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Can a landlord/letting agent dictate the mode of transport you use

  • 29-09-2021 2:01pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭ fun loving criminal


    I have recently enquired about three properties. In my reply, I say who I am, what I do and the important bit, how much I earn, so that they know rent can be paid. I also say that I don't have a car or the expense of a car and I have no loans. So it's very clear what my pay goes on: rent, bills, food.

    I look up on Google maps and see for myself where it is and how to get to and from work before enquiring.


    However, I have received replies back telling me that I need a car.


    How can they tell me that? Surely, it's not up to them to tell me what I do or do not need?



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,494 ✭✭✭ BrokenArrows


    They are making a judgement that the commute is a lot of hassle and that you may be more inclined to break your lease agreement.

    They cant dictate what transport you use, but they are under no obligation to rent the property to you.


    Dont tell them anything about car or loans. Its not relevant. They will take your salary and its either a pass/fail result. They are not a bank and dont consider your daily expenses when considering your affordability.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭ fun loving criminal


    Break my lease agreement with very little available to rent. That is so funny.


    At least I know now to keep that bit out. But in all fairness, when they see how much I earn, it's not that difficult to figure out that rent, bills, and a car will be difficult. They can easily turn me down as well.


    I think with what I earn, it's either rent or a car. But I am considering a moped as well for a cheap mode of transport.



  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 13,465 Mod ✭✭✭✭ ednwireland


    i rent a house, there is no public transport, people without a car will usually last the summer but come winter they soon get fed up with paying for taxis and usually move out to the town. i would never stipulate but might advise them its not the best option.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭ fun loving criminal


    I know someone who cycles 18km to and from work. I cycle a bit but I think 18km is too much, so I'm looking at other forms of transport like a moped, which can be done. But one place I'm looking at is 17km from work and apparently I need a car.


    Another place i enquired about is serviced by public transport. It would mean two buses to work and two buses back home again but apparently I needed a car there as well, even though it was a distance I would have been happy to cycle.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,335 ✭✭✭ Squatman


    this is the reason you are getting offended by reasonable and honest advice from the letting agents. Ever hear of the phrase "dont bite the hand that feeds you"?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,507 ✭✭✭ dennyk


    It's also possible they would be concerned that if you were to lose your job, your lack of transportation might make it more difficult for you to find a new job quickly, thus increasing the risk of you becoming a non-performing tenant. It'd be a bit of a stretch, certainly, but unfortunately with the market the way it is, landlords are basically free to be as picky as they'd like, and car ownership (or lack thereof) isn't a protected characteristic, so they're free to reject you on that basis.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,821 ✭✭✭✭ denartha


    Maybe they know the local bus isn't reliable. Last place I lived, I never once successfully got a bus from there.



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,169 ✭✭✭ recode the site


    No they cannot. It’s a tenant’s business how they commute. But it seems like landlords are getting away with a lot of [email protected] these times, and I say that as one.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,788 ✭✭✭ ztoical


    I rented a cottage about 15km outside of town last year and the Landlord mentioned in every email and phone call that you had to have a car to get there. They were right, It was 1hr cycle to town from there and it was work, even the fittest cyclists in the world would have struggled to do a daily commute as it was up some very high narrow country roads. They said they told people this and they still looked to rent the place and would leave after a month. I was working from home and could groceries delivered but it would be very isolating to have been there with no car.

    It might not be there business but they know where their house is located and if its possible to live there without a car.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭ fun loving criminal


    Thing is with the very little places available to rent, I know I will probably end up out of town. And I know cycling probably wouldn't be an option, but surely a moped would be a better/quicker option. But I've been turned down for even mentioning this.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,368 ✭✭✭ JimmyVik


    I wouldnt even mention whether you have a car or not.

    That said there are people who came to interviews where I work who didnt get the job because someone or other decided they would have a commute that was too far for them, whether that person was happy with that commute or not.



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,914 ✭✭✭✭ Cuddlesworth


    That landlord is going to get shafted with a discrimination case doing that.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,788 ✭✭✭ ztoical


    +1 I don't know why you'd mention not owning a car, it is non of their business. If they mention the area is difficult to get to without one, just say ok.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,115 ✭✭✭ DoctorEdgeWild


    I've never had a viewing, interview, random bus conversation or date that has wandered into the territory of if I have a car or not. It's really not the sort of thing I'd put in an email or communication enquiring about a tenancy.

    I think they were simply offering you helpful information, but you've taken it differently, from my reading of what you've described.



  • Registered Users Posts: 263 ✭✭ Jmc25


    I know it's easier said than done in the current climate but generally when I've rented in the past, where agencies or landlords have looked for excessive amounts of information above and beyond references and salary details, I've tended to avoid and looked for somewhere else.

    I've taken it as a sign of unprofessionalism and that renting from them won't be a good experience. That's a big generalisation I know, but it never steered me wrong.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭ fun loving criminal


    There's one place that I enquired about and it's been bumped up again and it's not even that far out from town. 9km from town which is easy for a cycle. 15 minute walk from the bus stop as well, so not that difficult to get to and from. And yet they wouldn't even consider me because I don't have a car.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,760 ✭✭✭ dudley72


    Normally this is because someone else has moved in without a car, found the public transport is s**t in the area, complained to the LL. They can do nothing and end up having to break the lease.

    Everything is not a battle with LL people should remember, this is in all probability a LL trying to be nice



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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,875 ✭✭✭ Caranica


    Stop telling them you don't have a car?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,760 ✭✭✭ dudley72


    How? if the area has no public transport and the tenant has no means of transport it is valuable advice and wasting everyones time if they are coming for viewing



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,760 ✭✭✭ dudley72


    Maybe for you, you will find a 15 min walk is something a lot of people are incapable of doing. As someone mentioned it is ok in the summer, come the pi**ing rain in winter and soon they are complaining.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭ fun loving criminal


    Yes. I thought it might be helpful, in that it shows what my wages goes on. But, guess I was wrong.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,716 ✭✭✭ CalamariFritti


    You voluntarily offered information that is not relevant to the issue and can come back to bite you. And it has come back to bite you.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,875 ✭✭✭ Caranica


    If it was a city centre apartment, telling them that you don't need parking would be a positive but you're actually harming your chances.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭ fun loving criminal


    I honestly thought, the more money I have, the better. I don't know how people can afford it all, rent and a car.



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,169 ✭✭✭ recode the site


    It’s pretty lousy that you are in this situation by volunteering information about yourself. 🙁



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭ fun loving criminal


    I think it can go either way. Mention I earn 2000 a month and run a car and they might think how will rent be paid.

    But I honestly think, a roof over my head is better than a car. Especially since I have an alternative, a bicycle and I am getting a moped license and these places are also not too far from public transport as well.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,788 ✭✭✭ ztoical


    Someone having a car doesn't tell anyone about how well they can manage money. It could be a company car or parents helping with the car etc Running a Micra vs a Land Rover two totally different kettle of fish. Its not information you need to provide, if they ask you don't have to tell them but be aware they most likely are asking because they know what a struggle it is to live out the country without transport. Public transport and bikes are only good to a point. Looking on a map and saying sure it's only 10km isn't giving a clear picture. It could be 10km on a very busy main road with no footpath or a super narrow country lane that cars bomb down or it could be all up hill. I understand being desperate to get a roof over your head but finding yourself really isolated out the country isn't for everyone.



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