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Velux Planning Permission

  • 14-10-2021 1:35pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,843 ✭✭✭ techdiver


    Hi,

    In the process of getting my attic converted (properly, with appropriate steel supports and fire compliance all to be signed off on by an engineer) and was wondering what are the chances of getting planning permission for a small Velux (over the stairs) at the front of the house? I live in a standard estate. I'm not sure the reasoning behind exemption for installing a velux on the rear but not the front? Can anyone answer that one? Is this an aesthetic thing?

    Failing that I have seen one or two homes in the estate who have velux windows on the front. I'm assuming as long as no one objects and you are not looking to sell the house you could "gamble" on doing one without permission? Probably not going to do it at the moment but is something I wondering about of the existing stairwell and new one are too dark. The nature of the project means that the stairwell won't reach the space at the rear of the house to avail of direct light from a velux.



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Comments

  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,385 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    Planning is required. Have you checked if the other houses made applications for theirs?

    You could consider a pre planning meeting with the local planner to discuss this. It's a free service and generally the planner will indicate how they would view a formal application. Details of pre planning meetings can be found on your local Councils website.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,843 ✭✭✭ techdiver


    Thanks for the reply. Thought as much. Since I wont be doing it immediately (it's only a contingency plan) I'll let the dust settle on the development and see how we feel.



  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,385 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    I wouldnt see any great problem with getting permission for a small Velux. However its best to check it out in detail.



  • Registered Users Posts: 43 doug82


    The velux to the rear is one of those non-sensical planning ‘rules’ that has become accepted over the years. In fact there is no exemption that specifically covers rooflights, unlike for example solar panels. Roof lights fall under a general exemption that allows changes to the exterior of a dwelling provided the changes are consistent with the character of the dwelling and neighbouring dwellings. That’s quite subjective, so to avoid risk, they are generally considered acceptable to the rear. There are a few houses in my own estate that put a roof light to the front without seeking permission. At worst they might have to seek retention if selling.



  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,385 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    Quote = At worst they might have to seek retention if selling.

    No, at worst they may have to reinstate the roof or face enforcement action.



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  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 16,109 Mod ✭✭✭✭ DOCARCH


    +1. I would not make the assumption that planning permission or retention permission will be granted for roof windows to the front. I have applied for planning permission for roof windows to the front of houses in the past and have had planning permission refused!



  • Registered Users Posts: 43 doug82


    With planning it’s important to give a balanced view. We’ve all had rubbish decisions, but they shouldn’t set the bar. A small roof light serving a landing is highly unlikely to become an issue. Nothing is risk free, but it’s clear from the original post that there is an awareness of that. They asked for reasoning behind this particular exemption. I don’t think “planning is required” is particularly helpful without context.



  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,385 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    Quote = I don’t think “planning is required” is particularly helpful without context

    What context would that be?



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 16,109 Mod ✭✭✭✭ DOCARCH


    For balance....

    I have applied for planning permission for roof windows to the front of houses in the past and have had planning permission granted!



  • Registered Users Posts: 43 doug82


    As I said, the poster was asking about the reasoning behind roof lights being considered exempt at rear but not at front. I gave context. Like many aspects of planning, it’s not clear-cut. In some situations ABP has declared roof lights at the front to be exempt. Similarly a rear rooflight could be very visible to the public domain and be considered not exempt. Context



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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,288 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    15 years ago, Velux to the front was a big no no and I advised not to include them as the planners didn’t grant them generally.


    nowadays, the current generation of planners are ok with them. In the last few years, I’ve had all but one granted that had Velux to the front in Dublin.


    the weird one was in fingal. 2 houses within the same estate. One granted with Velux to front and one conditioned to remove them. That’s currently at a-peak stage with ABP though.



  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,385 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    Thanks. But the OP was talking about a Velux on the front of the roof. Aesthetics would be the reason alright



  • Registered Users Posts: 43 doug82




  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,288 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    ABP decision in this morning. Agreed with our appeal and instructed the LA to remove the condition that removed the 2 Velux from the front elevation. Great news.



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,518 ✭✭✭✭ Poor Uncle Tom


    As an aside:


    Away from the office ATM, does anyone have a quick reference to the old ABP case allowing roof windows to the rear of a roof surface as exempted development?



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,518 ✭✭✭✭ Poor Uncle Tom


    Thank you D.

    Just keeping my mind active while away from my AI brain. It's a case of 'when you know something', but you need backup. :)



  • Registered Users Posts: 5 JamTeber



    Hi Muffler,

    Any chance you could repost, or post in another form, the 3rd link on attic conversion - its not opening. Thanks



  • Registered Users Posts: 689 ✭✭✭ raxy


    Just out of curiosity, how much would it cost to get planning permission to put velux to the front of the house? I've read on other posts you need to get drawings done etc. Anyone who has gone through with it what did it cost? I'm assuming it doesn't matter on the number of windows?



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,288 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    Depends on where you are and who you use and if you can get someone at the moment.

    Newspaper ad, OSi maps, printing etc

    Could be circa €1500 all in for a small independent person to do the job including costs and fees.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 585 ✭✭✭ C. Eastwood


    If you can get a qualified Construction Professional in Private Practice with Professional Indemnity Insurance to do Planning Permission for a Velux for €1,500 — please please pass their details on to me. 😂😂😂😂



  • Registered Users Posts: 30,325 ✭✭✭✭ Penn


    Gumbo said €1,500 for a small independent person to do it. You don't have to be in private practice with insurance for something like this. Anyone can submit a planning permission, it's just best to have someone who has experience or knowledge of planning, drawings, information required etc.



  • Registered Users Posts: 585 ✭✭✭ C. Eastwood


    Your getting your Attic converted.

    Do not allow any Builder to decide on the Specification is Works.

    You are going to spend a substantial amount of money and therefore you need a Construction Professional to design the Specification of Works, and detail Drawings of the Attic Design.



  • Registered Users Posts: 30,325 ✭✭✭✭ Penn


    Absolutely 100% agree. The works should be specified, inspected and certified by a competent, experienced and insured professional. But that's not required for planning permission. Unless the proposed velux windows are a complex or very large size, then the planning for standard velux windows could be done by anyone and a registered professional could specify the works required after planning has been granted.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,288 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    We are talking about planning permission here, not the construction stage.

    I stand by my original post.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,288 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo




  • Registered Users Posts: 585 ✭✭✭ C. Eastwood


    Techdiver

    Before you spend any money I recommend that you should seek advice in relation to your proposed Attic development.

    Technical Guidance Document ‘F’ Ventilation (2019) of the Building Regulations requires that - suggested room heights in Attic Living Rooms as shown in the Diagrams-

    If you cannot achieve these suggested heights of habitable rooms (or near enough) - you may find it difficult to get an Engineer to Certify the Attic Development to be in Compliance with the Building Regulations.



  • Registered Users Posts: 585 ✭✭✭ C. Eastwood


    Techdiver

    You could make an application for a Section 5 Declaration of Exemption for your proposed Velux

    I have used this successfully on a number of occasions for Velux Rooflights.

    I attach an Application Form for this for the Cork County Council as an example.

    you can visit your local Authority Planning Dept, or Google it and download the form.

    It is basically an application, requesting the Local Planning Dept to confirm that your proposed Velux - is, or is not, - an Exempt Development.

    You could phone the Planning Dept. Get the name and email of the Local Executive Planner and email them in relation to the proposed Velux. They should be able to confirm if it is appropriate for you to submit a Section 5 Planning Application.



  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,385 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    You dont need approval from the local planner to submit a Section 5 application.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 585 ✭✭✭ C. Eastwood


    Muffler

    I fully understand planning permission. Section 5 Application is for Exempt Development.

    The Planner may tell you that you are waisting your time making a Section 5 Application, because a Velux to the front of the Roof requires Planning Permission.



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