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10 Million euro Soil Sampling Programme.

  • 24-09-2021 10:46am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 28 farm to fork


    I came across this on Agriland the other day and spoke to a few people about it. But they were as much in the dark as I was, can anyone shed some light on the topic.

    I presume it will come with some caveat, where it will have a bearing on your nitrates etc. But it would be nice to get a comprehensive insight to soil quality on the farm without the major expense.  



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Comments

  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,087 Mod ✭✭✭✭ blue5000


    I think they are trying to find out how much OM is in the soil.

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,806 ✭✭✭ Lime Tree Farm




  • Registered Users Posts: 1,074 ✭✭✭ Dozer1


    so scheme is to open today right? I amn't in Teagasc so no option showing for me on the dept site do I need to go through a private agent or does anyone know



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,074 ✭✭✭ Dozer1


    application option is on the agfood site now for anyone interested



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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,664 ✭✭✭✭ Donald Trump


    I think that there are rules for those producing over 170kg/ha in their Nitrates that they have to have a liming plan if soil samples exist



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,594 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    Just sign up on agfoods. i did it this morning



  • Registered Users Posts: 401 ✭✭ cap.in.hand.


    It looks like the dept will organise a third party outfit to take the samples if you apply for participation in the scheme



  • Registered Users Posts: 481 ✭✭ ABitofsense


    I read through the Terms & conditions, seems straight forward. They'll come out & soil sample and then send you results. Its something that i need to do anyway so might as well join and save a few bob organizing it myself.



  • Registered Users Posts: 867 ✭✭✭ tellmeabit


    hi all,

    looking for lil more info on this, not much given away on agfood about it.

    advisor takes samples.

    is it a case that you pay for the samples and advisor and then the advisor gives you their reading of them?

    would it not be cheaper for one to rent the bleeding sampler and take them themselves. the labs give a rundown of the results dont they?



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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,594 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    My assumption of it was that the sampling and results were free but you got no grant for entering the scheme like you do for others like the sheep welfare scheme?



  • Registered Users Posts: 867 ✭✭✭ tellmeabit


    oh ok, thats probably it, i didnt follow it:

    "In lieu of payment each famer will receive the analysis reports with information on macro- and micro-nutrients, soil carbon and average farm level load of harmful bacteria."


    sounds grand so.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,087 Mod ✭✭✭✭ blue5000


    Threads merged as both on same topic.

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Registered Users Posts: 894 ✭✭✭ Anto_Meath


    Right I haven't done any research in to this apart from what I have read in the Journal and Argiland but if I am correct my understanding is:

    The government will pay "an advisor" to take soil samples on my farm, they will then pay a laboratory to test the samples and issue me a report on the soil condition of my land. But I don't get any payment for participating in this scheme however I could end up been told what I have to or cant spread on my land going forward. It doesn't sound that encouraging to me at the minute anyway. Can't understand the need for an advisor to take the samples and the most to be taken on any farm is 16 samples.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,074 ✭✭✭ Dozer1


    one thing I did hear was contract was awarded to an outside of Ireland company so samples will be flown out, whether that's due to a lab here not being able or what I don't know.

    Either way we are going to be told what we can and cannot do on our land so I applied as better be in these things from the start is my experience as no doubt they will tie further schemes to you being involved in this and the other hair brained schemes



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,726 ✭✭✭ Say my name


    I have no idea what harmful bacteria is.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,230 ✭✭✭ herdquitter




  • Registered Users Posts: 3,230 ✭✭✭ herdquitter


    Probably the exact same reason I won't join it 😁 Though some aspects would be interesting.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,514 ✭✭✭ SuperTortoise


    How much would it cost to get an average farm soil sampled?



  • Registered Users Posts: 920 ✭✭✭ timple23


    €30/35 per sample/field. I think that is a basic test.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,261 ✭✭✭ Hard Knocks


    FBA lane in Waterford are €14 for PH P & K

    They’re €30 for more in-depth test



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,726 ✭✭✭ Say my name


    I think I saw some message from IAS Bagnelstown thanking the ministers for a contract?

    I was going to go and register but after seeing messages that forest owners who received grants from the government means they've waived their right to the timber carbon, I've thought again. God we've really some hatred from dublin civil servants towards farmers and landowners. Get a college degree, work for the government, turn into a pr##k.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,230 ✭✭✭ herdquitter


    Lol, I like to be independent! They don't need to know about my soils as far as I'm concerned.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,230 ✭✭✭ herdquitter


    On forestry, I wonder could that be challenged. Meaning what were the T's & C's the farmer agreed to join the scheme under. If they didn't include CC's I'd be telling them go whistle.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,255 ✭✭✭ 893bet


    Applied.


    Timely given fert is rising so measurement becomes more important.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,384 ✭✭✭ DBK1


    The only worry I’d have is if your results come back as index 3 or 4 for P, will your fertiliser usage be curtailed in the future based on that?



  • Registered Users Posts: 867 ✭✭✭ tellmeabit


    I'd imagine my results will stink. Didn't think that it could be used to limit what you can apply thou. Suppose if selected could always leave..



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,255 ✭✭✭ 893bet


    That would be the concern alright. Especially if near a waterways similar.

    But if index is high you don’t need the fert? And it wouldn’t be long dropping if less was applied.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,384 ✭✭✭ DBK1


    Agreed, although there are certain circumstances where it could get tricky. I have one block of land that’s off the scale for P, if the indexes kept rising after 4 it’d be up somewhere near index 10 the agronomist says. It’s above the maximum that can be measured. Obviously it shouldn’t need any extra P but the agronomist says at such a high level of P, it is probably locked in the soil and so I need to get a maintenance level out every year on it to keep growth right. I do this by getting slurry on it a few times a year and the only bagged fert it gets is mostly 19-0-15 or just nitrogen. If I was prevented from allowing any P out on that would it mean I wouldn’t be allowed spread slurry there?

    Also, as far as I remember, and I stand to be corrected, for anyone lowly stocked, I think at less than 120kgs/ha of organic N, if you are index 3 in land you’re only allowed 8 or 10 units of P per acre per year, unless you can show the land is used solely for silage or that the silage or hay taken from it was sold off farm. If you are index 4 you’re not allowed any P at all regardless of stocking rate. That’s fine for any fert you’re buying, it can be bought without the P but it also leaves you in a situation where you can’t import any slurry as you wouldn’t be allowed bring in the P in the slurry. Around here there is easy access to pig slurry and it’s a huge help to keep the fertiliser costs down so if I wasn’t allowed import pig slurry due to soil sample results it would have an economical effect on my farm as I’d have to buy in more N and K instead of using the free pig slurry.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,384 ✭✭✭ DBK1


    Maybe I’m over thinking it but if the results are there and on the department database they have the info required to them tell you what you can or can’t spread. For anyone that imports slurry or dung I’d be advising them to work out their figures first before jumping into it.



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