Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
Private profiles - please note that profiles marked as private will soon be public. This will facilitate moderation so mods can view users' warning histories. All of your posts across the site will appear on your profile page (including PI, RI). Groups posts will remain private except to users who have access to the same Groups as you. Thread here
Some important site news, please read here. Thanks!

Census job interview

  • 05-01-2022 1:15pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 673 ✭✭✭ redmgar


    Hi, has anyone experience of the interview for the Census Enumerator position.

    If so, is it a competency based interview and what are the competencies.



«134

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,811 ✭✭✭ billyhead


    I remember for the 2016 interview it was more a general chit chat about the work history, education, availability to do the job, dealing with customers etc. They asked about dealing with difficult people and what you would do if they refused to take or complete the form. I can't recall any other probing questions.



  • Registered Users Posts: 673 ✭✭✭ redmgar


    Cheers, I am guessing that if people refuse to complete the form you just be polite and move on to the next house?



  • Registered Users Posts: 339 ✭✭ Wonderstruck


    No - you get that form filled out - don't be passive. Most non-filler-outers just don't answer the door so you can just keep plugging away until they cave. Most refusing to fill it out people actually do fill it out in my experience - even just to rid themselves of you bugging them with constantly! Use some example of how you made a hard sell in a job before.

    If I went into further detail expect this will be deleted due to the no enumerators posting pinned post. The interview involves reading a map so definitely learn how to read a map properly. It was so long ago I don't recall much about the interview, just sound enthusiastic and not flaky and you should be fine. Most of the job is just being determined and having good planning to be honest. If you can show that at interview you'll be fine. :)



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,811 ✭✭✭ billyhead


    As above. You don't just give up. You have to try and persuade them to complete it. Be assertive. Outline the reasons why a census is important in framing policy decisions in the area i.e. assists the government in deciding where infrastructure, schools, hospitals are needed etc. There's a fine and possible imprisonment for not completing it so you will have to tell the householder of this aswell.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 673 ✭✭✭ redmgar


    How many hours are required and over what time period. I am trying to figure out if it is worth the time as it will be on top of my regular job.



  • Registered Users Posts: 307 ✭✭ Bicyclette


    The number of hours you do really depends on where you are allocated. Some places appear to be straightforward but others are very difficult. You should really be calling to places at different times of the day if you don't get a response the first time: Morning, afternoon and evening. Census Day 2016 was the 24th April. We were certainly working in March, possibly straight after St Patricks Day. And it finally finished at the end of May. There were days when I was doing 6 hours or so. Sometimes I would be in my location at 10.30am going around to houses. I would go home for a bit and be back there that evening, often up to 9pm. And even in between you'd often be getting calls from people in your area, because you are given a Census phone and telephone number. People would sometimes ask you to call to their house at a specific time. But things will be a lot different this year because of Covid. Lots of people are still working at home. Would I have been able to do it if I was working full-time? No, I don't think so. I was studying part-time at the time and had to miss some lectures because of it and even one day went straight from an exam to my area.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,811 ✭✭✭ billyhead


    You definitely earn your salary. You need to be flexible i.e possibly call unexpectedly to a house on a Sunday to collect or deliver a form. Apartment blocks are a nightmare. I had one of those and you had to use an intercom system and I wasted a lot of time going back and forth. You could get lucky doing it and have no problematic householders that cooperate fully and you could have some that don't. I did in my case and it took a lot of persuasion to get the form completed. I found it physically enjoyable because I didn't use a car and cycled and walked during the employment. I was working full time aswell and would cycle home from work (a 13km each way commute) and then out the door in the evenings for a few hours finishing around 9pm.



  • Registered Users Posts: 307 ✭✭ Bicyclette


    I had several apartment blocks and they were very difficult. This is where networking with residents came in handy. If you got into the complexes, you could go from door to door. Sometimes you may need to get a younger person to translate what you are saying from English into the language of the family. I also had people, who for various cultural reasons, were uncomfortable filling in the forms. My field supervisor was fabulous in this regard, using contacts to get buy in from certain people or access to apartment complexes from others. Networking with your own team and even others was so important.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,811 ✭✭✭ billyhead


    I can't recall experiencing language issues because English was the second language of foreigners in my EA. They were mostly Eastern European. The only problems I had was an anti government brigade who were refusing to fill it out. Water charges were being proposed at the time and anger over this new measure was taken out on me because I was employed by the Civil Service.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 4,738 ✭✭✭ SouthWesterly


    The weather was good that year.

    Had one who refused all attempts.

    I was able to fill out the mandatory parts on his behalf from what I knew about the area.



  • Registered Users Posts: 339 ✭✭ Wonderstruck


    Weather could be good in 2022! Yeah obviously some people are conspiracy theorists etc but I don't think saying you've give up on the first shot is the first thing to say in an interview. A lot of people think it's some sort of voluntary thing like a private company survey when you're like "no it's not" they're like "grand"!

    I agree flats are a nightmare, a quarter of my area was flats and it took twice to three times as long as the rest of it! Just gotta be methodical with them, and shout out to all the people who let me in over and over again to collect those forms :)

    I also agree your area impacts your hours - I had colleagues who had a lot of working people out of the house all day, while I had a lot of students / retired people so I often worked during the day as it gave me more hours of daylight (I wouldn't work after sundown), who knows now with WFH who will be in during the day.

    I think it would be rough enough with a full time 9-5 regular job, as you'd have to be really pulling those extra hours at the weekend to catch up and sometimes weekends were a waste of time (people going away all weekend or working all weekend). You'd also have less flexibility, e.g. stay at home when it's raining or just want a day off - as you couldn't work during the day as easily so you're a bit chasing your own tail to get it done in time. I had a colleague who had a full time job and she was too exhuasted to finish the work the end. I had a second part time job for 2 weeks of the few months and I had a colleague who was a student and it really suited her.

    I enjoyed the job and would do it again because I work full time now and I don't think I'd have the time and energy.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2 Amy81


    Thanks for the replies. It is hard to find much information. I got an interview for the role but am unsure. Is it always your own very local area you are assigned to or would you be assigned where needed within reasonable distance? Also am wondering if you lose a lot in tax . I am only working part time but sounds quite time consuming.



  • Registered Users Posts: 307 ✭✭ Bicyclette


    You won't be allocated your own immediate area. You are assigned somewhere within reasonable distance. Somewhere you are less likely to know people. Tax is all relative. You are only working for a finite amount of time. You can sort all of that via www.myaccount.ie Yes, it is very time consuming and can be relatively poorly paid if you have to put in a lot of hours, as you will only be paid a set amount. Not an hourly amount.

    The positive is, though, that it is fascinating. A really interesting exercise. You get to see a very wide variety of people in a very short space of time. It gives you - or certainly gave me - a completely different perspective on life. One area I was working in was a bit dodgy and I had neighbours keeping an eye out for me. They got to know me by name and if they saw my car, would stand at their doors making sure I was OK. Salt of the earth people that, had I not done the Census, I would never have encountered.

    If you are happy to work flat out for 8-10 weeks, then I think you will find it an extremely rewarding experience.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1 Lovecharactermind


    Does anyone know after your interview how long until you are informed if you were successful for the position



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,031 ✭✭✭ mattser




  • Registered Users Posts: 6,448 ✭✭✭ Alkers


    There is (or was) a pretty comprehensive training session which covers all the above queries regarding forms and difficult people etc so don't worry about that.


    The interview was easy iirc, few map questions, how you will manage time etc and willingness to wear ppe came up for me.


    It's totally luck of the draw how well paid it is as you get the same fee per house and some houses are literally ten times the work of others. Most people I dealt with we're fine but you get the odd few difficult people or who don't understand what the census is.

    You get a much increased amount forms house you discover within your area which isn't on the official list, I had one of these but someone in my team had a whole complex of apartments and.they made a fortune off them, they earned nearly twice what I did at the time (2011)



  • Registered Users Posts: 34 ballyerlas


    Has anyone who did the interview heard back yet?



  • Registered Users Posts: 673 ✭✭✭ redmgar


    They said the first week of feb, got the vetting forwarded yesterday.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,307 ✭✭✭ Bungy Girl




  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 673 ✭✭✭ redmgar


    Has anyone received an offer yet?



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,811 ✭✭✭ billyhead


    Nothing yet anyway. It should be this week though.



  • Registered Users Posts: 34 ballyerlas


    Hopefully we will hear today



  • Registered Users Posts: 34 ballyerlas





  • Registered Users Posts: 7,811 ✭✭✭ billyhead




  • Registered Users Posts: 64 ✭✭ Anniesland


    Confirmation that placed on panel just arrived.



  • Registered Users Posts: 34 ballyerlas




  • Registered Users Posts: 108 ✭✭ MunsterM




  • Registered Users Posts: 489 ✭✭ CiboC




  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 673 ✭✭✭ redmgar


    I wonder if placed on the panel means that you deffo got it or will a certain number be placed from the panel.



Advertisement