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first bike recommendation

  • 18-06-2021 12:37pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ bigmc23


    It will mainly be used for commuting in Dublin, weekend riding and maybe a triathlon next year.

    what would you recommend? road bike? gravel bike? is there a minimum tyre clearance I should look for?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ bigmc23


    Bump


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,419 ✭✭✭ fat bloke


    Ya gotsta show us yer money.

    All too often such threads / requests finish up with a naïvely unrealistic and game-ending "... and I'd like to spend max 175 euro"


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 42,445 Mod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    also, a triathlon bike and a bike suitable for commuting can be different beasts. that's not to say you can't enter a triathlon on a normal road bike.

    if you're using it for commuting, your best bet is a road bike with clearance for mudguards, maybe a pannier rack etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 656 ✭✭✭ davegilly


    Similar to you and I purchased a Gravel Bike - https://www.orbea.com/ie-en/bicycles/urban/vector/cat/vector-drop - It's perfect for what you want to do. Not the lightest or fastest bike but wider tyres mean less punctures which when commuting will help. You're not going to win a triathlon on it but I'm cycling 80-100K in it at the moment no problem. If I had my time back again then I'd probably spring for something with a 105 groupset - will really help going up hills but what I have is perfectly fine to be honest.

    If winning is your aim then it's a whole different conversation. And price point.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,419 ✭✭✭ fat bloke


    davegilly wrote: »
    Similar to you and I purchased a Gravel Bike - https://www.orbea.com/ie-en/bicycles/urban/vector/cat/vector-drop - .

    That's a lovely looking bike. And I didn't realise Tiagra had gone hydraulic. Where did you pick that up?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,092 ✭✭✭ boombang


    Don't spend less than €500 is a good starting point as you'll only get junk that will cause you heartache.


  • Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ bigmc23


    fat bloke wrote: »
    Ya gotsta show us yer money.

    All too often such threads / requests finish up with a naïvely unrealistic and game-ending "... and I'd like to spend max 175 euro"

    On the b2w scheme so budget is €1,250


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,796 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Weepsie


    davegilly wrote: »
    Similar to you and I purchased a Gravel Bike - https://www.orbea.com/ie-en/bicycles/urban/vector/cat/vector-drop - It's perfect for what you want to do. Not the lightest or fastest bike but wider tyres mean less punctures which when commuting will help. You're not going to win a triathlon on it but I'm cycling 80-100K in it at the moment no problem. If I had my time back again then I'd probably spring for something with a 105 groupset - will really help going up hills but what I have is perfectly fine to be honest.

    If winning is your aim then it's a whole different conversation. And price point.

    Don't think the 105 will help you get up hills any better. That bike has a 34 cog at the back.

    Knowing what gear to be in will get you up quicker


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,182 ✭✭✭ a148pro


    bigmc23 wrote: »
    It will mainly be used for commuting in Dublin, weekend riding and maybe a triathlon next year.

    what would you recommend? road bike? gravel bike? is there a minimum tyre clearance I should look for?

    There's no need for a gravel bike or minimum tyre clearance if you're not going off road or on bumpy fire roads / tracks and trails

    (unless you need specific tyre clearance for mud guards and stuff - I don't know about that)

    Otherwise I actually think a cheap bike is grand. You have €1,250 budget which is good. I wouldn't actually be worried about getting 105, I have three different group sets across 3 different bikes and they're all grand. A good groupset is really a luxury.

    So I'd just determine if you want to go off road or not and then ride a few bikes and buy the one you feel most comfortable on. I assume if you don't get 105 the saving you make will go into other parts of the bike.


  • Registered Users Posts: 656 ✭✭✭ davegilly


    fat bloke wrote: »
    That's a lovely looking bike. And I didn't realise Tiagra had gone hydraulic. Where did you pick that up?

    Rothar in Phibsborough


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  • Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ bigmc23


    cheers to the replies all, now just the small matter of finding a shop with stock!


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,335 ✭✭✭ Macy0161


    I'd focus on the commuting/ weekend spins tbh. Starting Triathlon you're not going to compete on even the bike leg on any road bike imo (on most courses anyway).

    If I was buying one bike to rule them all at the moment, I'd also say a gravel bike. Most have clearance for decent width tyres, plus mounting points for rack and mudguards.
    fat bloke wrote: »
    And I didn't realise Tiagra had gone hydraulic.
    Last year I think, when they upgraded all the hydraulic hoods too. My 2020 Topstone AL came with hydraulic Tiagra anyway and can't really fault it. I only changed out the crankset to GRX for the gearing from the FSA it came with so I could fit a hollowtech 2 power meter I already had!


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