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Moving to Spiddal or surrounding area

  • 31-05-2021 1:23pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 60 ✭✭ u2fanatic


    Hi folks,
    Due to the fact my wife can remote wok now and I can get a transfer to galway in my job we are strongly considering moving to galway. ideally somewhere in the soiddal area or maybe or small bit further. We have 3 young kids and no real ties to where we currently live. We have no relations in galway and no real connections except for the fact we love to area and feel like we could be really happy there with a great quality of life. My wife is still very apprehensive about the move though due to no family or no connections as such. She feels the kids my suffer and is just generally scared about the whole thing even though she really wants to do it. Is there anyone in here who may have done a move like this who could give me some feedback.? thanks in advance


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 23,880 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    How well do you speak Irish?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,519 ✭✭✭ GalwayGrrrrrl


    Check the broadband service very carefully before you move- not strong in all areas.

    Schools may be Irish speaking - not necessarily a bad thing but be prepared.
    Visit in the summer and winter if possible. Very different vibe.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,091 ✭✭✭ GerardKeating


    How well do you speak Irish?

    No need to speak Irish, most/every one will speak to you in English.

    But for the kids, all the schools in Spiddal and beyond will be Irish Speaking, so unless they in a Gael Scoil already, they might struggle as first.

    We are an English speaking family, a bit beyond Spiddal, and it is a bit of a struggle helping the kids with the home work when required, but it well worth it for bilingual kids.

    Otherwise, the only isssue is transport, ye might need two cars. 12 buses a day into town.

    Much of the area does have fibre Broadband, but only really near the main road into town, once ye more that 500/700m up a side road, forget it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 320 ✭✭ klr87


    [QUOTE=GalwayGrrrrrl;117313581]Check the broadband service very carefully before you move- not strong in all areas.

    Schools may be Irish speaking - not necessarily a bad thing but be prepared.
    Visit in the summer and winter if possible. Very different vibe.[/QUOTE]
    Very true. I've heard that mobile phone and wireless broadband access can be spotty if you don't have clear line of sight access to a mast, and that was from someone living near Barna, whose house is located in a slight "hollow".


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,519 ✭✭✭ GalwayGrrrrrl


    klr87 wrote: »
    Very true. I've heard that mobile phone and wireless broadband access can be spotty if you don't have clear line of sight access to a mast, and that was from someone living near Barna, whose house is located in a slight "hollow".

    I live three miles from Eyre square and can see a phone mast from my window. My broadband is still not that strong and I often have to use 4g for working remotely - the 4g is sometimes dodgy too.

    Galway is a lovely place to live from a lifestyle perspective but if you are used to a big city it is a shock to the system. Our house has no mains sewers and no mains gas. Nearly everyone in our area are related to each other. I personally couldn’t cope mentally with living any further out from the city. I won’t mention the traffic as that is well documented elsewhere.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 320 ✭✭ klr87


    I live three miles from Eyre square and can see a phone mast from my window. My broadband is still not that strong and I often have to use 4g for working remotely - the 4g is sometimes dodgy too.

    Galway is a lovely place to live from a lifestyle perspective but if you are used to a big city it is a shock to the system. Our house has no mains sewers and no mains gas. Nearly everyone in our area are related to each other. I personally couldn’t cope mentally with living any further out from the city. I won’t mention the traffic as that is well documented elsewhere.
    For anyone used to city life, the countryside mentality could be a massive culture shock. Who you know and who you're related to count for so much. Everything you do will be watched and taken note of, purely as a matter of routine Nothing sinister, that's just the way it is. You just don't have the same level of anonymity that you would get even in a "small" city like Galway.

    As for the traffic: Unless and until that bypass gets built, the congestion is likely to get worse. If fact, depending on where you are trying to get to, it might not improve matters much. So working from home (as mentioned by the OP) could really make a difference.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,084 ✭✭✭ what_traffic


    u2fanatic wrote: »
    We have 3 young kids and no real ties to where we currently live. We have no relations in galway and no real connections except for the fact we love to area and feel like we could be really happy there with a great quality of life. My wife is still very apprehensive about the move though due to no family or no connections as such. She feels the kids my suffer and is just generally scared about the whole thing even though she really wants to do it. Is there anyone in here who may have done a move like this who could give me some feedback.? thanks in advance

    Roughly what age are the kids, the few people I know who have done this kind of change, I think they would say it is much easier with young children (under 8)rather than older. It can be key way of integrating into a "rural" community if they start at at the local school, GAA club etc


  • Registered Users Posts: 60 ✭✭ u2fanatic


    Kids are 6 , 3 and 1... I wonder would my 6yo struggle with the Irish language in school? Of the people you know who moved would you say they are happy with their decision?


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,584 ✭✭✭✭ pjohnson


    Thinking a few years down the line, Unless you plan on sending the kids to secondary school in CCM getting them in on time to any school based town will be a major pain.

    And that commute will eat hours from your day, busses not always suitable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,856 ✭✭✭ frozenfrozen


    wouldn't do it unless you were both WFH (or even just a few days in office) and could guarantee somewhere with FTTH internet


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  • Registered Users Posts: 378 ✭✭ newuser99999


    Wouldn’t recommend working from home with the internet situation out this way. Have you been out here in the winter? It’s quite different to summer time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 510 ✭✭✭ Cal4567


    Surely the Broadband Plan will be nationally rolled out over the next 2 years, negating this issue. Isn't a 95% land area the target?


  • Registered Users Posts: 378 ✭✭ newuser99999


    Cal4567 wrote: »
    Surely the Broadband Plan will be nationally rolled out over the next 2 years, negating this issue. Isn't a 95% land area the target?

    They haven’t even conducted the surveys out here yet...it’s going to take a lot longer than 2 years.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,919 ✭✭✭ simongurnick


    Spiddal is a lovely spot, but depends what you want. With 3 young kids you might be better living in Knocknacarra where there would be more amenities at hand and then you could still drive out to Spiddal and Connemara whenever you want. But if you are ok with the rural life, away you go.
    I'd say if you don't have some Irish, it would be a nice time to learn, but as mentioned previously the schools around there will be in irish.

    Furbo on the way out from Galway is nice too and on the other sides of the hills ,Oughterard and Moycullen are nice, but you will be by the lake and not by the sea...but still lovely.

    Good luck!


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,091 ✭✭✭ GerardKeating


    u2fanatic wrote: »
    Kids are 6 , 3 and 1... I wonder would my 6yo struggle with the Irish language in school? Of the people you know who moved would you say they are happy with their decision?

    The school will help with that. A struggle for a few months, but worth it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 510 ✭✭✭ Cal4567


    They haven’t even conducted the surveys out here yet...it’s going to take a lot longer than 2 years.

    Thanks. So, 3-4 years, that sort of timeframe? Or do you think much longer than that?


  • Registered Users Posts: 93 ✭✭ lisabiscuit


    My sister and her family have just made the move from Dublin to Furbo. We are from Galway city though so moving to be closer to the rest of us. They bought a house in a new estate and they had to do an Irish language exam. Apparently a certain percentage of the builds had to have Irish speakers and a certain percentage could be non Irish speaking homes. Her husband is fluent and the kids went to Irish language schools in Dublin but just to be aware of that element. She's delighted to be back in the West and raves about Furbo, the school, the beach and the general life style. Best of luck with your decision anyway. Hope everything goes your way.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,084 ✭✭✭ what_traffic


    u2fanatic wrote: »
    Kids are 6 , 3 and 1... I wonder would my 6yo struggle with the Irish language in school? Of the people you know who moved would you say they are happy with their decision?

    Would not worry about that aspect, most kids can start a 2nd language quite easy up to 12. First semester or two might be a bit of a challenge.
    Spiddal/Inverin is not like moving to remote rural Ireland. If you were going to the Aran Islands now ... :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,084 ✭✭✭ what_traffic


    u2fanatic wrote: »
    Of the people you know who moved would you say they are happy with their decision?

    Anybody I know who had children who moved to rural area's it was far easier to integrate if they have children. They are like connectors/networkers who cast a far wider net. ( same for people moving to towns/City's as well, its just the way of the world) Like any move, its going to be a challenge setting up initially.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,880 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    Anybody I know who had children who moved to rural area's it was far easier to integrate if they have children. They are like connectors/networkers who cast a far wider net. ( same for people moving to towns/City's as well, its just the way of the world) Like any move, its going to be a challenge setting up initially.

    Agreed.

    But if you don't have Irish already, get busy learning it: people will speak to you in English, but if you want to know what's really going or, or what you kids are getting up to when they're teenagers, you need the language.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,255 ✭✭✭ Tilikum17


    My sister and her family have just made the move from Dublin to Furbo. We are from Galway city though so moving to be closer to the rest of us. They bought a house in a new estate and they had to do an Irish language exam. Apparently a certain percentage of the builds had to have Irish speakers and a certain percentage could be non Irish speaking homes. Her husband is fluent and the kids went to Irish language schools in Dublin but just to be aware of that element. She's delighted to be back in the West and raves about Furbo, the school, the beach and the general life style. Best of luck with your decision anyway. Hope everything goes your way.

    Furbo is beautiful and will only get better in the next few years imo. Obviously you only need that Irish exam if youre buying a new build.


  • Registered Users Posts: 732 ✭✭✭ VanWildcard


    Tilikum17 wrote: »
    Obviously you only need that Irish exam if youre buying a new build.

    Interesting, was wondering this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 43,746 ✭✭✭✭ 6


    You can't put a price being so close to the sea in a fantastic location. Beautiful part of the world.

    Doubt you'd ever regret moving there tbh. Best of luck.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,283 ✭✭✭ irishguy


    u2fanatic wrote: »
    Hi folks,
    Due to the fact my wife can remote wok now and I can get a transfer to galway in my job we are strongly considering moving to galway. ideally somewhere in the soiddal area or maybe or small bit further. We have 3 young kids and no real ties to where we currently live. We have no relations in galway and no real connections except for the fact we love to area and feel like we could be really happy there with a great quality of life. My wife is still very apprehensive about the move though due to no family or no connections as such. She feels the kids my suffer and is just generally scared about the whole thing even though she really wants to do it. Is there anyone in here who may have done a move like this who could give me some feedback.? thanks in advance

    I would strongly advise not moving if you have family connections where you are with young children, very simple things are more complex without any family near by.

    Also keep in mind there are a lot less job opportunities if your moving from Dublin , depending on your fields. So make sure your happy you know the local employment market and the rates on offer, as both of you are more than likely not going to be in the same job when you retire. So factor that into your house budget.

    It's an nice area in the summer, but can be quite different in the winter months. It's also quite conservative area and like alot of country areas it's a bit harder to fit in unless you get involved in local life i.e. gaa/speak Irish etc having kids will really help you to get to know people in the area.

    It might be better to rent there for a bit and ensure your fully happy with the change in lifestyle


  • Registered Users Posts: 60 ✭✭ u2fanatic


    is there anyone on here who has actually done a move similar to this that would be willing to talk privately?



  • Posts: 0 ✭✭ [Deleted User]


    If you want to be part of the community you need to speak Irish. All the schools are Irish speaking, all community events are in the Irish language. The community is working hard to keep the area a majority Irish speaking area. If you don’t intend to learn the language and just want to live in a rural area I’d suggest moving to Kinvara or Oughterard to be honest.



  • Posts: 0 ✭✭ [Deleted User]


    @u2fanatic If you are an English speaking family move to an English speaking area. Ireland is a beautiful country with lots of lovely places. People in the area will be polite as @GerardKeating has said but an English speaking family has a negative impact on the language in the area whatever way you look at it. People complain about this a lot in Irish with other Irish speakers as it impacts their children and their lives. The most annoying thing is people expecting you to turn the conversation to English when they show up. The area needs Irish speaking families to move in. That’s why the language restrictions exist regarding building and what community organisations are trying to work with.



  • Registered Users Posts: 43,746 ✭✭✭✭ 6


    You don't need to speak Irish to be part of the community. I know that for a fact as I know people living there that don't speak fluently.

    However, it's definitely beneficial as Irish is widely spoken, and tbh if your kids are in school etc, you'll end up picking up quite a bit of the language anyway.



  • Posts: 0 ✭✭ [Deleted User]


    @6 I live there too and speaking Irish does help in being part of the community.



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  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators Posts: 7,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Jim2007


    Late I know, but a 6 year old should not have problems with the language, so long as they are living it too - playing with class mates etc... I see it here in the Swiss schools as well, kids up to about 7 seem to have no issues it takes them a few months and they just get on with it. Kids above that age though seem to really struggle with it unless the are very committed and willing to work at it.



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