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Fence Posts

  • 13-05-2021 11:54am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 443 ✭✭ Czhornet


    What do people use for fence posts in wet ground?
    i'm pissed off with timber posts getting 4/5 years max from them as they rot at ground level.
    Is there any alternative's? Had a mad idea to use 76mm galv tube for every second one, but will they last the test of time.

    Thanks.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,108 ✭✭✭ hopeso


    Good quality creosote posts should last longer than that....Concrete would be another option.


  • Registered Users Posts: 443 ✭✭ Czhornet


    hopeso wrote: »
    Good quality creosote posts should last longer than that....Concrete would be another option.

    I've tried the precast concrete posts in the past and they are sh1t, cattle scratch off them and crack them and they are loose with only the reinforcing wire holding them.

    Must look for good quality creosote timber or some old ESB/Eircom poles too as those tanalised ones are only fit for firewood


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 The11Duff


    Try clipex posts, Expensive but worth it


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,066 ✭✭✭ cute geoge


    i taught the plastic ones from clare were the job


  • Registered Users Posts: 359 ✭✭ FarmerDougal


    Czhornet wrote: »
    What do people use for fence posts in wet ground?
    i'm pissed off with timber posts getting 4/5 years max from them as they rot at ground level.
    Is there any alternative's? Had a mad idea to use 76mm galv tube for every second one, but will they last the test of time.

    Thanks.

    Galb tube would be a good job, is it electric fence how will u Insulate. 99% of Timber posts are dirt


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  • Registered Users Posts: 701 ✭✭✭ minerleague


    Czhornet wrote: »
    What do people use for fence posts in wet ground?
    i'm pissed off with timber posts getting 4/5 years max from them as they rot at ground level.
    Is there any alternative's? Had a mad idea to use 76mm galv tube for every second one, but will they last the test of time.

    Thanks.

    Often thought of using galv pipe in concrete base ( but wrap pipe in plastic as concrete sets so you could lift it in/out after) Have done this with 4 " piping in front of silage base to make removable barrier. Dont know would you be able to insulate electric fence easily?? Concrete posts would be other option


  • Registered Users Posts: 443 ✭✭ Czhornet


    Galb tube would be a good job, is it electric fence how will u Insulate. 99% of Timber posts are dirt

    either cut a notch in the tube to hold 1/2 pipe or pre drill a pilot hole into the tube and screw in those yellow holders with the screw at the back as used in a timber post.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,661 ✭✭✭ White Clover


    Czhornet wrote: »
    either cut a notch in the tube to hold 1/2 pipe or pre drill a pilot hole into the tube and screw in those yellow holders with the screw at the back as used in a timber post.


    PDM creosote posts being used here with the last 12 years. All still perfect and I expect to get at least 20 years out of them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,343 ✭✭✭ Limestone Cowboy


    Galb tube would be a good job, is it electric fence how will u Insulate. 99% of Timber posts are dirt

    Tec screw on insulators. I have it done in part of the winterage here. Was fast enough to do and works the finest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,343 ✭✭✭ Limestone Cowboy


    Found a pic


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  • Registered Users Posts: 359 ✭✭ FarmerDougal


    Found a pic

    Lifetime job nice


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,770 ✭✭✭ Good loser


    PDM creosote posts being used here with the last 12 years. All still perfect and I expect to get at least 20 years out of them.

    I've never seen a creosoted post rot - in 15/20 years using them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,155 ✭✭✭ Castlekeeper


    I would think the likes of clipex or galv pipe are useless in soft ground. Unless they went down around 18" wouldnt they be loose in no time?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,155 ✭✭✭ Castlekeeper


    PDM creosote posts being used here with the last 12 years. All still perfect and I expect to get at least 20 years out of them.

    Thanks for that. Just called them and found out that our local FRS are stockists.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,358 ✭✭✭ jaymla627


    Found a pic

    What make are the insulators, have some rocky ground here and have a notion of welding a base plate onto a pipe like your using and using genie to drill holes and bolt posts it into ground


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,343 ✭✭✭ Limestone Cowboy


    jaymla627 wrote: »
    What make are the insulators, have some rocky ground here and have a notion of welding a base plate onto a pipe like your using and using genie to drill holes and bolt posts it into ground

    They are pel insulators, I picked them up in the farm relief store.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,343 ✭✭✭ Limestone Cowboy


    I would think the likes of clipex or galv pipe are useless in soft ground. Unless they went down around 18" wouldnt they be loose in no time?

    Ya the ground would want to be fairly solid. Not a hope I would have got timber posts down where I used them. They have their place.


  • Registered Users Posts: 443 ✭✭ Czhornet


    I would think the likes of clipex or galv pipe are useless in soft ground. Unless they went down around 18" wouldnt they be loose in no time?

    Same could be said for timber posts!

    Trouble here is a 6 foot post could end up being 4 foot high or less when driven into the soft ground, so length is a factor


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,903 ✭✭✭ herdquitter


    The concrete posts I see around here seem to last. Know a lad in SW England still using concrete posts made by POW's in WW2.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭ Dinzee Conlee


    The concrete posts I see around here seem to last. Know a lad in SW England still using concrete posts made by POW's in WW2.

    There was a railway running local years ago, was taken up in the 60s I think.
    The bounds here was fenced with sleepers from the railway...

    I replaced the fence about 10 years ago, most of the sleepers were well gone to be fair, but a few were still good... They were holding up the wire still, but any pressure and they would have given way...

    That’s what, about 40-50 years, after they were probably laid in the railway around 1890 or so I think...

    Was some dose putting them in though I imagine, they were all dug in by hand, a sleeper every 5 yards or so...


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  • Registered Users Posts: 701 ✭✭✭ minerleague


    Read somewhere to drill some holes into timber posts just at ground level ( in and down ) and put waste engine oil or similar into hole every so often. Haven't done this myself but idea is posts will usually rot at this point but the oil penetrates into center of post. Too much bother ??? maybe worth doing corner posts as experiment


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,155 ✭✭✭ Castlekeeper


    Czhornet wrote: »
    Same could be said for timber posts!

    Trouble here is a 6 foot post could end up being 4 foot high or less when driven into the soft ground, so length is a factor

    They say girth even more so...


  • Registered Users Posts: 67 ✭✭ curiousinvestor


    Anyone have a price for the creosote posts
    I got little short posts from kerry coop about 10 years ago , nothing special, lasted this long but they are way too short.
    I've been getting much longer heavier ones from crecora since. They are cheap enough but 5 to 7 years is about the limit of em.


  • Registered Users Posts: 452 ✭✭ Alibaba


    What are the plastic ones like. Any good ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,903 ✭✭✭ herdquitter


    They say girth even more so...

    True, I've a corner strainer to go in soft ground. I've some 6ft creo posts left there but I think I'll go travelling for something beefier.
    Anyone have a price for the creosote posts
    I got little short posts from kerry coop about 10 years ago , nothing special, lasted this long but they are way too short.
    I've been getting much longer heavier ones from crecora since. They are cheap enough but 5 to 7 years is about the limit of em.

    I bought some 6 foots, they're grant spec I think, they were €9 something each, 5 foots were $7 something. I've cut some making struts and the creo goes all the way in. They look and feel very well made.

    New neighbour is putting up a new fence and doing all creo, he got some 6 foots for €6.30. They're no where near as thick as the ones I bought and it appears quite a few have split while being driven - with what I don't know.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,400 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    I would think the likes of clipex or galv pipe are useless in soft ground. Unless they went down around 18" wouldnt they be loose in no time?

    Would be perfect around a well or something if you put a barrow of concrete around each.


  • Registered Users Posts: 519 ✭✭✭ French Toast


    I saw a post somewhere that suggested the Clipex don't last well in wet/boggy ground, acidity eats the galvanize off them. Only vaguely remember reading it so open to correction. Great yokes otherwise.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,770 ✭✭✭ Good loser


    In the prairies in US they have a special tree(maybe osage) whose posts last up to 100 years. Cost about 5$ each and they string 4/5 strands barbed wire on them. Strange looking posts, not straight, twisted about 6 ft long.
    Maybe out of swamps? Don't know are they the result of pollarding?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,770 ✭✭✭ Good loser


    Alibaba wrote: »
    What are the plastic ones like. Any good ?

    Saw new bales black plastic posts in coop recently.
    Probably 5" diam and 5/6 ft long. Very sturdy and can be machine driven, take nails etc.
    Pricey at €14 each.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 110 ✭✭ Durrus Boy


    Have a neighbour who buys blocks of bitumen, heats it in a keg and dips the bottom 2 foot of each pole in it. Swears by the process!!!


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