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After buy disappointments

  • 12-06-2021 12:27am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 90 ✭✭ GalwayBmw


    Buying doesn't alway come with excitment. After a long wait you finally got the keys and moved in just to find out that... Does anyone mind sharing their experiences In this thread?


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 5,802 ✭✭✭ CollyFlower


    GalwayBmw wrote: »
    Buying doesn't alway come with excitment. After a long wait you finally got the keys and moved in just to find out that... Does anyone mind sharing their experiences In this thread?

    I'd say that there are lots of people that have regrets after buying, I'm thinking neighbors form hell! Can't think of anything worse.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,686 ✭✭✭✭ punisher5112


    New hot water cylinder needed, boiler on its last legs, oil tank way past its life, floors and doors made of cardboard.... Hear everything through them, if upstairs trying to sleep you can hear everything downstairs likely were actually there.....
    PISsed off with that one it's that bad, can hear next door going up and down the stairs, front door, the child crying, shower, music etc etc.... Not their fault they aren't actually that loud but the build quality... My god is it beyond poor.


    Garden front and back like a swamp in winter, never dries out, sink in the grass....


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,095 ✭✭✭ Yellow_Fern


    New hot water cylinder needed, boiler on its last legs, oil tank way past its life, floors and doors made of cardboard.... Hear everything through them, if upstairs trying to sleep you can hear everything downstairs likely were actually there.....
    PISsed off with that one it's that bad, can hear next door going up and down the stairs, front door, the child crying, shower, music etc etc.... Not their fault they aren't actually that loud but the build quality... My god is it beyond poor.


    Garden front and back like a swamp in winter, never dries out, sink in the grass....

    Is that a new house? I think discovering this after moving is common.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 23,054 Mod ✭✭✭✭ godtabh


    New hot water cylinder needed, boiler on its last legs, oil tank way past its life, floors and doors made of cardboard.... Hear everything through them, if upstairs trying to sleep you can hear everything downstairs likely were actually there.....
    PISsed off with that one it's that bad, can hear next door going up and down the stairs, front door, the child crying, shower, music etc etc.... Not their fault they aren't actually that loud but the build quality... My god is it beyond poor.


    Garden front and back like a swamp in winter, never dries out, sink in the grass....

    That’s whey you due a pre inspection survey and make an offer to cover that. None of the above should have been a surprise.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,689 ✭✭✭ 3DataModem


    GalwayBmw wrote: »
    Buying doesn't alway come with excitment. After a long wait you finally got the keys and moved in just to find out that... Does anyone mind sharing their experiences In this thread?

    Attic and shed packed with rubbish.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 24,686 ✭✭✭✭ punisher5112


    Is that a new house? I think discovering this after moving is common.

    Built in 98


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,686 ✭✭✭✭ punisher5112


    godtabh wrote: »
    That’s whey you due a pre inspection survey and make an offer to cover that. None of the above should have been a surprise.

    We did get surveyed, the guy never even noticed the cylinder was leaking, I should have seen myself but it was a lot to take on in the quick look around.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,650 ✭✭✭ Marcusm


    We did get surveyed, the guy never even noticed the cylinder was leaking, I should have seen myself but it was a lot to take on in the quick look around.

    And that is why the surveyor should have insurance to deal with the claim for negligence which you will file!


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,686 ✭✭✭✭ punisher5112


    Marcusm wrote: »
    And that is why the surveyor should have insurance to deal with the claim for negligence which you will file!

    Too late now, we here few years now. Going to put rockwool between up and downstairs for sound


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,095 ✭✭✭ Yellow_Fern


    Too late now, we here few years now. Going to put rockwool between up and downstairs for sound

    While you are at it, make sure you check that there is cracked cement or gaps around the joists and add mass loaded vinyl to the floor. PM if you need pics


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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,289 ✭✭✭✭ Mad_maxx


    some people take quite a while to grow fond of anything regardless of how objectively great it is , i dont think its unusual to not love something early on

    if you felt the same a year down the line , i would be thinking its just not for you


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,812 ✭✭✭ Wesser


    Mad_maxx wrote: »
    some people take quite a while to grow fond of anything regardless of how objectively great it is , i dont think its unusual to not love something early on

    if you felt the same a year down the line , i would be thinking its just not for you


    Lol its like picking a husband for yourself!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ Jmc25


    Bought an apartment having viewed it twice had surveyor etc. Moved in and sounded like the child upstairs was about to come through the ceiling. Not only had no joy in approaching the neighbour with a quiet word, things got worse and I think there was a certain pleasure taken in being as loud as possible at all times, dumping litter/water on our balcony, other anti social behaviour in general.

    The apartment structure was made of paper which was the ultimate problem, but add in a neighbour who you wouldn't like to live beside in the best built house in the world AND a pandemic then you've got a real cocktail for disaster.

    I didn't do my homework on the purchase and I paid for it, fifty times over. Luckily was able to sell and get the hell out but still a couple of years from hell.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭ Cash_Q


    Bought first house in 2018 after renting for 15+yrs , lovely settled estate near my family home, just within budget, ok decor and plenty of scope to put our own stamp on it.. kept pinching ourselves wondering what's the catch.. not one, not two, but three sets of neighbours from hell in our terrace. An otherwise lovely, calm, settled cul de sac, but these 3 were notorious among everyone once we got talking to the other neighbours. We sold and moved after 2.5 years, I'm sure you'll see why..

    1 - elderly woman who essentially stalked our movements, appearing in the front and back gardens at the same time as us. Leaning out an upstairs window if she couldn't get downstairs quickly enough. Repeating conversations back to me that she eavesdropped on. Commenting on everything from our clothes, bins, visitors, state of the garden, choice of supermarkets, other neighbours drinking habits, previous occupiers sex life (!), her own underwear, bird**** on the window.. insisted on gifting us things for our baby, constantly reminding us that she did so. Considered herself a good neighbour. Polished her clean windows while we were having photos taken of the house to sell, she was IN the photos of the front of the house on Daft ffs. Lived there most of her life and acted as if she owned our house as well as her own.

    2 - family of drug addicts. Fights morning, noon and night, parties raging, pregnant teen drinking, local youths invited to smash up their furniture outside their house and take it for bonfire wood, son released from prison died of an overdose in the house. Smoking out the back at all hours of the night, chatting and playing music. Sound insulation was so poor we could hear their kettle boil at night so imagine how amplified all that other stuff was. Renting long term from the council so little chance of them being moved on. We were attached directly to their right, you'd think the house attached to their left would complain? Nah, that brings me onto...

    3 - small time drug dealer, supporting the needs of 2 above! Bench in the front garden for drinking in the sun with occupants of 2 above, music blaring from the car on the drive. Smart comments about everything and anything as we tried to come and go quickly and quietly. Inherited the house from his mother so not going anywhere and acted like he owned the whole terrace. Relationship broke down and he started drinking with the local homeless addicts and bringing them around the place. Front porch kicked in by teens over drugs/money, of course he said it was mistaken identity.

    We miraculously sold that house at a small profit enabling us to move just 1km up the road. Best thing we ever did, don't know ourselves with the peace and quiet. Lovely neighbours all around us. That first house we had driven up and down the street at all times of the day and night, nothing could have warned us about these people. Sale occurred between Nov-March.. if we had seen the garden drinking in the summer that would have set alarm bells but nothing in the world could have prepared us for how bad it was.

    We are extremely lucky to have gotten away!


  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭ mick121


    3DataModem wrote: »
    Attic and shed packed with rubbish.

    That is your solicitors fault, should have been written into the contract that she'd,attic etc has to be cleared.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,671 ✭✭✭ Sweet.Science


    Cash_Q wrote: »
    Bought first house in 2018 after renting for 15+yrs , lovely settled estate near my family home, just within budget, ok decor and plenty of scope to put our own stamp on it.. kept pinching ourselves wondering what's the catch.. not one, not two, but three sets of neighbours from hell in our terrace. An otherwise lovely, calm, settled cul de sac, but these 3 were notorious among everyone once we got talking to the other neighbours. We sold and moved after 2.5 years, I'm sure you'll see why..

    1 - elderly woman who essentially stalked our movements, appearing in the front and back gardens at the same time as us. Leaning out an upstairs window if she couldn't get downstairs quickly enough. Repeating conversations back to me that she eavesdropped on. Commenting on everything from our clothes, bins, visitors, state of the garden, choice of supermarkets, other neighbours drinking habits, previous occupiers sex life (!), her own underwear, bird**** on the window.. insisted on gifting us things for our baby, constantly reminding us that she did so. Considered herself a good neighbour. Polished her clean windows while we were having photos taken of the house to sell, she was IN the photos of the front of the house on Daft ffs. Lived there most of her life and acted as if she owned our house as well as her own.

    2 - family of drug addicts. Fights morning, noon and night, parties raging, pregnant teen drinking, local youths invited to smash up their furniture outside their house and take it for bonfire wood, son released from prison died of an overdose in the house. Smoking out the back at all hours of the night, chatting and playing music. Sound insulation was so poor we could hear their kettle boil at night so imagine how amplified all that other stuff was. Renting long term from the council so little chance of them being moved on. We were attached directly to their right, you'd think the house attached to their left would complain? Nah, that brings me onto...

    3 - small time drug dealer, supporting the needs of 2 above! Bench in the front garden for drinking in the sun with occupants of 2 above, music blaring from the car on the drive. Smart comments about everything and anything as we tried to come and go quickly and quietly. Inherited the house from his mother so not going anywhere and acted like he owned the whole terrace. Relationship broke down and he started drinking with the local homeless addicts and bringing them around the place. Front porch kicked in by teens over drugs/money, of course he said it was mistaken identity.

    We miraculously sold that house at a small profit enabling us to move just 1km up the road. Best thing we ever did, don't know ourselves with the peace and quiet. Lovely neighbours all around us. That first house we had driven up and down the street at all times of the day and night, nothing could have warned us about these people. Sale occurred between Nov-March.. if we had seen the garden drinking in the summer that would have set alarm bells but nothing in the world could have prepared us for how bad it was.

    We are extremely lucky to have gotten away!

    God just shows neighbours really are the most important thing . What general area was this in ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 453 ✭✭ Bargain_Hound


    Cash_Q wrote: »
    Bought first house in 2018 after renting for 15+yrs , ...<snip>

    That does sound like absolute hell.

    Our story - We bought a new build in 2018 and ended up in a terrace attached to several social houses. Similarly to your story, the estate in general was fine, we made a lot of friends in it however we got the unlucky pick of the lot regarding where the council bought and the tenants they moved in. Things weren't "too bad" (Mainly smoking / drinking all day in the gardens, jumping walls, parents didn't work) but they were definitely getting worse and with a lot of young children left to their own most of the time, we decided to get out before it was too late.

    Didn't hang around long and miraculously sold up for a small profit (profit didn't even cover 1% of the hearthache) and moved elsewhere. We now have a smaller house with the greatest bunch of neighbours, with peace and quiet and I'll never ever look back.


  • Registered Users Posts: 440 ✭✭ ebayissues


    godtabh wrote: »
    That’s whey you due a pre inspection survey and make an offer to cover that. None of the above should have been a surprise.


    There's no way a pre-inspection survey will cover all of this. Like with you hearing the neighbour's, if the survey was done when the neighbour's are at work and the children at school, tthis wouldn't show up. .. Even does a pre inspection survey cover this?


  • Registered Users Posts: 440 ✭✭ ebayissues


    There's defo for after purchase regrets and thoughts, my own house has funny noises which seems to be coming from the wall - more from my neighbors side. I can hear my neighbor laughing whilst watching TV but not their TV.
    I switched the bed in the main room and I can hear almost everything, when running up the stairs, shutting doors etc.
    They have a boiler opposite wall of second room, it turns on and off randomly and I can hear this from all floors upstairs.
    Floors, creaks, no underlay.
    It's a midterrace house,
    From both sides, i can hear neighbour's opening press, sometimes one of them at 5.3/6am in the morning.
    It's the noises that bother me the most, especially cylinder banging,
    Not sure what its tbh. It's as if someone is using hitting the radiators or something.
    Strange - also when washing machine is on,
    I can hear the rumbling. Not sure how a pre-inspection would cover anything of this.

    Apart from this, neighbors are sound. No issues at all.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,228 ✭✭✭ The J Stands for Jay


    mick121 wrote: »
    That is your solicitors fault, should have been written into the contract that she'd,attic etc has to be cleared.

    Isn't that standard in contracts? Doesn't stop people leaving crap, and their arsehole solicitors from accusing us of trying to get a free skip for renovations.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 555 ✭✭✭ MSVforever


    That does sound like absolute hell.

    Our story - We bought a new build in 2018 and ended up in a terrace attached to several social houses. Similarly to your story, the estate in general was fine, we made a lot of friends in it however we got the unlucky pick of the lot regarding where the council bought and the tenants they moved in. Things weren't "too bad" (Mainly smoking / drinking all day in the gardens, jumping walls, parents didn't work) but they were definitely getting worse and with a lot of young children left to their own most of the time, we decided to get out before it was too late.

    Didn't hang around long and miraculously sold up for a small profit (profit didn't even cover 1% of the hearthache) and moved elsewhere. We now have a smaller house with the greatest bunch of neighbours, with peace and quiet and I'll never ever look back.


    That's exactly the reason why many folks oppose social housing in a private estate where you are paying top dollar for your mortgage busting your backside going to work every day while the "less well off" pay peanuts to the council and have too much time on their hands to make other people's life a misery.
    Imo the council should have plenty of background checks to ensure that only decent tenants move into new estates (there are plenty of hardworking decent folks living in council estates who should be transfered first instead of the troublemakers).


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,531 ✭✭✭ Furze99


    Turned on the tap and white sludgy stuff came out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 490 ✭✭ grassylawn


    Plaster crumbling with mould from condensation concealed behind fitted wardrobe in bedroom.
    External garage roof leaking.
    Waste pipe at wrong angle so blocked frequently.
    Surface water ingress into septic system resulting in regular failure.
    Septic system was not working.
    Multiple gas leaks outside resulting in decommissioning of system upon reporting.
    Leaking radiator pipes.
    Failed seal on bathroom window sill resulting in water ingress and mould under pvc cladding.
    External wall insulation stops at bottom of roof, meaning the top foot of wall is uninsulated.
    Fireplace was in breach of regulations and classed as a fire hazard.
    The pipe from one of the gutter drains terminates in a hard clay slope on the other side of the concrete apron. It should lead to a soakpit at least five metres away.

    All fixed except for the last one. That is complicated by a large area of patio draining into it as well, and the fact that the only viable place to put a new soak pit is a good distance away and past multiple obstacles. That is of course why it wasn't done properly in the first place. The gutter on that side goes into a big water butt to mitigate the impact until it is sorted out.


  • Administrators, Business & Finance Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 16,778 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ Toots


    McGaggs wrote: »
    Isn't that standard in contracts? Doesn't stop people leaving crap, and their arsehole solicitors from accusing us of trying to get a free skip for renovations.

    Yeah this apparently happens a lot. My sister bought a couple of years ago and insisted on doing a final walk through of the house the day before she was due to close and she discovered that all the crap furniture and stuff that was supposed to be removed was still there. Obviously the vendor just assumed it would close and the stuff wouldn't be his problem anymore, but my sister got straight on to the estate agent and they/the vendor tried to fob her off saying they'd send a van round to collect all the stuff the next week.

    She told them she wouldn't be releasing the funds until the crap had been cleared out, and miraculously they were suddenly able to get the van round that night and clear it all out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,547 ✭✭✭✭ Ace2007


    MSVforever wrote: »
    That's exactly the reason why many folks oppose social housing in a private estate where you are paying top dollar for your mortgage busting your backside going to work every day while the "less well off" pay peanuts to the council and have too much time on their hands to make other people's life a misery.
    Imo the council should have plenty of background checks to ensure that only decent tenants move into new estates (there are plenty of hardworking decent folks living in council estates who should be transfered first instead of the troublemakers).

    While i agree to an extent, where do the "the less well off" live? Perhaps if other controls where better, or we weren't a nation that give 200+ quid for doing nothing then things would change. Also in the posters post - only one of the 3 issues was because of the council.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,860 ✭✭✭ D3V!L


    Toots wrote: »
    Yeah this apparently happens a lot. My sister bought a couple of years ago and insisted on doing a final walk through of the house the day before she was due to close and she discovered that all the crap furniture and stuff that was supposed to be removed was still there. Obviously the vendor just assumed it would close and the stuff wouldn't be his problem anymore, but my sister got straight on to the estate agent and they/the vendor tried to fob her off saying they'd send a van round to collect all the stuff the next week.

    She told them she wouldn't be releasing the funds until the crap had been cleared out, and miraculously they were suddenly able to get the van round that night and clear it all out.

    We did that on the sale of our house. Turns out the attic was full of rubbish. The house was immaculate apart from that.

    They cleared out the attic alright. Destroyed the stairs carpet and made sure they scraped the wall all the way down as well. :mad:


  • Registered Users Posts: 151 ✭✭ joxer1988


    All - Is there an FOI request you can put in to find out how many council tenants are in a given post-code or something like this?


  • Registered Users Posts: 616 ✭✭✭ houseyhouse


    joxer1988 wrote: »
    All - Is there an FOI request you can put in to find out how many council tenants are in a given post-code or something like this?

    Use the small area population statistics tool from the CSO. https://www.cso.ie/en/census/census2016reports/census2016smallareapopulationstatistics/

    Follow the link for SAPMAP. Zoom into your local area. Turn on the layer called 'statistical small areas'. Click on your area and follow the link to demographics. The info on whether homes are owner-occupied, rented from private ll, rented from council etc. is under the section 'Housing'. It's a great tool when you're moving. Can find out education levels, number of kids in different age groups, etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,868 ✭✭✭ Caranica


    Use the small area population statistics tool from the CSO. https://www.cso.ie/en/census/census2016reports/census2016smallareapopulationstatistics/

    Follow the link for SAPMAP. Zoom into your local area. Turn on the layer called 'statistical small areas'. Click on your area and follow the link to demographics. The info on whether homes are owner-occupied, rented from private ll, rented from council etc. is under the section 'Housing'. It's a great tool when you're moving. Can find out education levels, number of kids in different age groups, etc.

    Only valid as of the last census and well out of date in urban areas. Use it for work.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭ Cash_Q


    God just shows neighbours really are the most important thing . What general area was this in ?

    Tallaght, I grew up here and like most places it has good and bad and in between. This place is very settled, mostly owner occupiers with families. We got extremely unlucky, but it could happen anywhere.
    Didn't hang around long and miraculously sold up for a small profit (profit didn't even cover 1% of the hearthache) and moved elsewhere. We now have a smaller house with the greatest bunch of neighbours, with peace and quiet and I'll never ever look back.

    As Sweet Science says, good neighbours are the most important thing of all!


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