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Can a regular home draw down 2600 watts of extra power?

  • 15-09-2021 2:00pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 73 ✭✭ Adren


    Can a regular home draw down 2600 watts of extra power?

    Thanks.



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 3,358 ✭✭✭ 10-10-20


    Not sure. We don't have enough information. Where are you getting this value from?

    In theory, yes, if you have PC's, lights and TV's left on, as well as a fridge running and pumps, etc, you could possibly get to 2.6kW of nominal loading. I know my son was mining coins, he was consuming 800w/hr for 3 months. Tell us more?



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 12,140 Mod ✭✭✭✭ 2011


    What do you mean by “extra” ? Do you mean addition to your normal maximum load?



  • Registered Users Posts: 73 ✭✭ Adren


    Yea it'd be for mining coins, either 2600 Watt, or 3500 Watt, running for 24 hours.

    How many solar panels out of curiosity would it take to run one of those rigs respectively? (Way too many I'd imagine) Would the Irish weather even permit it?

    I mean yea extra, running one of those rigs on top of an average 3-bed house.



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 12,140 Mod ✭✭✭✭ 2011


    Normally this would be fine. When a kettle is plugged in it is 3000 watts of "extra" load. It would take a very long time for solar panel payback.



  • Registered Users Posts: 73 ✭✭ Adren


    A kettle is plugged in it is 3000 watts of "extra" load.

    Ok just shows my complete ignorance in the area haha.

    Ok, so a kettle only stays on for a few minutes, but what issues might one run into when a machine is running 24/7?



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  • Registered Users Posts: 404 ✭✭ Adversarial


    The only issue you will have running 3 kW through household electrical system constantly will your bill at the end of every month.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,368 ✭✭✭ JimmyVik


    We often have 15,000 watts or more for long periods. at a given time. Probably far higher than that too if the immersion and the kettle and toaster are on.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,358 ✭✭✭ 10-10-20


    Excess heat is one. The miner will convert almost all of that 3000w into heat, that's about one and a half electric room heater's worth of heat. In this day-in-age, it's not good practice to simply waste that amount of heat. If the systems are located centrally in the house then at least that heat is consumed in the living space, but it may still become a problem as if we have warmer days.

    I noticed with my son's rig that it was heating and partially transferring through up a ~1m square portion of an internal solid brick wall, so at least part of the heat was coming into the living room. 😂



  • Registered Users Posts: 561 ✭✭✭ jumbone


    2600W = 2.6 kW

    A 'unit' for billing purposes 1kW/h - i.e. the amount of energy consumed by running a 1kW load for an hour

    Running your mining rig for an hour will use... 2.6kW/h

    Your bill will tell you your exact unit price but assume something like 26c per kW/h

    Therefore your rig will cost 67.6c to run per hour

    therefore €16.22 per day or €486.24 per month


    How long would it take you to mine €486.24 of coin? and bear in mind that you would also need to cover the cost of the miner..



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