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Overhanging trees in fields

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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,820 ✭✭✭893bet


    wrangler wrote: »
    I also depends whether your 'let go wild' sort of management is due to laziness or care for nature., I'd guess the most of what I see is the former.e

    End result is largely the same.

    Laziness is wrong word. It’s hardly “hardwork” to ring the contractor and get a machine in. It’s the definition of laziness actually to do that.

    I have also found that contractors are obsessed with neatness. Had a track machine in to do some hedges that had not done in a while and the cut some stuff that really didn’t need to be cut. You almost need to be standing beside them really I find. Maybe it’s just my one is a moron. Might be that.

    I prefer a light trim with a chainsaw in the odd spot that needs it and a machine in every 7- 10 or so years to put manners on where needed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,090 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    893bet wrote: »
    End result is largely the same.

    Laziness is wrong word. It’s hardly “hardwork” to ring the contractor and get a machine in. It’s the definition of laziness actually to do that.

    I have also found that contractors are obsessed with neatness. Had a track machine in to do some hedges that had not done in a while and the cut some stuff that really didn’t need to be cut. You almost need to be standing beside them really I find. Maybe it’s just my one is a moron. Might be that.

    I prefer a light trim with a chainsaw in the odd spot that needs it and a machine in every 7- 10 or so years to put manners on where needed.

    Whitethorn any way thrives on hard cutting, I've a ditch that I laid two years ago and those trees that i thought were useless I cut level with the clay and there's actually shoots actually coming from under the clay now. they'll be all laid left and right in a few years. I only did a couple hundred metres because my OH told me I was destroying the ditch so for peace i stopped, there's going to be a great fence in it now


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 MeadowMaker


    [/B]

    worse again is the spraying of round-up either side of the road gate

    Yes I have noticed that also.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,395 ✭✭✭roosterman71


    Some real hate towards nature and ecosystems here worthy of Bolsonaro. God forbid any wildlife would need a corridor through your manicured farm, only nuisances to be shot and poisoned. Reminds me of those householders with OCD not content with mowing their lawns they go outside on the road with ride on lawnmowers to mow the verges up and down for a km on both sides of the road.

    I'll have to pull you up on that. Where is the hatred towards nature. Point it out. Only one, maybe 2 posters have advocated "manicured farms". Majority here have said to trim the hedge in question, but don't cut it down as it provides a function for wildlife, shelter for animals and helps drainage of land.
    [/B]
    worse again is the spraying of round-up either side of the road gate

    Or the people in estates spraying roundup on driveways as a bit of grass is growing (how does that bottle and spare contents get disposed????). Or the council going around on a quad mass spraying footpaths to kill the weeds. Or the same council cutting 6 or 8 foot of grass along both sides of a main road (seen that on the way to Mullingar today).


  • Registered Users Posts: 537 ✭✭✭PoorFarmer


    [/B]

    worse again is the spraying of round-up either side of the road gate

    Both sides of the gate and across the road too :-l


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  • Registered Users Posts: 11,090 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    I'll have to pull you up on that. Where is the hatred towards nature. Point it out. Only one, maybe 2 posters have advocated "manicured farms". Majority here have said to trim the hedge in question, but don't cut it down as it provides a function for wildlife, shelter for animals and helps drainage of land.



    Or the people in estates spraying roundup on driveways as a bit of grass is growing (how does that bottle and spare contents get disposed????). Or the council going around on a quad mass spraying footpaths to kill the weeds. Or the same council cutting 6 or 8 foot of grass along both sides of a main road (seen that on the way to Mullingar today).

    If you go to good farming areas you'll see lots of manicured hedges....... there's enough of the hedge after usually for wildlife.
    It's not an image I'd expect actually, a farmer with a fendt not particular about keeping a tidy farm


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,820 ✭✭✭893bet


    “Good farming areas”?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,395 ✭✭✭roosterman71


    wrangler wrote: »
    If you go to good farming areas you'll see lots of manicured hedges....... there's enough of the hedge after usually for wildlife.
    It's not an image I'd expect actually, a farmer with a fendt not particular about keeping a tidy farm

    Part time farmer :D

    Our hedges are grand and tidy. Sure I even bought my own hedge cutter earlier in the year for the job. That's on top of the Slanetrac I have for the loader for going along the side of sheep wire.

    That's not to say that the stronger hedges are left strong. For example
    2021-02-13-14-52-36.jpg
    High enough, yet trimmed in with a fence alongside. Probably 90% of the land is like this, though some has more overhanging branches but are above the cab level (apologies for the distant pic, it's all I have to hand here on the phone)

    The rest is more like this. 8 year old whitethorn, trimmed each Autumn. Short back and sides job. Same height as the sheep wire
    2021-03-06-10-48-22.jpg

    2021-04-03-20-06-33.jpg

    Now what the type of tractor I have has to do with anything I've no idea. I've other yokes too (dexta, 135, Nuffield, Leyland). What do they say about the type of farmer I should be? Furthermore, my yard and sheds are neat and tidy. Ya know, the places that get most use.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,090 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    Part time farmer :D

    Our hedges are grand and tidy. Sure I even bought my own hedge cutter earlier in the year for the job. That's on top of the Slanetrac I have for the loader for going along the side of sheep wire.

    That's not to say that the stronger hedges are left strong. For example
    2021-02-13-14-52-36.jpg
    High enough, yet trimmed in with a fence alongside. Probably 90% of the land is like this, though some has more overhanging branches but are above the cab level (apologies for the distant pic, it's all I have to hand here on the phone)

    The rest is more like this. 8 year old whitethorn, trimmed each Autumn. Short back and sides job. Same height as the sheep wire
    2021-03-06-10-48-22.jpg

    2021-04-03-20-06-33.jpg

    Now what the type of tractor I have has to do with anything I've no idea. I've other yokes too (dexta, 135, Nuffield, Leyland). What do they say about the type of farmer I should be? Furthermore, my yard and sheds are neat and tidy. Ya know, the places that get most use.

    Sure I was right, you are particular and it's just an image I have of those that buy new fendts.
    I wonder does anyone else on here think the same.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,996 ✭✭✭green daries


    There was a very good presentation by an excellent environmentalist lady who's name escapes me.
    But the just of her talk and lifelong research is that hedges are man-made and artificial and yo be valuable to nature need to be maintained a hedge roughly 2.5 metres high and wide in a sligh a shape is the most suitable for wildlife
    Re maintenance her main point was trimmed two years ar three apart and keeping one inch above the previous cut to allow fir the production of berries etc high hedges should be copised or layed to rejuvenate
    Laying of mature hedges was possible in her opinion but difficult


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,038 ✭✭✭minerleague


    There was a very good presentation by an excellent environmentalist lady who's name escapes me.
    But the just of her talk and lifelong research is that hedges are man-made and artificial and yo be valuable to nature need to be maintained a hedge roughly 2.5 metres high and wide in a sligh a shape is the most suitable for wildlife
    Re maintenance her main point was trimmed two years ar three apart and keeping one inch above the previous cut to allow fir the production of berries etc high hedges should be copised or layed to rejuvenate
    Laying of mature hedges was possible in her opinion but difficult

    This is a good point, hedges are manmade and our farming ancestors ridded Ireland of woodland based nature ( wolves etc) As the politicians say we are where we are and we should try and protect what we have now ( what adapted to changing landscape)
    Just a quick comment on laying - the videos you tend to see on youtube are way OTT, almost arts and crafts, Think this puts off a lot of people.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,996 ✭✭✭green daries


    This is a good point, hedges are manmade and our farming ancestors ridded Ireland of woodland based nature ( wolves etc) As the politicians say we are where we are and we should try and protect what we have now ( what adapted to changing landscape)
    Just a quick comment on laying - the videos you tend to see on youtube are way OTT, almost arts and crafts, Think this puts off a lot of people.

    Absolutely depends on the hedge but a reasonable digger man will lay any hedge plenty good it's the really old mature one that would probably benefit from copocing


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,003 ✭✭✭handlemaster


    Trees and hedges are under rated in this country. Animals need food but also shelter. I would rather look at a mature hedge than a wire fence any day of the week.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,212 ✭✭✭✭Say my name


    Trees and hedges are under rated in this country. Animals need food but also shelter. I would rather look at a mature hedge than a wire fence any day of the week.

    You'll also get improved grass growth around ditches. Particularly evident on the down wind side of the ditch.
    And even more so evident if fert inputs are reduced.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,003 ✭✭✭handlemaster


    You'll also get improved grass growth around ditches. Particularly evident on the down wind side of the ditch.
    And even more so evident if fert inputs are reduced.

    Plus cold livestock use more energy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,131 ✭✭✭wildwillow


    Some real hate towards nature and ecosystems here worthy of Bolsonaro. God forbid any wildlife would need a corridor through your manicured farm, only nuisances to be shot and poisoned. Reminds me of those householders with OCD not content with mowing their lawns they go outside on the road with ride on lawnmowers to mow the verges up and down for a km on both sides of the road.

    We live on a busy L road but it's a rat run linking two motorways. We keep the edge of the road well trimmed and the hedges tightly cut to enable us walk on the edge and avoid the actual road. A neighbour's child walks to meet the school bus and without a trimmed verge she wouldn't survive a week.

    Lorries speed past and no one obeys the unbroken white lines. As for mobile phone use.... We are essentially providing a footpath and trim it fortnightly from spring to autumn. Otherwise it would be nettles encroaching the road.

    We don't use sprays.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,090 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    You'll also get improved grass growth around ditches. Particularly evident on the down wind side of the ditch.
    And even more so evident if fert inputs are reduced.

    There's improved grass growth around ditches because the cattle lie there and dung there nthen when the get up. They don't like to graze there then and hence there's more grass


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,212 ✭✭✭✭Say my name


    wrangler wrote: »
    There's improved grass growth around ditches because the cattle lie there and dung there nthen when the get up. They don't like to graze there then and hence there's more grass


    https://twitter.com/realJohnKempf/status/1295681230764220417?s=20


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,672 ✭✭✭Lime Tree Farm


    wrangler wrote: »
    There's improved grass growth around ditches because the cattle lie there and dung there nthen when the get up. They don't like to graze there then and hence there's more grass

    I always thought they didn't graze the shaded grass because it was less sweet. that the grass grew taller in shade trying to reach the light.
    grass needs light to manufacture sugars, making it more palatable..


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,663 ✭✭✭Birdnuts


    I always thought they didn't graze the shaded grass because it was less sweet. that the grass grew taller in shade trying to reach the light.
    grass needs light to manufacture sugars, making it more palatable..

    More soil moisture and hummus avaible for grass growth is a big factor - especcially during periods of drought stress


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,134 ✭✭✭screamer


    Wish we had land leased from you. We had to get in a saw and big mulcher to sort the ditches out as the farmer who owns the land couldn’t be arsed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,820 ✭✭✭893bet


    screamer wrote: »
    Wish we had land leased from you. We had to get in a saw and big mulcher to sort the ditches out as the farmer who owns the land couldn’t be arsed.

    How do you know he “couldn’t be arsed”.

    It’s easy be arsed pick up the phone and bring in the contractor......

    More likely he didn’t see the value financially and secondly was happy with the diversity it brought. And he was right on both counts as you decided to do it....!


  • Registered Users Posts: 828 ✭✭✭Sugarbowl


    What’s the protocol if a coilte owned forest tree falls into your land? There must be 4/5 trees after falling into my field after the winter.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,725 ✭✭✭Castlekeeper


    Sugarbowl wrote: »
    What’s the protocol if a coilte owned forest tree falls into your land? There must be 4/5 trees after falling into my field after the winter.

    If they fall into your land they're your trees to cut up. (I looked into it before as I'd a neighbour with zero interest in taking his head out of mortal kombat or call of duty etc. to engage in the real world).


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,395 ✭✭✭roosterman71


    I've some fine big ash trees that have fallen into a neighbours land. We have a small wood between us and the trees on my side fell across the wire into his. He won't let me in to cut them up and says he wants them. They fell in 2017 during Ophelia :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,890 ✭✭✭Bullocks


    I've some fine big ash trees that have fallen into a neighbours land. We have a small wood between us and the trees on my side fell across the wire into his. He won't let me in to cut them up and says he wants them. They fell in 2017 during Ophelia :(

    Would you get in with a digger some morning and sling them back your own side for cutting?
    Is the wire sagged now or still stock proof.
    We had a neighbour that cut Ash trees his side of the wire a couple of years ago and threw all the tops out our side because we had plenty of room and his lawn didn't. Twice I threw them back over and he put them back at night before he got the msg, only a couple of weeks ago did he replace the concrete post and wire he damaged by knocking the tree. The bollix


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,776 ✭✭✭paddysdream


    I've some fine big ash trees that have fallen into a neighbours land. We have a small wood between us and the trees on my side fell across the wire into his. He won't let me in to cut them up and says he wants them. They fell in 2017 during Ophelia :(

    Far as I know they are your property still .He can cut them up but has to give them back to you or at least offer them to you .
    Same as a tree falling on the road during a storm .The landowner owns the timber no matter who cuts it up .
    Seen it happen around here a couple of years ago when two trees blew over belonging to a neighbour on an outfarm .
    When he went to look someone had them all sawed up ready for collection .He found out who had done it and said thanks for that and promptly took them home for himself .Bit mean but well within his rights although the lad who sawed them up wouldn't be too behind the door himself .


  • Registered Users Posts: 368 ✭✭Ian OB


    https://twitter.com/killersundymann/status/1355107287237537794?s=19

    Spotted this & immediately thought of this thread


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,820 ✭✭✭893bet


    This weather should serve as a reminder as to how important shelter is in a field. Can see the cattle clamouring for shade.

    Post edited by 893bet on


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  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    8 hoggets turned up into a little valley yesterday while I was watching them, they all made for the shadow of a single bent over hawthorn tree.



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