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Highest house in your area?

  • 13-03-2021 11:49pm
    #1
    Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ Nqp15hhu


    Just out of interest. Locally I can only see a house at about 810 feet (250 metres), most “high elevation” homes are around 700 feet. I have found one above 1,000 feet but that is rare and about 20 miles away.

    Not sure if this is due to climate or other reasons. But thinking of this winter and previous winters anywhere above 1000 feet here has snow cover about 30 days (or more) each winter.

    I always thought I’d love to live at that altitude but I can imagine its a nightmare getting in and out, as I would imagine the road wouldn’t be ploughed. Plus the summers would probably struggle to get above 22c on the hottest days.

    I am sure any house above 1500 feet would have a semi permanent snow cover. As the average high at that altitude would be about 3c.

    So what is the highest house in your area by elevation?


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Comments

  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 49 Deseras


    I use four wheel drive and never get stuck in snow


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ Nqp15hhu


    Deseras wrote: »
    I use four wheel drive and never get stuck in snow

    What elevation do you live at? Just thinking above 1000 feet here you definitely couldn’t use normal tyres.


  • Registered Users Posts: 644 ✭✭✭ hurikane


    Nqp15hhu wrote: »
    Just out of interest. Locally I can only see a house at about 810 feet (250 metres), most “high elevation” homes are around 700 feet. I have found one above 1,000 feet but that is rare and about 20 miles away.

    Not sure if this is due to climate or other reasons. But thinking of this winter and previous winters anywhere above 1000 feet here has snow cover about 30 days (or more) each winter.

    I always thought I’d love to live at that altitude but I can imagine its a nightmare getting in and out, as I would imagine the road wouldn’t be ploughed. Plus the summers would probably struggle to get above 22c on the hottest days.

    I am sure any house above 1500 feet would have a semi permanent snow cover. As the average high at that altitude would be about 3c.

    So what is the highest house in your area by elevation?

    What country are you in? Nowhere in Ireland has semi permanent snow cover.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ Nqp15hhu


    hurikane wrote: »
    What country are you in? Nowhere in Ireland has semi permanent snow cover.

    Yes the high hills do. Here above 1000 feet averages 30 days of snow cover. That increases 5 days ever 300 feet.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,023 ✭✭✭ Donegal Storm


    Nqp15hhu wrote: »
    Yes the high hills do. Here above 1000 feet averages 30 days of snow cover. That increases 5 days ever 300 feet.

    Eh.. that definitely isn't true :confused:

    Plenty hills in Donegal well above 600m/2000ft that I'd say at a rough estimate have ~15-20 days of snow cover in a normal year at the peaks. I also drive through Meenaroy frequently which I think tops out at around 300m/1000ft and there's maybe 5-10 days in a normal year where it's any way dodgy with snow.

    As for highest houses, a quick play around with maps.ie I can see plenty in the higher parts of Letterkenny around 170m, highest I can see is 216m just north of the town


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,130 ✭✭✭ Rodin


    Nqp15hhu wrote: »
    Yes the high hills do. Here above 1000 feet averages 30 days of snow cover. That increases 5 days ever 300 feet.

    2 to 3 months a year of snow cover is not semi-permanent. And nobody is living at the top of Carrauntoohil.

    Nowhere in Ireland has 'semi-permanent' snow cover.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,130 ✭✭✭ Rodin


    Nqp15hhu wrote: »
    Yes the high hills do. Here above 1000 feet averages 30 days of snow cover. That increases 5 days ever 300 feet.

    Where's your evidence that elevations of 330m in Ireland have 30 days annually of snow cover?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ Nqp15hhu


    Rodin wrote: »
    2 to 3 months a year of snow cover is not semi-permanent. And nobody is living at the top of Carrauntoohil.

    Nowhere in Ireland has 'semi-permanent' snow cover.

    In the winter, yes it is.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,554 ✭✭✭✭ Graces7


    I lived in the Bluestacks during the snow-winter; while the snow lasted longer than lower down it was not of the duration vaunted here. And that was an exceptional winter.

    The Mayo mountains around Croagh Patrick here show a snow topping occasionally but awhile it can linger a few days again not of long duration. And not every winter.

    OP needs to gather correct information from residents...


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,348 ✭✭✭ Kaybaykwah


    It seems to me that the temperatures are not cold enough for significant snowfall and accumulation to occur.

    The 3°C the OP mentions is still relatively balmy. Both the ground and air temperatures need to be lower and sustained in order for snow to cover.

    I would't worry about having to install winter tyres in Ireland.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ Nqp15hhu


    Kaybaykwah wrote: »
    It seems to me that the temperatures are not cold enough for significant snowfall and accumulation to occur.

    The 3°C the OP mentions is still relatively balmy. Both the ground and air temperatures need to be lower and sustained in order for snow to cover.

    I would't worry about having to install winter tyres in Ireland.

    Snow can easily lie around at 3c high if it is subzero throughout the night.

    Are you going to bother to answer the question?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,348 ✭✭✭ Kaybaykwah


    Nqp15hhu wrote: »
    Snow can easily lie around at 3c high if it is subzero throughout the night.

    Are you going to bother to answer the question?


    Yes, if the ground is cold enough due to sustained cold temps, the snow can accumulate. The problem is in getting significant snowfalls, and accumulation, which you won't get when temps hover around that. Snow where I live accumulated to about 2 feet since december and has only begun to melt dramatically this past week. It is melting because snowfall is turning into rain and because of balmy temps like 3C and above.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ Nqp15hhu


    I have had many cold spells where snow has stayed on the ground for days with highs of 2-3c... if the humidity is low snow is not an issue.

    But answer the question.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,348 ✭✭✭ Kaybaykwah


    Mont St-Hilaire, The closest mountain to me is 19km. It is 414m high. I suppose there are houses situated at maybe 200m , probably not higher than that. My town is at 4m above sea level.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,554 ✭✭✭✭ Graces7


    Nqp15hhu wrote: »
    I have had many cold spells where snow has stayed on the ground for days with highs of 2-3c... if the humidity is low snow is not an issue.

    But answer the question.



    "please"...


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,348 ✭✭✭ Kaybaykwah


    Nqp15hhu wrote: »
    I have had many cold spells where snow has stayed on the ground for days with highs of 2-3c... if the humidity is low snow is not an issue.

    But answer the question.


    Your posts about snow tyres at 1000+ feet don't make sense. Why would you need them when you have random periods of 2 or 3 days of snow cover that disappear in warmer weather slash rain?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,202 ✭✭✭ Gaoth Laidir


    Mine is at 65 m. About 1 km away, between here and Maynooth, there is a "hill" peaking at 92 m. I walked there yesterday and it was bone dry as I left home but there was a covering of about 10 cm at the top of the hill, starting at 90 m. Below 90 m was clear. People were tobogganing down those 2 metres.

    I jest, of course. 92 m is the highest near me but the rest false. Nowhere in Ireland has anything close to semi-permanent snow cover during any winter. As others have said, a few extra days per year. I see the northern side of Kippure (750 m) daily and it generally has a patchy cover for about 5 days after a snow event.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,130 ✭✭✭ Rodin


    Nqp15hhu wrote: »
    In the winter, yes it is.

    So for 3 months of the year.
    That's not "semi permanent".


  • Registered Users Posts: 153 ✭✭ CirrusBusiness


    Highest up here at a guess would be about 300 metres or just shy of 1000 feet up the back of Tomduff. (Near Mt Leinster) Most are around the 150m mark or below.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20 gooseman12


    The butter road in cork goes pretty high and there's houses to almost 380m from what I can see on the terrain layer on google maps.

    https://www.google.com/maps/place/52.014475,+-8.954645/@52.0146696,-8.9549989,17z/data=!3m1!1e3


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  • Registered Users Posts: 644 ✭✭✭ hurikane


    gooseman12 wrote: »
    The butter road in cork goes pretty high and there's houses to almost 380m from what I can see on the terrain layer on google maps.

    https://www.google.com/maps/place/52.014475,+-8.954645/@52.0146696,-8.9549989,17z/data=!3m1!1e3

    God only knows hose they manage with the semi permanent snow cover.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,138 ✭✭✭ lolie


    Highest near here is 100m but about 5km away as the crow flies theres a few at 200m with hills of 250m behind them.
    95m or so here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,995 ✭✭✭ giveitholly


    hurikane wrote: »
    God only knows hose they manage with the semi permanent snow cover.

    And no snow tyres


  • Registered Users Posts: 644 ✭✭✭ hurikane


    And no snow tyres

    I’d say 6 months of the year it’s, helicopter only, in and out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,940 ✭✭✭ KevRossi


    I only know one person who puts on winter tyres for 4-5 months of the year. Her house is at 300m or so. She needs then to make it easier get out of a steep driveway (150m) maybe 5 days a year, 10 in a colder year. Its just saves on the hassle of clearing the path first thing in the morning, if so she could do it on M+S tyres. Winter tyres actually offer better braking and control in temps under 7 C, so that's another reason for her to change them.

    There is no semi permanent snow cover there, she has had snow cover lasting more than 21 days 4 times since the early 1980's. The 'snow cover' is usually several inches, but is cleared after a couple of days by the council. Her drive takes her a long morning to clear by snow shovel and salt.

    I do a fair bit of hillwalking in Wicklow, we rarely have any issues under 600m in winter. Small pockets of snow in very sheltered locations linger for a few weeks, but there is never anything approaching 'snow cover'.

    I lived near Munich and they had far more snow than we do and it stayed for a lot longer, continental climate and an elevation in excess of 500m sees to that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 487 ✭✭ DumbBrunette


    I never knew about that spot in Cork. I can't think of anywhere in Ireland that has habitation above this level.

    Can anyone beat 380m?

    EDIT: Ballinascorney Lodge B&B in south Dublin is at 440 metres. Given its location in the east of the country, it would get far more snow than anywhere at a similar elevation in Cork or Kerry.

    I'd say that in a cool winter, it could have semi-permanent snow cover!


    gooseman12 wrote: »
    The butter road in cork goes pretty high and there's houses to almost 380m from what I can see on the terrain layer on google maps.

    https://www.google.com/maps/place/52.014475,+-8.954645/@52.0146696,-8.9549989,17z/data=!3m1!1e3


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,034 ✭✭✭ Oneiric 3


    Nqp15hhu wrote: »

    So what is the highest house in your area by elevation?

    Absolutely no idea. Town I live in is pretty flat with just a few sharpish inclines on the other side of it. Would say they go up as far as about 50/55m or so.


    Just out of interest, how much snow & snow days have you observed at your own low lying location throughout this season? No notable hills around here so we have to depend on low lying snow all the time. Would say that overall, the winter just gone has brought below average amounts and number of days with snow, but having said that, I don't recall one single year where I haven't seen snow at some stage in the winter/early spring, even during exceptionally mild ones.

    New Moon



  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ Nqp15hhu


    Oneiric 3 wrote: »
    Absolutely no idea. Town I live in is pretty flat with just a few sharpish inclines on the other side of it. Would say they go up as far as about 50/55m or so.


    Just out of interest, how much snow & snow days have you observed at your own low lying location throughout this season? No notable hills around here so we have to depend on low lying snow all the time. Would say that overall, the winter just gone has brought below average amounts and number of days with snow, but having said that, I don't recall one single year where I haven't seen snow at some stage in the winter/early spring, even during exceptionally mild ones.

    At my location I have had 9 days of snow lying and 20 days of snow falling, which is actually about average but as you say we had a bit of a snow drought in the easterly.

    And yes we always get snow here even in mild winters.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ Nqp15hhu


    gooseman12 wrote: »
    The butter road in cork goes pretty high and there's houses to almost 380m from what I can see on the terrain layer on google maps.

    https://www.google.com/maps/place/52.014475,+-8.954645/@52.0146696,-8.9549989,17z/data=!3m1!1e3

    Wow that’s rather high! Would get a lot of snow here at that height.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ Nqp15hhu


    Kaybaykwah wrote: »
    Your posts about snow tyres at 1000+ feet don't make sense. Why would you need them when you have random periods of 2 or 3 days of snow cover that disappear in warmer weather slash rain?

    Snow lasts more than 2 or 3 days at altitude, more like a week.

    You would need winter tyres because the road wouldn’t be ploughed, do you think you could drive on this with normal tyres?


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