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Mews possible?

  • 25-09-2021 9:55pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 513 ✭✭✭ imokyrok


    It's not looking like my offspring have much hope of buying homes for themselves and I've often wondered if my large back garden could be be used to provide one or two small homes however it's probably a total non runner to get planning permission. It's in a small estate of dormer bungalows. The big front garden can fit up to four cars but the pedestrian access to potential new homes would be through a narrow 3 to 4ft side passage.

    Does anyone know if its worth consulting a professional at all or is it totally pointless. I'm on a low income and not in a position to waste money.



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 21,851 ✭✭✭✭ endacl


    In the event of a fire in the mews, how would a fire crew get access to your back garden in a hurry, with all their gear?

    if the answer is ‘they wouldn’t’, it’s a non runner from the get go.



  • Registered Users Posts: 513 ✭✭✭ imokyrok


    I guess it would depend on how long the hoses are to go down the side passage. Also it's beside a green so hoses could go over the wall.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,879 ✭✭✭ Caranica


    Is there any precedent in the development? Always easier not to be the first



  • Registered Users Posts: 21,851 ✭✭✭✭ endacl


    It’d be a no. They won’t be bringing special hoses four your house, or hopping the wall from the green.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,305 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    how will you provide off street parking to the new dwelling?

    you can’t park in the front garden of the existing houses as it would be a legal/right of way nightmare.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,978 ✭✭✭✭ Del2005


    The fire services will take the easiest access route and they have plenty of hoses if they need to daisy chain them together.


    OP I know till recently that some councils were encouraging building on large corner units in old estates. Arrange a meeting with you local planning department to see if it's likely to be allowed.



  • Registered Users Posts: 21,851 ✭✭✭✭ endacl


    A corner unit is a different scenario entirely. The fire access is merely the first scenario that came to mind that the OPs planning application would definitely fail on. And it would.



  • Registered Users Posts: 17,978 ✭✭✭✭ Del2005


    It'd be no different to an extension to the house or granny flat and both are often built to the rear of houses with no access. There's no harm in the OP contacting their planning department.



  • Registered Users Posts: 513 ✭✭✭ imokyrok


    No it hasnt happened anywhere else in the estate though mine is kind of unique with the front garden large enough for that many cars and it's the first property as you drive in.



  • Registered Users Posts: 513 ✭✭✭ imokyrok


    If it were family members only living in the mews?



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  • Registered Users Posts: 513 ✭✭✭ imokyrok


    Thanks. I'll give it a try. I think it makes sense to use large gardens to ease the property crisis especially in the Dublin region.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,334 ✭✭✭✭ mariaalice


    Get a planning consultant, A house beside where I use to work a suburb of Dublin has a massive back garden they got permission and a house was built in the back garden they did have a reasonable-sized side passage though enough for a car to drive up down but very tight.



  • Registered Users Posts: 48 OscarBluth


    Granny flats and extensions are all attached onto the existing house, and need to have a doorway at least that connects them. So from a fire perspective, its all one building.

    What you're describing is a totally separate dwelling that would need its own entrance. I would assume you'd need vehicular access somehow. I think the big question is: could it be sold separately? Could you divide the garden into two 'sites'? That is how most mews houses are constructed: there's laneway access at the back and the garden is subdivided. If the answer is no I can't see the council approving a separate dwelling.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,305 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    Granny flats and extensions are connected to the main dwelling, so the escape route is through the main house. The independent access doesn’t come into play. The OP is talking about a mews development, so they will come into play here.


    the 2 developments are vastly different in their requirements to get through

    1. the planning system
    2. the building regulation system which fire tender access is a requirement of under B5 of TGD part B.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,305 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    Makes no difference.

    once planning is granted, family use for the single new dwelling can change over night.


    where are you based?

    you need someone experienced with one off infill developments that can give you some guidance on the ground.

    anything is possible until you look into it properly.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,879 ✭✭✭ Caranica


    Infill development is/was part of Rebuilding Ireland as far as I recall. The plan encouraged development like the op mentions where houses have large gardens. So it's not impossible to get planning, probably wouldn't get two separate homes but maybe a block of two apartments or a subdivided house might be possible. Never easy being the first case in an area but worth a shot.



  • Registered Users Posts: 513 ✭✭✭ imokyrok


    I suspect that drive in access makes a big difference. Then again apartment blocks and town houses often have their parking a bit away so logically it shouldn't matter. Except for the fire brigade access issue mentioned.



  • Registered Users Posts: 513 ✭✭✭ imokyrok


    I'm in Fingal County. I wonder how I'd go about finding a consultant with that specific experience. I imagine if I just pick out names from a Google search they'd all claim to have it!



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭ Claw Hammer


    Planning consultants are expensive. Some architects with experience in the area dealing with the council might be willing to have a free initial consultation.



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