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Are there many benefits to PCP?

  • 07-10-2021 7:25pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 328 ✭✭ DaveByDavid


    Looking to finance a new car soon and was thinking about putting down a decent enough deposit through hire purchase and then paying over 5 years to keep monthly payments down.

    I think I understand how PCP works with the GFMV, but are there any benefits to be considered outside of lower repayments? Because you can only go over 3 years, and in most circumstances don't pay a big deposit I actually find the monthly payments are often the same or a little higher.

    When it comes to the end of the 3 years, if you want to swap to a brand new car, I guess the only slight benefit is if the car is worth more than the GMFV that can go towards new deposit and essentially you can just keep paying a monthly payment and get a new car without too much additional deposit needed? (potentially).

    We can afford the hire purchase payments, but if PCP is an "easier" way to get a new car every 3 years it might be the better option. But also depends on how much hassle it would be to switch to a different brand/dealer? I'm guessing in this case you'd have to just hand car back and pay a brand new deposit to new dealer.



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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 152 ✭✭ bikedude
    Registered User


    I had a PPC on a Golf, the 0% finance was a good option at the time. Used the 0% finance for 3 years. And at the end just financed the balance for another 3 at a normal rate.

    if you planning to keep the car for 5 years anyway, I would look at PPC if the interest is lower in that option and keep the money invested for 3 years.

    At the end of the PPC you can trade in, for a new one (that’s when the resale value and how much you need to pay comes into play), you can finance the balance, or give the car back and walk away.

    PPC isn’t that bad if you can afford the car in the first place, and might offer a lower interest rate than the HP for a few years.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,028 ✭✭✭ Lantus
    Registered User


    It's very easy credit and if you get the right deal and save like crazy you can pay no interest on the first 3 years and then pay off the next 3 straight away or only finance a smaller sum saving potentially thousands in interest. Break out the calculator and get the total cost worked out, not just your monthly.



  • Registered Users Posts: 328 ✭✭ DaveByDavid


    Thanks @bikedude and @Lantus - I'll speak to the dealer but from the Ioniq 5 page on Hyundai's own website the APR is 5.9% with PCP and HP which doesn't make a huge amount of sense to me as with same deposit the payments are almost identical anyway.

    Only thing with HP is you could go 4-5 years instead of just 3 if you wanted.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,893 ✭✭✭ Shedite27
    Registered User


    5.9% is high. I guess the balloon payment that you're deferring for 3 years is basically interest free, you aren't accruing interest on that over the first few years.

    Everyone needs to do the maths on their own circumstances. It worked for me getting a larger than normal trade in on my old car, and got to park a third of the price for 3 years



  • Registered Users Posts: 17,959 ✭✭✭✭ Cyrus
    Registered User


    no you pay interest on the balloon as well, its part of the total amount borrowed. which is why low apr deals are great, high APR not so much.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,893 ✭✭✭ Shedite27
    Registered User


    Well I know what you're saying, it's baked into the overall price, but from my perspective, I agreed in 2017 what I would have to pay in 2020, and that amount stayed static for 3 years (no interest accrued)



  • Registered Users Posts: 17,959 ✭✭✭✭ Cyrus
    Registered User


    but a portion of your monthly payment includes interest on this amount.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,028 ✭✭✭ Lantus
    Registered User


    So a bigger deposit will get slightly less interest. I would use the lower pcp payments to put aside extra to pay off loan or as much as possible for the settlement at year 4. The car price is the same it's the interest you need to work out on the total repayment as if you are buying outright comparing HP to pcp.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,893 ✭✭✭ Shedite27
    Registered User


    That's like saying paying your Gas/Electricity bill a month in arrears includes interest.

    Once you agree the final payment on day 1, that stays the same for 3 years. Doesn't grow.

    Like I said, everyone can do theri own maths and see what works out cheapest for them



  • Registered Users Posts: 50,148 ✭✭✭✭ bazz26
    Registered User


    You don't get to agree the final payment on day 1. It is determined in advance by the manufacturer and while that final figure doesn't change, the interest on it is factored into the monthly payments for the first 3 years up to the date that final payment is due. Obviously if you get PCP at 0% then there is no interest.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,492 ✭✭✭ joebloggs32
    Registered User



    Spot on.

    You pay a deposit, max is ususlly 1/3 of the purchase price. Then the pcp is worked out based on a final payment otherwise known as the GMFV (again usually about 1/3) and then the monthly payments. The GMFV will however go up or down slightly based on the annual mileage you forecast at the outset. Its all fixed in at the start. You can see exactly what you are paying and the APR is included in your contracts.

    I have done it a couple of times. I always save for the final payment so when the contract is ending i can buy it for cash if i want. This can be a little bargaining chip too as when it comes to the end of the 3 years the salesman wants you to roll over on to a new contract. A lot of people are trapped somewhat as they haven't tbe cash to buy out the car and so they may get low balled. One time my equity jumped by 1k after i started talking about just buying out the car i had on pco outright for cash.

    On the issue of changing brand/dealer it is zero hassle. They do it all the time. I have done it already.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,028 ✭✭✭ Lantus
    Registered User


    The gmfv shouldn't change, that's a contract value. But the real world value will like you say depending on mileage and damage. That in turn will affect your equity.


    So after 3 years a mint car hardly driven and as scratched car with 200k km could have the same gmfv they need to settle. But were they to trade in one would have equity and the other would get zero.


    Reality is that most new cars are quite well looked after in first 3 years.



  • Registered Users Posts: 17,959 ✭✭✭✭ Cyrus
    Registered User


    You are viewing it the way they want you to view it.


    If its 0 percent interest then its fine, if its not its costing you just in a less visible way.


    But as you say everyone can review their own numbers.



  • Registered Users Posts: 23,467 ✭✭✭✭ lawred2
    Registered User


    It's not like saying that at all.

    A PCP is a fixed rate loan where the interest is applied up front and then repayments calculated



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Car manufacturers borrowing money to fund purchases of their own products, designes to get customers into a debt trap(cannot make the balloon payment, roll over the pcp). This sytem along with the "own this sofa for just 10 euro a week" finance deals, when eventually crashing will make the previous crash(based on overleveraged property deals) look like a picnic. Not only banks going bust, but also big car manufacturers



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,028 ✭✭✭ Lantus
    Registered User


    Not sure that will happen and there is huge flexibility in car market to sell and swap. Currently demand for cars is outstripping supply so can't see any bubble or risk for near future.



  • Registered Users Posts: 50,148 ✭✭✭✭ bazz26
    Registered User


    Sure everyone likes a good drama. Nobody reads or gets outraged by mediocre posts.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,754 ✭✭✭ Buddy Bubs
    Registered User


    Motor vehicle finance won't take down the world economy. Cars are pretty easy to reposess and sell on again. I'm not on pcp myself but once understood that your monthlies are probably only covering depreciation and your ability to go again is dependent on the economy and used car values, its a pretty decent way to pay for a car.

    The problem with it is there's a huge amount of financial illiteracy and people don't know what they are getting into.

    After brexit and sterling dropped, used car values dropped and equity in cars wasn't as high as expected and made going again more expensive. At the moment, anyone coming out of a pcp will have a strong hand but somewhat diluted by new car prices going up.

    But in any case, stretching to any car that's a struggle to afford will leave you in trouble at times.



  • Registered Users Posts: 328 ✭✭ DaveByDavid


    Thanks for all the thoughts on this, it blew up a little bit.

    One thing I hadn't factored in was that the balloon payment gives a bit of flexibility - could pay it off, hand it back or even finance it - the last point in particular I hadn't really thought about.

    That's making me consider PCP now because in 3 years time I'll have a better idea of whether I'm still earning enough to afford financing a brand new car again, or whether I just want to keep it and finance it.

    I will get some figures back from a couple of dealers and see. I know one was saying you don't necessarily want to go big on the deposit, but wasn't really sure why. Ideally I think I want to put down as big a deposit as possible to stop the interest being too high, while I have the money to pay it.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,028 ✭✭✭ Lantus
    Registered User


    Big deposit if your aim is to pay off. Medium deposit at 15pc. if you think you will roll over into new car. Reason is the later keeps the monthly payments stable. The former will see a big uplift in payments unless you inject more cash after 3 years.



  • Registered Users Posts: 328 ✭✭ DaveByDavid


    Thanks, will have a think.

    Honest answer is I'm not sure so should probably keep my options open.

    Bit annoying that Hyundai aren't offering discounted APR on PCP deals though, will have a look around.



  • Posts: 0 ✭✭✭✭ Simone Shy Motorcyclist
    Registered User


    Forget about APR rates, look at total payments.

    Also in my own life, I'm on a PCP deal now, 200ish a month and no worries. An example of non-PCP going wrong would be my dad who got a new car at the start of 2019 on a 5 year loan. Start of last year mam was diagnosed with cancer so up and down to Dublin daily for a while for treatment. Start of this year car developed a noise, reported it to seller straightaway, didn't get in til 6 weeks ago. It's still in. Gearbox rebuild, replacement clutch (charged for that), timing chain needed replacing, wheel bearing needed replacing. Now the dealer is looking for a grand because service intervals apparently weren't stuck to, wonder if they've heard of Covid.

    So yeah, once you've filled out the forms and the first payment goes through realistically they don't give flying **** about you. Now my family are lumbered with a 2 year old non-running car with over €10k left to pay on it. With PCP it would at least mean we could say "Right, **** those shower of pricks, they can have the car back in 3 months" but we don't have that choice.



  • Registered Users Posts: 50,148 ✭✭✭✭ bazz26
    Registered User


    How does the above scenario make PCP better than HP?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,754 ✭✭✭ Buddy Bubs
    Registered User


    You'd lose your deposit and equity built up in the car. At 200 a month I'd suggest there was a decent deposit paid, 200 doesn't get you much without it.



  • Posts: 0 ✭✭✭✭ Simone Shy Motorcyclist
    Registered User


    If they'd gone PCP they'd have paid less per month so far and could walk away in a couple of months. Instead they've now to try and figure out what to do about a repair bill they have no way to afford for a car just about to go out of warranty and then has 2 more years of payments on it. Not sure how much the equity in a non-running car is worth when there's 2 years of payments left on it.



  • Registered Users Posts: 50,148 ✭✭✭✭ bazz26
    Registered User


    Walk away? You mean give the keys to the dealer and get the bus home? If so then they would have just made 3 years payments with nothing to show for it. They would have lost way more than a 1k repair bill.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,754 ✭✭✭ Buddy Bubs
    Registered User


    If they'd gone pcp they'd have paid deposit plus 2 years of payments and lose it all. They'd be no better off in pcp than hp financially. Convenience to walk away, yes but they'd lose their shirt



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,414 ✭✭✭✭ fits
    Registered User


    Rightly or wrongly I look on pcp as renting the car. Paid the lowest allowable deposit and monthly rate and I don’t expect anything out of it after three years. If I do that’s a bonus.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 328 ✭✭ DaveByDavid


    Be interested in some thoughts on this. I think it's more than I can justify on a car (as much as I'd love it) but I just had a mach-e AWD standard range quote come back.

    Is it normal for the GFV price to be so low? Is that Ford's way of not trusting the price of the vehicles in 3 years?

    Cost = 68,800

    Deposit = 20,600

    Amount financed = 48,200

    Monthly payments = 847.62

    GFV = 20,673.28



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