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Citizenship - Where is my passport?

  • 06-01-2021 9:55am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭


    Good morning and happy new year, lads!

    Last December I applied to the Irish citizenship and I had to send my passport (with another 2 Kg. of papers) to the justice department.

    Do you know how long it takes for them to send it back to me?


    Thanks in advance,


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 9,978 ✭✭✭Caranica


    ito wrote: »
    Good morning and happy new year, lads!

    Last December I applied to the Irish citizenship and I had to send my passport (with another 2 Kg. of papers) to the justice department.

    Do you know how long it takes for them to send it back to me?

    Thanks in advance,

    There is no definitive answer, could be weeks, could be months. Do you need it back for a particular reason? If so and you don't get an answer from INIS, then contact your local TD, they have a direct contact in INIS.


  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭ito


    Caranica wrote: »
    There is no definitive answer, could be weeks, could be months. Do you need it back for a particular reason? If so and you don't get an answer from INIS, then contact your local TD, they have a direct contact in INIS.
    Thanks for your answer, I appreciate it.

    I don't actually need it (EU, I have my ID), but they don't say anything about delays sending it back to you... I was just wondering.

    What is a TD?


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,193 ✭✭✭✭Victor


    ito wrote: »
    What is a TD?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teachta_D%C3%A1la
    A Teachta Dála (plural Teachtaí Dála), abbreviated as TD (plural TDanna in Irish or TDs in English), is a member of Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (the Irish Parliament). It is the equivalent of terms such as Member of Parliament (MP) or Member of Congress used in other countries.


  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭ito




  • Registered Users Posts: 7,470 ✭✭✭GerardKeating


    ito wrote: »
    Last December I applied to the Irish citizenship and I had to send my passport (with another 2 Kg. of papers) to the justice department.

    Do you know how long it takes for them to send it back to me?


    When in December did you send it in, it would normally take 2/3 working weeks, but with Christmas/New Year holidays and related postal delays, unles you sent in at the very very start of the month, i would be surpise if it was back by now.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭ito


    When in December did you send it in, it would normally take 2/3 working weeks, but with Christmas/New Year holidays and related postal delays, unles you sent in at the very very start of the month, i would be surpise if it was back by now.

    On the 4th. I will be patience and wait until Feb.; there might be a delay because of Christmas and also the Brexit, as the UK applications were increasing apparently.:eek:


    Thanks!


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    ito wrote: »

    What is a TD?

    Is there not a culture and knowledge test for citizenship in Ireland?


  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭ito


    Is there not a culture and knowledge test for citizenship in Ireland?

    hahahaha! Good one ;)!

    Not for European people. You just need to probe that you have been living/working 5 years in here and pay more than 1K in total. :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,550 ✭✭✭victor8600


    Is there not a culture and knowledge test for citizenship in Ireland?

    None whatsoever. As a naturalised Irish citizen, I would have preferred to have such a test. Maybe also An Ghaeilge test, just to make it more interesting.

    But that would mean that someone in the government would have to make an effort and set the test up, and it's probably too much hassle for a little political gain.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,550 ✭✭✭victor8600


    ito wrote: »
    Do you know how long it takes for them to send it back to me?

    If you need your passport soon, you can call the Dept. and ask them to sent it back. They can check it and make a photocopy, I suppose.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭ito


    victor8600 wrote: »
    If you need your passport soon, you can call the Dept. and ask them to sent it back. They can check it and make a photocopy, I suppose.

    It is grand, I am not in a rush at all!


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    victor8600 wrote: »
    None whatsoever. As a naturalised Irish citizen, I would have preferred to have such a test. Maybe also An Ghaeilge test, just to make it more interesting.

    But that would mean that someone in the government would have to make an effort and set the test up, and it's probably too much hassle for a little political gain.

    Really? I never looked into it before for Ireland. Seems odd that a country will have citizenship without a knowledge of the country and it's spoken language.

    We are a bit too quick to be seen as welcoming sometimes I think


  • Registered Users Posts: 378 ✭✭newuser99999


    Really? I never looked into it before for Ireland. Seems odd that a country will have citizenship without a knowledge of the country and it's spoken language.

    We are a bit too quick to be seen as welcoming sometimes I think

    If most Irish people had to take a spoken language test in the morning they’d fail.

    Get off your high horse.


  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭ito


    Really? I never looked into it before for Ireland. Seems odd that a country will have citizenship without a knowledge of the country and it's spoken language.

    We are a bit too quick to be seen as welcoming sometimes I think
    Nothing at all. Just some (a lot) of paperwork and a payment of around a grand of everything is OK.


  • Registered Users Posts: 40,011 ✭✭✭✭ohnonotgmail


    Really? I never looked into it before for Ireland. Seems odd that a country will have citizenship without a knowledge of the country and it's spoken language.

    We are a bit too quick to be seen as welcoming sometimes I think

    good job we have you to balance that out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,449 ✭✭✭PommieBast


    Caranica wrote: »
    There is no definitive answer, could be weeks, could be months. Do you need it back for a particular reason? If so and you don't get an answer from INIS, then contact your local TD, they have a direct contact in INIS.
    When I applied the one bit of advice I was given was to deliberately omit a minor piece of documentation, as then you get the passport very quickly with a request for further information. Got mine back within a week.


  • Registered Users Posts: 880 ✭✭✭Rachiee


    My partner applied last year, it was v. busy due to Brexit. It took her 16 weeks to get her passport back! I thought it was disgraceful as it would have caused serious difficulties if she had to travel for a family emergency


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,978 ✭✭✭Caranica


    Rachiee wrote: »
    My partner applied last year, it was v. busy due to Brexit. It took her 16 weeks to get her passport back! I thought it was disgraceful as it would have caused serious difficulties if she had to travel for a family emergency

    Like I said, a TD could get it back very quickly if it was urgently needed. They don't hold the passports captive, they just deal with applications strictly in the order they are received.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,742 ✭✭✭✭Peregrinus


    Really? I never looked into it before for Ireland. Seems odd that a country will have citizenship without a knowledge of the country and it's spoken language.

    We are a bit too quick to be seen as welcoming sometimes I think
    Ireland is pretty mainstream here. About two-thirds of EU countries apply a language test for naturalisation, but fewer than half apply any kind of civics test. Both language and civics tests have grown in popularity in the last decade or so.

    The impetus for the tests seems to be political; there has been little research into whether the language tests promote employment or social inclusion opportunities for migrants, or whether the civics tests promote identification with public values of the host society, and such research as has been conducted hasn't found any evidence that they do either of these things.

    The only observed effect is that economically disadvantaged immigrants, who lack the resources to pay for language classes and the like, are less likely to apply for naturalistion, especially if the language test demands a high level of competence, so you risk ending up with an underclass of immigrants who are deterred from seeking naturalisation, which has the opposite effect from promoting integration.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,449 ✭✭✭PommieBast


    Caranica wrote: »
    Like I said, a TD could get it back very quickly if it was urgently needed. They don't hold the passports captive, they just deal with applications strictly in the order they are received.
    Might be true for the initial application checking, but it certainty is not for the process as a whole. I have known spouses who applied at the same time to have 6+ months differences in approval. :eek:


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  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭ito


    Peregrinus wrote: »
    Ireland is pretty mainstream here. About two-thirds of EU countries apply a language test for naturalisation, but fewer than half apply any kind of civics test. Both language and civics tests have grown in popularity in the last decade or so.

    The impetus for the tests seems to be political; there has been little research into whether the language tests promote employment or social inclusion opportunities for migrants, or whether the civics tests promote identification with public values of the host society, and such research as has been conducted hasn't found any evidence that they do either of these things.

    The only observed effect is that economically disadvantaged immigrants, who lack the resources to pay for language classes and the like, are less likely to apply for naturalistion, especially if the language test demands a high level of competence, so you risk ending up with an underclass of immigrants who are deterred from seeking naturalisation, which has the opposite effect from promoting integration.

    Spain has a language, history and a culture exam that I wouldn't pass myself because they ask you even about TV references that I don't follow.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,978 ✭✭✭Caranica


    PommieBast wrote: »
    Might be true for the initial application checking, but it certainty is not for the process as a whole. I have known spouses who applied at the same time to have 6+ months differences in approval. :eek:

    That doesn't mean they don't start processing them at the same time. Spouses won't have the exact same paperwork, employment history, police clearance etc. Some applications just take longer than others.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    is the cost worth it?

    Isn't it about 1200 euro to become an Irish Citizen? I can understand why someone from outside the EU would want citizenship but why an EU citizen? You have all the same rights and privileges apart from voting in referendums I believe?

    Not attacking, just curious to understand the motivation, I can think of far better ways to spend 1200 euro!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,449 ✭✭✭PommieBast


    is the cost worth it?

    Isn't it about 1200 euro to become an Irish Citizen? I can understand why someone from outside the EU would want citizenship but why an EU citizen? You have all the same rights and privileges apart from voting in referendums I believe?

    Not attacking, just curious to understand the motivation, I can think of far better ways to spend 1200 euro!
    The all-in cost including sundries is about €1500. I consider it worth it to regain what I lost due to Brexit, because I know what it is like living with visas.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Afaik, a lot of the current backlog is related to staff being redeployed due to Covid. If it's not urgent I'd just wait until it arrives, since there will be people who need their passports urgently. (at least that's the reason my Irish friend was given when applying for a passport for his kid born elsewhere in the EU).


  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭ito


    is the cost worth it?

    Isn't it about 1200 euro to become an Irish Citizen? I can understand why someone from outside the EU would want citizenship but why an EU citizen? You have all the same rights and privileges apart from voting in referendums I believe?

    Not attacking, just curious to understand the motivation, I can think of far better ways to spend 1200 euro!
    It depends; imagine that you are from East Europe; the Irish passport is more powerful than the Bulgarian one (more info).

    I wouldn't apply for it if I was losing my Spanish passport, but with the UK outside the EU I think it is a good idea to have this one as well.

    Also, I believe that if I wanted to study a Masters here, I wouldn't need to pass an English exam.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    If most Irish people had to take a spoken language test in the morning they’d fail.

    Get off your high horse.

    Really? You think the majority of the nation don't have a reasonable grasp of the English language?

    Being able to perform your day to day tasks in the spoken language of the nation is not an unreasonable requirement.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    ito wrote: »
    Spain has a language, history and a culture exam that I wouldn't pass myself because they ask you even about TV references that I don't follow.

    Deoends on region but it really isn't that hard.
    In them all. If you have lived there and integrated to some extent, you will pass. Or at least that's my view after sitting it. The language course was by far the harder part.

    Peregrinus wrote: »
    Ireland is pretty mainstream here. About two-thirds of EU countries apply a language test for naturalisation, but fewer than half apply any kind of civics test. Both language and civics tests have grown in popularity in the last decade or so.

    The impetus for the tests seems to be political; there has been little research into whether the language tests promote employment or social inclusion opportunities for migrants, or whether the civics tests promote identification with public values of the host society, and such research as has been conducted hasn't found any evidence that they do either of these things.

    The only observed effect is that economically disadvantaged immigrants, who lack the resources to pay for language classes and the like, are less likely to apply for naturalistion, especially if the language test demands a high level of competence, so you risk ending up with an underclass of immigrants who are deterred from seeking naturalisation, which has the opposite effect from promoting integration.

    Indeed and I can only look at personal experience but there's plenty of free Spanish language classes run by the red cross in Spain. I never paid a penny.

    The civic exam should exist, it need not be very difficult but basic stuff like knowing how to vote and the political system is important in a democracy. I passed the spanish version without any studying, it was all fairly generic common knowledge but the catalonian version is supposed to be hard.


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,193 ✭✭✭✭Victor


    Isn't it about 1200 euro to become an Irish Citizen? I can understand why someone from outside the EU would want citizenship but why an EU citizen? You have all the same rights and privileges apart from voting in referendums I believe?
    No. Non-Irish EU citizens can only vote in local elections (and European elections if they don't vote in their other country). British citizens can only vote in local and general elections (and possibly presidential)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 446 ✭✭ebayissues


    Is there not a culture and knowledge test for citizenship in Ireland?

    I'm astonished as well


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