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Advice on new bike

  • 24-12-2021 5:11pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 35 stones81


    Hi looking at new bike it's between a cube attain sl aluminum for 1650 or cube attain gtc carbon for 2300

    never had a carbon bike is it worth the price difference



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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,438 ✭✭✭ rolling boh


    i enquired about a cube attain last week and was told it would be in next november .



  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 43,443 Mod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    never had a carbon bike is it worth the price difference

    heart:first thought, if you can afford it, get the better bike, you're more likely to enjoy it and use it.

    head: how much use is the bike likely to get, and what sort of use? i.e. if you were planning on doing say 50km a week on it, i'd say the extra €650 could be better spent...



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,182 ✭✭✭ DaveyDave


    Carbon is night and day, absolutely worth it in my opinion. If you can afford it that is. Definitely noticeable comfort difference over aluminium.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,910 ✭✭✭ beggars_bush


    My advice, borrow a carbon bike and try it out for a few spins

    I'd always put a new(er) bike as a goal 3/4 months down the line. I set training goals and saving goals and work towards it. Feels like you've really earned it



  • Registered Users Posts: 623 ✭✭✭ nicksnikita


    I’d disagree. In my experience, Alu bikes can be equally comfortable



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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,814 ✭✭✭ CantGetNoSleep


    What are you upgrading from, and to what is the spec of the upgrade?

    I've an alu Cube Attain and I love it, very comfortable bike. But it is 10-speed Tiagra and I picked it up second hand but almost unused for 450.



  • Registered Users Posts: 457 ✭✭ Elvis Hammond


    Carbon is far stiffer for a given mass. Comfort shouldn't be affected by frame material, as there's no real give in the triangles.

    Lighter weight &/or greater stiffness is what you're after with carbon.



  • Registered Users Posts: 35 stones81


    Thanks for the advice lads I have a giant ar1 2020 at the moment nothing wrong with it but bit on the heavy side I can do the bike to work again in January so thats why changing bikes I have the attain sl on hold for me was told the gtc would be in late Jan early Feb as I'm in no rush I don't mind waiting for it



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,182 ✭✭✭ DaveyDave


    The carbon Attain is a kilo lighter than the aluminium one you're looking at, according to their website. If you're looking for something lighter then that one should do.



  • Registered Users Posts: 457 ✭✭ Elvis Hammond



    At least half that weight saving seems to be in components, as the 105 'race' version of the GTC is quoted at only 300 grammes lighter. (And 400 quid easier on the pocket than SL/Ultegra.)

    Should be stiffer than the aluminium frame, if that's an attraction.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,847 ✭✭✭ MojoMaker


    Aluminium all the way. But a good one, not a cheap one. Same for carbon if you go for it - 2300 is going to get you a very cheap carbon composition and in that case I'd go Alu much quicker.



  • Registered Users Posts: 457 ✭✭ Elvis Hammond



    What exactly is 'a very cheap carbon composition'? Something that's actually dangerous?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,438 ✭✭✭ rolling boh


    Would have thought a bike over 2k would be decent enough unless you are comparing it to the really high end ones that most will never own .I own a couple of cube bikes I found the attain a pretty good bike and have done a lot of miles it depends on how much you would use it what kind of distances you regularly do the more expensive bike will be better on the longer trips but for regular short runs the cheaper one will be fine . The better bike will cost a bit more to maintain as well.



  • Moderators, Politics Moderators Posts: 33,794 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Seth Brundle


    My carbon bike was 1700 three years ago so would be about 2300 now. It has put up with nearly 30,000kms of use in all weather.

    But despite 105 components wearing out, the frame is still perfect.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,182 ✭✭✭ DaveyDave


    Just because something is entry level doesn't mean it isn't a quality product. Very cheap carbon is the likes of Seva or any other Chinese special. We're talking about Cube here. If my budget, entry level €1,500 2017 Canyon Endurace CF7 has held up with a rider over 100kg I think it will be fine.

    Elvis Hammond has a good point with the GTC Race, 105 is a great groupset and it's still a light bike but you'll have €400 in the pocket. If you want you could use that towards nicer wheels to save weight (can't find much info about those Cube wheels on the €2,000+ model)



  • Registered Users Posts: 35 stones81


    Last night I decided I'd go for the carbon now think aluminium and spend the extra money on new wheels think I'll try find the gtc somewhere so I can least have a look at it and then compare lucky enough I don't have till January thanks for all the advice lads



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,591 ✭✭✭ dancinpants


    Not all aluminium is made equally. I would challenge anyone to ride a CAAd 12 or 13 and try to tell me they are not a smoother, more comfortable ride than the vast majority of entry level carbon fibre frames. Well engineered aluminium delivers a great ride quality.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,591 ✭✭✭ dancinpants


    Your biggest issue will be the stock wheels. I have the SL (aluminium - think I paid 1,100e two in 2018) as my winter bike and the stock wheels that came with it are comically crap. The tyres are also awful. You are looking at a complete upgrade. I had broken spokes and multiple punctures on the stock ones and the tyres were impossible to replace.

    If I were you, I'd go for the Aluminium and look for a good set of wheels. 2,300e is very cheap for carbon and I would be avoiding it as it really is the bottom end. Saying carbon is better than aluminium is way too binary an idea, as it all comes down to the engineering of the material, and well engineered aluminium beats poor carbon all day long.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,279 ✭✭✭ at1withmyself


    Good choice, never mind the comments here as 95% of us (me included) wouldn't notice a difference what frame we're on and Cube are a good reliable brand so I wouldn't label there carbon bikes low end. All the talk of compliance and feel of certain frames is all marketing, as Sean Kelly said the best bike is the one his sponsor is paying for 🙂

    Enjoy the new ride.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,591 ✭✭✭ dancinpants


    I think he's decided on Aluminium, which is what most have suggested. The rest of your post is dubious at best. Technology has advanced hugely since Kelly made those comments, and he never raced a carbon fibre frame. Huge difference between cheap aluminium and high end aluminium, and the same can be said for carbon fibre.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,847 ✭✭✭ MojoMaker


    Low end heavy (relative of course) carbon composite frames are a marketing dream. Queues of Mamils out the door conditioned to think only carbon will do for their next bike, when it's well worth taking the time to research thoroughly and look at all the options.

    Not saying anything wrong with the like of Cube or Giant or any of the low-end mass-produced carbon moulds - perfectly good from a longevity and safety perspective, it's more the mindset of "it must be carbon" I'd challenge as it's a bit lazy.



  • Registered Users Posts: 457 ✭✭ Elvis Hammond


    OP already has a decent looking, no more than 2 year old aluminium bike. I know they didn't come here to have their motivations questioned but I'd still wonder what target they have in mind with the change. ( I know weight & BTW availability were mentioned.)

    I also think this thing about ride quality in a diamond frame is all in peoples' heads.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,182 ✭✭✭ DaveyDave


    I think it's really worth considering if you want to buy another aluminium bike when you already have a decent aluminium bike. Why not just throw a set of wheels on the current bike rather than buying another similar bike and throwing wheels on that?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,438 ✭✭✭ rolling boh


    could you op tell us how much cycling you do on average per week or whatever might give some ideas the above post ref wheels might be a decent option .



  • Registered Users Posts: 35 stones81


    Main reason for new bike is I want something bit lighter and I can do the bike the work if I couldn't do that I wouldn't be getting a new bike cycling wise I do 60/70k at the weekend and a few 100k sportive + I did take a aluminium cube for bit of a test spin and it felt alot more comfortable straight away



  • Registered Users Posts: 35 stones81




  • Registered Users Posts: 1,205 ✭✭✭ boredatwork82


    Buy the fancier bike. For no other reason than its fancier 😂 and you have the bike to work.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,279 ✭✭✭ at1withmyself


    Which ever they go with the point remains the same and most people couldn't tell the difference what the ride, it's all marketing BS about ride quality.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,591 ✭✭✭ dancinpants



    That's simply not true. Have you ridden different quality bikes - an entry level aluminium v high end for example or an entry level carbon v a high end carbon bike? I swapped by Cube Attain SL as above for a CAAD 13 recently for my winter bike and the difference is night and day. The CAAD is so much smoother and faster.

    With Carbon fibre, you do get to diminishing returns and I agree that people pay huge money for bikes they don't need, and couldn't tell the difference from a cheaper model. But that's at the higher end.



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  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 43,443 Mod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    I also think this thing about ride quality in a diamond frame is all in peoples' heads.

    i don't know why people bother upgrading wheels, sure they're all round.

    (that was intended as lighthearted, don't @ me, as i think the cool kids say)



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