by march in a normal year.

    @blue5000 could we transfer posts to a beef grazing 22 thread



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,646 Mod ✭✭✭✭blue5000


    Good idea Mr. S. Posts pulled from beef tracker thread.

    Have to say good fencing is essential for this. This was brought up at a DG during the week, silage can be left in the yard till next year. With costs of making silage going up it will be better than money in the bank. Lighter cattle or cows with small calves at foot should be the priority.

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,590 ✭✭✭Cavanjack


    What feeding is in grass now. The DM of the grass would be poor yet would it not? I’d say cattle would still be better on good silage for another month or 6 weeks.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,736 ✭✭✭mr.stonewall


    Looking at the long term rainfall locally it has been below average each month, since last may. We are due a really wet few weeks at some stage.

    DM wouldn't be too bad, we have had a very dry January overall. Just looked at teagasc Grass 10 newsletter and they had a fig of 14% on the 14th of Jan. Would have crept up another 1-2% easily.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,736 ✭✭✭mr.stonewall


    Fencing is vital, ex dairy farm here with paddocks and roadways. Had the usual wire breaking on the exodus from the sheds. Over the past number of years I have struggle to get ground graze by may, with a priority to graze silage ground.

    The cost of silage will be a huge dent in budgets for the coming year, with fert and rising diesel prices, was shocked the other when the diesel tank had to be filled.

    Everyday of grazing now is a bonus and that's the way I'm viewing it.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,051 ✭✭✭minerleague


    Suckler cows out on " saved pasture " ( as the yanks call it ) strip grazed, have to put in a couple wildish ones closer to calving as hard to manage outside if something goes wrong. Doing this for 4 years now, prefer it to slatted shed, and not dry ground by any means.



  • Registered Users Posts: 64 ✭✭Jim_11


    When did you graze it last before closing, what kind of stocking rate would you have on it



  • Registered Users Posts: 18,396 ✭✭✭✭Bass Reeves


    DM would be climbing fast at present with the dry hard weather. I am getting really worried about rain when it comes. We are sure a drenching.

    Slava Ukrainii



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,051 ✭✭✭minerleague


    End of August, would be stocked fairly low overall here. Cow to the acre roughly should last them 2 months. If weather comes very wet move through quicker, no worries with cold



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,193 ✭✭✭Good loser



    About 5 years ago had a 5 acre plot very badly poached in early April - no green grass and scarcely a square without a deep footprint.

    Stopped and fertilized for silage and rolled 10 days later (about April 20). Excellent crop early June. No long term effects.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,736 ✭✭✭mr.stonewall


    N released from the min till method. Something to consider.


    Let out a other batch of yearlings today. Cattle are very settled out and content. I know I will have to pull them back in when the weather turns a after all this dry weather



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,669 ✭✭✭✭Danzy


    Depends on the land I'd say. I've seen fields to be set back for the year



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,936 ✭✭✭I says


    Won’t be out here till after paddy’s day. I’ll graze the silage ground first something I haven’t done in years.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 849 ✭✭✭Easten


    Very conscious of the fertilizer price at the moment. I've silage fields ready to be grazed but am thinking that a light shake of fertilizer will see it fit for cutting very early rather than grazing it down. I must check the weather forecast, if we are in for a dry spell I think I'll graze them.



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