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Sally Rooney disappears up her own etc

  • 13-09-2021 4:46pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3,266 ✭✭✭ An Claidheamh


    Sally Rooney romance, teen angst and chick lit author appears to be offering her rent-a-clichés to the Germans



    "Rooney recalled how, as a result, (Sinéad) O’Connor was “ostracised in the cultural and social life of Ireland” in the 1990s."


    "Rooney was asked by Der Spiegel magazine if she had endured pushback against her books from Ireland’s “Catholic milieu” similar to that endured in the past by Sinéad O’Connor."

    (Re: SNL and tearing up Pope photo)


    What's interesting is that Rooney was aged 1 in 1992 and I'm not aware of any ostracisation against Sinéad O'Connor, nor of Rooney ever studying Irish social history of the 1990s


    I do recall S O'C being distanced by the British (and therefore Irish) media due to support for the Provos and lying about being in a Magdalene laundry despite overwhelming evidence she was in fact living a middle class life in Bray


    Is there a reason why Rooney and her likes (e.g. Louise O'Neill) get so much air time whem they clearly don't have a clue and can Irish female writers not sell books on their own merit without a 'woe is me' agenda?



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Comments

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  • Registered Users Posts: 29,151 ✭✭✭✭ NIMAN


    Wish I was a euro behind her.



  • Registered Users Posts: 20,372 ✭✭✭✭ One eyed Jack



    I enjoy plenty of works of fiction written by women, but the reason Sally Rooney (and Louise O’ Neill in the same vein) get so much critical acclaim is because their writing is miserable, not because anything they write is actually well written.

    It’s true I’m definitely not the target audience for their books, not because I’m not a woman, but because I’m not miserable. EL James wrote works of fiction that were popular with women too, and they were truly examples of awful writing, but they weren’t dripping with misery so didn’t receive the same critical acclaim.

    ”Salinger for the Snapchat generation” seems about right, though I’m sure it’s meant as a positive critique.





  • Registered Users Posts: 1,613 ✭✭✭ Hamachi


    Just curious, have you actually read 'Conversations with friends' and 'Normal people'?

    In my view, the TV adaptation of 'Normal People' was excellent. In fact, it was significantly superior to the novel, which is somewhat repetitive and replete with pretty uninspiring prose.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,428 ✭✭✭✭ Thelonious Monk


    No I don't think I'm the target audience for the books but I did enjoy the TV show



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,613 ✭✭✭ Hamachi


    Cool. I'm not their target audience either, but read both novels, due to the Booker prize buzz around 'Normal People'. I was distinctly underwhelmed by the caliber of the writing.

    I'm not saying this to undermine Sally or out of begrudgery for her success. I was expecting more and simply did not enjoy the novels. I also found the studenty marxist discourse pretty grating. Thankfully, they minimized this dialogue in the TV adaptation of 'Normal People'.

    Having said all that, 'Conversations with friends' just wrapped filming and I'm sure I'll take a look when it's released.



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,533 ✭✭✭✭ Beechwoodspark


    her books are just very ....tiresome



  • Registered Users Posts: 30,635 ✭✭✭✭ listermint


    Yay someone else to get upset about. A continuation of 'you know what really grinds my gears'



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,990 ✭✭✭ Padre_Pio




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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,266 ✭✭✭ An Claidheamh


    Apparently Sally does, as she was born a year later …



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,020 ✭✭✭ kowloonkev


    If a writer has a 'target audience' then they are not a serious writer. Just because someone is female shouldn't mean they can't appeal to everyone if they are inspired authors with something worthy to say.

    They will be judged by the test of time. I wonder if Mary Shelley had a target audience...



  • Registered Users Posts: 110 ✭✭ backwards_man


    SOC was sent to a laundry in Drumcondra for 18 months when she was 14. Why do you say she was lying about it?



  • Registered Users Posts: 689 ✭✭✭ BettyS


    I didn’t particularly enjoy Beautiful World, Where Are You. I enjoyed her other books far more. I found the pseudo-intellectualism rather jarring. It felt so deliberate to try to convey to the reader how clever these people were. I also found the despair element that the characters felt to be irritating. They kept talking about the oppression of the people in the developing world. They assume the pain that is not theirs to take. More reprehensible is the fact that they live by all accounts in massive houses and have iPhones (I am not condemning these things, I just think that if you do this alongside a long diatribe about economic suppression of the underclasses, you undermine credibility). I wish that she would select characters that were relatable. The characters were by all accounts beautiful, extremely intelligent or famous. I know that it may not sell a book. But I want to read about somebody mired in utter mediocrity. These tales are not supposed to be fantastical. But the characters are. Finally, despite all her professions in the book, it ends up a hackneyed tale of girl and boy. It all ends up neatly in a package. This is not real life.

    My opinion is obviously in the minority. People seem to be fawning over the book. I read it, wanting to love it. But I didn’t



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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,840 ✭✭✭ fvp4


    The TV series was better. Good acting and direction. Makes a difference.

    last week sally Rooney was called a white supremacist for not including enough about Asians in her stories set in western Ireland.


    https://www.smh.com.au/culture/tv-and-radio/surely-there-are-better-literary-heroes-for-our-generation-than-sally-rooney-20210817-p58jfp.html



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